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gluten-free Pizza Crust Questions

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I read a previous post about a pizza crust disaster and got good information about pizza crust, someone preferred the Kinnikinick which is now on my order list for my next on-line shipment. Question: does anyone have experience with and/or suggestions for making "frozen" pizzas to replace the ones that used to be a staple in my newly diagnosed celiac disease teenagers' diets? I am not always home when they get back from athletics or activities and we really miss the frozen foods, pizza in particular, that made a quick meal or snack. Is it possible to make a gluten-free substitute for the frozen pizza and if so, do you bake the crust and then add toppings and freeze, or just freeze dough and keep toppings available so they can add toppings and bake? Has anyone had success with that or some ideas for me? Thanks!

Sheila

--2 teenagers, 17 and 16, diagnosed with celiac disease three weeks ago

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I've made pizza for myself several times now. I use a cookie sheet because it's easier to cut into serving sizes and freeze. And when thawed out the pizza tastes just fine.

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My first attempt at gluten-free pizza was a disaster - it was GROSS! I used a mix (can't remember which brand) and used a cookie sheet. I went ahead and made a whole pizza the normal way, and then cut it into square slices and froze it. It tasted even worse after I thawed the frozen slices and reheated. I was about ready to give up and tried a frozen mini crust that I ordered from the gluten-free Pantry. It was pretty good! As soon as the crusts arrived at my home I froze them. I would think that you should be able to put the sauce, toppings and cheese on the crusts and then freeze them. The kids could take them out of the freezer and bake them for about 15 mins. and they should be ok. Good luck - let me know if you try it and how it works.

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I really like using the Chebe Bread mix for pizza crust, and you can freeze the dough for up to 30 days. I was thinking about making myself some pre-made crusts, freezing them, and then just adding toppings when I was ready to have one.

There are also those Amy's frozen pizzas but they aren't cheap.

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I highly suggest you invest in a pizza stone. Any pizza you try will start out a lot better because of the stone.

They have different brands of frozen little crusts on the market. I like the convenience of Amy's for the kids. Check into www.unitedbuyingclubs.com it is a co-op. You can join an existing co-op or start your own. Since you are buying in bulk it tends to be cheaper.

Laura

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I read a previous post about a pizza crust disaster and got good information about pizza crust, someone preferred the Kinnikinick which is now on my order list for my next on-line shipment. Question: does anyone have experience with and/or suggestions for making "frozen" pizzas to replace the ones that used to be a staple in my newly diagnosed celiac disease teenagers' diets? I am not always home when they get back from athletics or activities and we really miss the frozen foods, pizza in particular, that made a quick meal or snack. Is it possible to make a gluten-free substitute for the frozen pizza and if so, do you bake the crust and then add toppings and freeze, or just freeze dough and keep toppings available so they can add toppings and bake? Has anyone had success with that or some ideas for me? Thanks!

Sheila

--2 teenagers, 17 and 16, diagnosed with celiac disease three weeks ago

Hi Sheila:

I am probably the one who responded to the pizza crust disaster and said I really love Kinnikinnick. I'm glad you are ordering it because you will love it.

I follow the recipe on the package except I always double the yeast and add some gluten-free Italian Seasoning (about 1+ t) to give it a little zip. Following is my method and it works wonders for me. Mix all ingredients if you have a Kitchen Aide mixer or heavy duty stand mixer. If not, hold back about half of the mix and add it in by hand stirring. The dough is so stiff that it wants to climb the beaters of a regular mixer. The recipe on the package makes 4 pie size pizza crusts. I just use greased alum foil pie tins. NOW- here is my secret to success. Once all the ingredients are mixed I take a large ice cream scoop with a lever and spray it well with oil, then scoop up the dough and deposit it equally onto the 4 greased pie tins. Then I spray both of my hands with oil and rub them together fingers and all. I can now pick up the scoop of dough and pat it into a 4" disk; then return to the pan and with a greased hand flatten it out on the bottom of the pan and a little up the edge for a lip. Let rise about 10 min and bake @350 for 14 minutes.

When they come out of the oven, I remove them from pans. If you greased your pans, just give them a shake and they will slide right off. When cool, I bag and freeze and they are ready for toppings and the oven. I bake my topped pizzas on the kind of pans that have little holes in them, but you wouldn't have to. I just find that it keeps the crust crisper. I always have a big supply of crusts in my freezer and its the quickest meal I can fix.

