Jump to content
  • Sign Up
  • Join Our Community!

    Do you have questions about celiac disease or the gluten-free diet?

lonewolf

"de-glutening" A 10 Year Old

Rate this topic

Recommended Posts

My 10 year old son has had many symptoms of Celiac or gluten intolerance. His celiac panel came back negative, but I decided to try him on a gluten-free diet anyway. It's only been 3 days, but I'm seeing some improvements and his teacher commented yesterday that he had a really good day - he has had attention problems. And he hasn't had a bedwetting accident for 2 nights in a row! (This is BIG.)

He, however, is getting angry at the thought of having to do this. I told him it was a 1 week trial and we'd figure out if we were going to continue at the end of the week. I've given him delicious lunches, with extra treats (Kinnikinnick K-too's among other things) and he still complains.

Does anyone have any tips on how to deal with a child this age that hasn't been officially diagnosed? I've made homemade bread, which everyone loved, homemade cookies, taken him out to eat at the health food store and made a homemade chocolate fudge cake, all in 3 days! I've tried to reason with him, explain why we're trying this and pointed out the improvements we're already seeing. What else can I do?

Liz

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I am sorry that it's hard on him. My grandfather got diagnosed when he was 78, so he was pretty set in his ways too, what helped him was sitting down with me and writing down all his favorite foods and finding ways to make them gluten free. Your son is going through a rough time, patience is key, you sound like you are bending over backwards though. I would sit down and say "this is what you are having trouble with, I think this diet may help, we are already seeing changes, don't you think it's worth a try at least?"

and then try to back off. Make good gluten free food and have him help in his food choices, but try not to set yourself up to be a door mat, you don't need to feel guilty you are doing what you feel is best, and that is a parent's job.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I would also gently urge him to pay attention to how much better he feels when he does not eat foods with gluten in them. Hopefully, as he feels better, he will begin to equate gluten with feeling sick, wetting the bed, etc.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest nini

my daughter is only five, but what I do for her when she is having a "feel sorry for myself day" when she gets upset that she can't have what the other kids are having... I take her to McDonalds and let her get a milkshake, french fries or hot fudge sundae... I try to focus on the "normal" kid foods that she can have, like let her have an extra bag of Cheetos in her lunchbox or Funyons, or Lays Staxx... Or I let her have a little bag of M&M's or buy her a Pez dispenser with some assorted Pez candies... I try to remind her that it's really not that bad, and she can have a lot of stuff... just not the stuff with gluten.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well, I made my family go gluten-free last summer. My oldest was 10. He didn't care. Could it be a little bit of your fault? Are you making a big deal about the hardship of it all? Also, 10 is old enough to appreciate health consequences. I read from my Dangerous Grains book to all of the kids. They don't even want gluten at this point. I also rid us of most all dairy, and msg...hello, no Cheetos or bologna anymore. :o Still, no one flinched. Even at giving up ice cream. We got popsicles instead. I think 99% of it has to do with your attitude. You also can't go around apologizing for him being gluten-free. That just sets up a dialogue of him needing to be unhappy in order for you to apologize.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Are you making a big deal about the hardship of it all?

I've been wheat free/mostly gluten free for 10 years, since he was just a baby. He is used to all the gluten-free food, because I make it every day. He is allergic to milk, so he is used to having some restrictions. We already don't go to McDonalds or eat much fast food - our favorite restaurant is the health food store deli. He has surprised me with his anger about this. He is upset that he can't get a "cookie pass" at school, where the kids get to go to the office to pick a cookie out of the jar for good behavior. (I sent some special cookies for him, so this shouldn't be an issue, he is just looking for ways to complain.) He is just finding things to complain about. Really, this doesn't change his diet much, except for the little everyday things like the kind of bread in his sandwich and snacks at school that he now has to think about. He also said that I was "crazy" if I thought his bed-wetting was related and now claims that he doesn't really have stomach aches, he just exaggerates. Arrgghh! I think I just needed to vent. He really is a good kid, I just can't figure out why he's reacting so strongly.

Thanks for your support, I think I'll get Dangerous Grains and read some of it together. Maybe it will convince my whole family!

Liz

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My son was 10 when he was dx, but had been sooooo sick that he didn't care about food anymore. He did have a grieving period, though, which we approached with plain ol' matter-of-factness: "Yes, I know you can't have that. Ever. That does suck. But you will live without chicken nuggets". He made a list of the things he would really miss and we worked on finding tasty substitutes.