As to making the entire pizza and then freezing for oven ready...yes I've do that too. Mostly I do that when I am making appetizer size pizzas for a party. To freeze the whole pizza, you bake the crust as above and when completely cool add the toppings and cheese, but make sure the toppings are not hot because you do not want the cheese to melt. Then place on a cookie sheet in the freezer without a cover until frozen. When frozen, bag it and return to freezer where it will be ready for a hungry teenager. Bake the frozen pizza about 15 minutes @ 375.

I just find there is more versatility for topping choices with freezing just the crusts. (I like green pepper and my husband doesn't)

Feel free to email me you have any questions at wkcrow@mchsi.com

Good Luck

Kay

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Guest nini

There are several options for quick frozen pizzas that teenagers can pop into the oven and eat...

Amy's Rice Crust Cheese Pizza... already made, they can top it with whatever fave. toppings and bake...

Chebe Bread Mix (follow recipe on bag but DON'T add the cheese) I make two crusts with one bag of mix... bake the crusts first... I then go ahead and top them with hunts tomato paste and cheese and stick in a big Ziplock Freezer bag and freeze. When they want pizza, just heat oven to 375 and add whatever other toppings they want and bake on cookie sheet for about 17 minutes...

Kinnickinick or Glutino have pre made frozen crusts... again, you can top them with sauce and cheese and refreeze (don't let them thaw out while you are topping them) add toppings and bake when ready...

Whole Foods Gluten Free Bakehouse Pizza Crust, keep frozen, top with sauce and cheese, refreeze and top and bake when ready... very quick and easy... this one is my favorite...

if you wanted to go ahead and pre top them with veggies and meats before freezing you could do this too, but what if they aren't in the mood for that particular topping?

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THANK YOU so much for the terrific recipes and tips. I have a Kitchenaide and I bought the pizza pans with holes in the bottom, and some aluminum pie pans (per Katydid's very good post). My Kinnikinnick will come tomorrow, and I do have some GFPantry mix here I might try, too. The techniques were very helpful and I am looking forward to putting some pizzas in the freezer for the kids tomorrow. I'm hoping they work out. I'm finding the closer I can come to making it as easy and convenient as it was before celiac disease, the best chance I have of keeping them on the diet when it gets hard to stick it out. So any little hints you all want to pass on that will help me replace teenager comfort food would always be welcomed!! Thanks again and I'll let you know how it goes.

One last question: Have you figured out something that I could substitute for those little Pillsbury Refrigerator Cinnamon rolls? Any kind of nice, hot, gooey cinnamon bun with icing that they can throw in the oven in the morning while they get ready for school would be a huge help here. I'd even make a batch of frozen if they could bake them up in the morning in less than 25-30 minutes.

Thanks again for all the wonderful advice I get from this forum.

Sheila

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Does your Kitchen Aide mixer have dough beaters? I have a cheaper version, and I just discovered the other day that I was using the regular beaters when I could have been using the ones for dough. It keeps the dough from climbing up the beaters, then ending up on the walls! One easy way to work with pizza dough is to add gluten-free flour to your hands, the surface you are rolling/flattening on, and the dough ball. It makes it much less sticky, and softer, and it won't stick to the rolling pin or your hands. Also, if you spoon in a little ice water (one Tbs. at a time), it makes the dough easier to work with.

I haven't tried any mixes because they seem so expensive. I found a recipe for pizza crust that works great. My whole family loves them and they taste like normal pizzas. You could do anything that was suggested from freezing the dough, to freezing the whole pizza. Here is the link to the recipe:

http://www.gfutah.org/recipes/Pizza_Crust.html

Lisa

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re: Cinnamon Rolls... Kinnickinick has some pre made Frozen cinnamon buns that are quite yummy... They can just heat up however many they want, either in the microwave or in the oven... my daughter LOVES them... They are the closest thing I've found to the cinnamon rolls in a can (I do miss those a lot)....

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re: Cinnamon Rolls... Kinnickinick has some pre made Frozen cinnamon buns that are quite yummy... They can just heat up however many they want, either in the microwave or in the oven... my daughter LOVES them... They are the closest thing I've found to the cinnamon rolls in a can (I do miss those a lot)....

[/quote

Oh Sheila-

You're a gal after my own heart. You are, like me, determined to make things as much as possible like the pre-celiac days. Its become quite a challenge with me and a very enjoyable hobby. My husband and 23 year old granddaughter have celiac and I have several celiac friends. And while I'm determined, I still work every day so it has to be convenient too. As a matter of fact, I was at work when I read your post about the cinnamon rolls and it made me so hungry I couldn't wait to get home to make some. Needless to say, they were practically inhaled That being said here is my recipe while it is fresh in my mind.

I'm not really great at giving directions, so I hope this isn't so long winded that it bores the rest of the forum. Read clear through the recipe first with notes at the end as you might want to do some things different than I do.

Topping

1/4 c melted margarine

1/4 cup brown sugar and 1 t cinnamon mixed together with fork

Spray muffin tins and put 1 t of melted margarine and then 1 t of brown sugar cinnamon mixture in the bottom of each muffin cup. Set aside

Dry Ingredients (whisk to combine in small bowl, not mixer bowl)

2 c Featherlite Mix (2/3 c Rice Flour, 2/3 c Corn Starch, 2/3 c Tapioca Flour, 2 t Potato Flour -not potato starch - I know it doesn't come out to exactly 2 cups, but close enough)

1 1/2 t Xanthum Gum

1/2 t Salt

1 t Unflavored Gelatin

1 t Egg Replacer

1/2 c Sugar

3 T Almond Meal (I don't purchase, I just grind almonds as fine as I can)

1 T Yeast

Wet Ingredients (mix these in your mixer bowl)

Disolve 2 t Potato Buds in 1 c warm water

1/3 c melted margarine

1/2 Vinegar

2 t Honey

3 Eggs

Beat wet ingredients for 2 minutes, then add dry ingredients and beat for 3 more minutes.

While mixer is running mix 1 c sugar and 1 t cinnamon in a 9 x 13 cakepan or anything similar that is long and flat.

Here's where you will think I'm nuts. I am absolutely addicted to scoops, the kind with levers. I have every size they make. You can buy them in kitchen stores. I hate the yucky stickiness of our gluten free doughs and use scoops for everything I make, This also insures uniform amounts.

Take a No. 60 scoop (if its pampered chef and some others the no is on the inside of the ball on the scooper) if not, it measures 1 1/4" accross. If all you have is a cookie scoop that measures 1 1/2" that will work but you will use half as many balls per muffin cup. I suppose you could use 2 teaspons but I've done both and there is way no comparison.

Now spray your scoop with oil and deposit 6 balls of dough in the sugar cinnamon mixture. Toss lightly with 2 forks to coat and then pick balls up with the forks and place in muffin cups. (If you use the larger cookie scoop that measurs 1 1/2" you will only use 3 balls per cup.) This is really just a take-off of the old pull apart cinnamon rolls we used to make with refrigerated biscuits.

Let rise in a warm place 30 minutes or until doubled. Then bake 20 minutes @ 350. Take from oven and invert tins immediately. Drizzle with a powdered sugar frosting from a heavy duty ziplock sandwich bag with a tiny snip in one corner.

The rolls can be made and frozen and the frosting can be kept in the frig with a paperclip across the snip of the bag of course. Just a quick nuke of the roll and a drizzle of frosting while its still warm and its breakfast.

Notes:

If you want these for take-alongs, I have put a teaspon of frosting in a little 2" x 2" zip lock bag and toss them in the freezer right along in the same bag with the frozen cinnamon rolls. You can grab one of each and go. I don 't remember where I purchased mine but I'm sure you can get them at paper warehouses or hobby shops.

The reason I said use a heavy duty sandwich bag earlier for your frosting is that I have used cheaper ones and when I squeeze to drizzle, they split and you end up with frosting everywhere. Personally I have now taken to warming the frosting just a tad and using a funnel I put it in one of those squeeze bottles with a drizzle tip (you know like they sell for ketchup and mustard, but I prefer the clear ones so I can see what I'm doing-I bought mine at a beauty supply house where they sell them to beauty operators to mix hair color in)

This can also be assembled and baked in a bundt pan, but would take longer to bake. I'm thinking about 35 or 40 minutes. Then inverted immediately and drizzled while still warm.

While this looks like a lot of work, if you are making them to stockpile in the freezer for convenience sake, it really isn't. I made them tonight from start to finish while dinner was in the oven.

Here is a shortcut you can use that would really speed things up. Use any equivalent amount of a bread mix for your dry ingredients and just add the 1/2 c Sugar and 3 T Almond Meal . Its the same thing. Or you can use this recipe with two cups of any gluten free flour combination . I just happen to like the Featherlite Mix.

This recipe is on page 230 of Bette Hagman's "The Gluten Free Gourmet Makes Bread". The only change I made is increase the sugar from 1/3 c to 1/2 c; and increased the yeast from 2/1/4 t to 3 t; and my method of assembly. She just has you filling the tins without tossing balls in cinnamon and sugar. I found that a little like a dinner rolls with cinnamon and sugar on top. This is much better.

You can also make these into those gooey pecan rolls. When I do this, I increase the amount of the brn sugar- cin-marg mixture in the bottom of the cup and add chopped pecans.

By the way, this receipe says it makes 12 but I had dough left over for 5 more.

Gotta go folks, its past my bedtime. But first, I think I'll go have one more cinnamon roll.

Nite

Kay

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The cinnamon buns were a huge hit; I don't have a source yet for featherlite mix but I just used two cups of GFPantry White Bread mix and they turned out great, I am going to freeze a few pans for use later. I also had good luck with the frozen crusts from Whole Foods bakery; although I haven't mastered the art of crisping the crust very well yet, it stays just s little soggy in the middle. I've been baking choc chip cookies using the GFP bread mix as a flour substitute and following the Toll House recipe and those have turned out great. My worst part now is trying to find a bread that holds up untoasted for peanut butter sandwiches in the lunch bags. I have baked several loaves of "acceptable" bread that is great when I toast it, or grill sandwiches, but my kids say that the bread isn't the best as a sandwich substitute, but maybe I'll eventually find one that is OK untoasted for use like regular bread, since they don't have access to a toaster, etc., at school. Any suggestions are always welcome! I can't believe the information I'm getting from you guys, it is making my week-end baking marathons a lot better and more productive.

Does anyone have a good source for an egg noodle substitute so I can make soups and home made stroganoff, etc., or will I have to try my hand at making home-made pasta? The Kitchenaide is fast becoming my best friend. I'm using Tinkyada macaroni and spaghetti, but I'd love to find something that resembles the good old noodles for chicken soup.

Thank you again for all the good help and advice!

Sheila

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for sandwiches, my five year old loves Kinnickinick's Italian White Tapioca Rice Bread, I keep it in the fridge instead of the freezer, when I'm assembling the sandwich in the morning, I microwave the bread for about 20-30 seconds, assemble the sandwich then put it in a ziplock sandwich bag. My daughter says this keeps the bread nice and soft for lunchtime.

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I agree with Nini that about the best purchased bread around is Kinnikinnick's Italian Tapioca. We keep a loaf in the freezer all the time for toast, french toast, grilled cheese, croutons, whatever. I don 't make the usual sandwich bread on a regular basis. I make hamburger buns and ziplock them individually in the freezer. Then 30 sec in the microwave and its like they just came from the oven. My husband prefers this for his sandwiches and it sure cuts down on the waste, becuase there is none. But I do need the Kinnikinnick for things that are a little hard to do with a bun.

When I do make sandwich bread, I truly love Manna from Anna. I was cleaning my cupboards last night and was in the kitchen anyway, so I made some. Yummm. Its a lot like a hearty whole wheat or harvest bread with little flecks or seeds in it, probably flax seed. Its the kind of bread you'd love to pile high with ham and cheese and sprouts and lettuce and and tomato and a little mayo....and that's just what I did.

Word of caution on Manna from Anna. One bag made a HUGE loaf. I made it in a 5"x10" airbake loaf pan and it mounded up so high I thought it was going to mushroom for a while, but it turned out great. Next time though I think I'll do 2 smaller pans and stick the second one in the freezer. This loaf is way to big for us to eat while its still nice and fresh so my husband took half of it to an elderly celiac gentleman we know.

Well, Sheila, while there is nothing quite as good as Mama's home made noodles, if you want the kind like we use to buy in the package and boil up, there is a brand called Glutano. I was quite surprised as its a very good substitute. Here in Des Moines, we have about 6 healthfood stores and that is the only brand I

have ever seen that compares to the old egg noodles. I usually add a can of chicken broth to the water I boil my noodles in to give them a little help. For a homemade pasta, I use Bette Hagman's recipes. Let me know if you need one.

To keep pizza from being soggy, I bake it in a pan with the little holes in the bottom to keep the crust crisp. If you are making dough from scratch, bake it first in a pie pan for about 10 minutes then move it the the 'holey pan' to top it and continue baking. If you put the dough straight in the pan with holes, it will ooze into them and you'll never get it out of the pan. I made that mistake with a french bread pan with holes..I tried to shape it after I put it in the pan and it was stuck on that pan like cement. I had to just put the pan on the table and we pulled off chunks to eat.

So glad your cinnamon rolls were a success. My hubby sure likes them.

Can someone on the forum chime in here....did Manna from Anna change the name of her bread. I thought I heard that. I'd hate to give out the name of a product that doesn't exist.

Kay

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I read a previous post about a pizza crust disaster and got good information about pizza crust, someone preferred the Kinnikinick which is now on my order list for my next on-line shipment. Question: does anyone have experience with and/or suggestions for making "frozen" pizzas to replace the ones that used to be a staple in my newly diagnosed celiac disease teenagers' diets? I am not always home when they get back from athletics or activities and we really miss the frozen foods, pizza in particular, that made a quick meal or snack. Is it possible to make a gluten-free substitute for the frozen pizza and if so, do you bake the crust and then add toppings and freeze, or just freeze dough and keep toppings available so they can add toppings and bake? Has anyone had success with that or some ideas for me? Thanks!

Sheila

--2 teenagers, 17 and 16, diagnosed with celiac disease three weeks ago

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I read a previous post about a pizza crust disaster and got good information about pizza crust, someone preferred the Kinnikinick which is now on my order list for my next on-line shipment. Question: does anyone have experience with and/or suggestions for making "frozen" pizzas to replace the ones that used to be a staple in my newly diagnosed celiac disease teenagers' diets? I am not always home when they get back from athletics or activities and we really miss the frozen foods, pizza in particular, that made a quick meal or snack. Is it possible to make a gluten-free substitute for the frozen pizza and if so, do you bake the crust and then add toppings and freeze, or just freeze dough and keep toppings available so they can add toppings and bake? Has anyone had success with that or some ideas for me? Thanks!

Sheila

--2 teenagers, 17 and 16, diagnosed with celiac disease three weeks ago

Dear Sheila.

I am writing for the first time in this forum.

I read about your questions on pizza..

Let me tell you that Kinniknick crust is the raw material for my gluten free pizzas. I produce, freeze and distribute them in Calgary region, and some other areas within Alberta, with excellent reports about taste and tolerance.

They last for at least 5 months if correctly frozen. There are some tips to bake them in order to get the best of the salse, herbs and toppings as well.

Defrost your pizzas until they reach the ambient temperature ( something around 3 hours in general) .

Preheat owen at 300 F.

Place the pizza on a tray at medium distance from baking heather, and wait until borders become yellowish ( Kinniknick dough).

Raise temperature to 400 F. and watch when the border becomes light brown.

At this point, toppings should be cooked, and cheese melting.

You can control the crusty of dough by the colour. Medium brown is recommended for the best among my clients.

Add some oregano and olive oil if you prefer... and enjoy.

Carlos

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Chebe all the way, I love their crusts, and I add the cheese to mine. I like thin crust pizza though, so I alwasy roll it very thin and bake about 10 minutes before adding toppings.

It is so good, we had a pizza party last month and I made about 6 pkgs of Chebe pizza crust, about 12-15 crusts, and NO ONE had a clue they were all gluten free. No leftovers at all!!!!

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nisla - how do you get the kinnikinnick cinnamon buns. when i am on their site i cant find them anywhere. the closest thing i can find is the hot cross buns - but i don't think thats it. do you order them or find them in a store??

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