But, thinking back, I also remember something else:

Boys that age will just drive their mothers crazy for the entertainment value. Or the mental exercise :)

joanna

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I've been wheat free/mostly gluten free for 10 years, since he was just a baby. He is used to all the gluten-free food, because I make it every day. He is allergic to milk, so he is used to having some restrictions. We already don't go to McDonalds or eat much fast food - our favorite restaurant is the health food store deli. He has surprised me with his anger about this. He is upset that he can't get a "cookie pass" at school, where the kids get to go to the office to pick a cookie out of the jar for good behavior. (I sent some special cookies for him, so this shouldn't be an issue, he is just looking for ways to complain.) He is just finding things to complain about. Really, this doesn't change his diet much, except for the little everyday things like the kind of bread in his sandwich and snacks at school that he now has to think about. He also said that I was "crazy" if I thought his bed-wetting was related and now claims that he doesn't really have stomach aches, he just exaggerates. Arrgghh! I think I just needed to vent. He really is a good kid, I just can't figure out why he's reacting so strongly.

Thanks for your support, I think I'll get Dangerous Grains and read some of it together. Maybe it will convince my whole family!

Liz

Well, then I agree with the other poster who suggests he's driving you crazy for entertainment! Good luck! My 10 year old accepted the whole dietary make-over with hardly a whimper... but he's a royal PITA over a bunch of other issues. And I just know he's doing it to bug me. ;)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Well, then I agree with the other poster who suggests he's driving you crazy for entertainment! Good luck! My 10 year old accepted the whole dietary make-over with hardly a whimper... but he's a royal PITA over a bunch of other issues. And I just know he's doing it to bug me. ;)

Hmmm, I hadn't thought of this. Maybe a possiblity. He is doing a little better today. His teacher told me after school that he is "a completely different child this week". He didn't complain too much today. Although who could with pancakes for breakfast; a chicken sandwich, pretzels, gluten-free snack bar, etc. for lunch, a huge Nana's cookie for a treat at school and tacos for dinner. What could he possibly be missing? The only thing I do feel bad for him about is the once-every-week-or-two trip to Great Harvest bakery for breakfast with daddy. We'll have to find some type of replacement for this before they're scheduled to go again.

Thanks again for your support and suggestions.

Liz

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I just realized that my son's bedwetting is back. It just took a 2 day vacation. He has been totally gluten-free - he's even been responsible at school, which is the only place he's gone besides home. I'm happy about his improved attention span in class and my husband has noticed that he seems more calm in the evenings, but I was hoping that the bed-wetting would go away. Maybe it was just wishful thinking on my part?

Liz

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well bed wetting can be a problem for anybody. His bladder may be a little too small right now. I know other people with kids who do not have celiac disease who are bed wetters and the answer to the problem is time to grow and develop more. The Kinnikinnick donuts are very good. My kids like the chocolate dipped the best. If he likes them extra chocolatey, he can add the Pilsbury chocolate fudge frosting. Or any of the Kinnikinnick flavors are good. The sugar cinnamon are good for making "jelly donuts". I add strawberry jelly and powdered sugar. A link to Kinnikinnick is in my sig. at the bottom.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest nini

my daughter only wets the bed if she's really tired or if there is something bothering her... doesn't have to be related to celiac at all...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


  • Top Posters +

  • Upcoming Events

    • April 17, 2019 Until April 27, 2019
      0  
      April 17-27, 2020   For the past few years many of you have asked us to arrange a River Boat Cruise that will allow us to visit Amsterdam's famous Keukenhof Gardens at its prime time of the blossoming of the millions of Tulips and Hyacinths - alongside the windmills of the Netherlands.  With the participation of a minimum of 20 persons we have arranged an All-Inclusive Cruise from Antwerp to Amsterdam.  This cruise will not be offered to the public until January, 2019 and always sells out quickly.   THERE WILL BE NO MONEY REQUIRED NOR COMMITMENT FROM YOU until we have all the final costs and details.  If you are at all interested check out our website for as many of the details that we have as of this time.   We need your request to be placed on a list of interested participants so we can present that number to Uniworld to show we have the sincere interest in this All-Inclusive Bob & Ruth's Gluten-free Cruise.   PLEASE CHECK OUT OUR WEBSITE FOR THE DETAILED INFORMATION THAT WE HAVE AS OF THIS TIME.   http://bobandruths.com
    • April 24, 2019 04:00 PM Until 08:00 AM
      0  
       
       
       
      Celiac Emotional Healing Support Group
       
       
       
      Again you are invited to join Johnny Patout, LCSW for Baton Rouge's first emotional healing support group meeting to assist those living with celiac disease manage the emotional challenges so many of us face. Most often the emotional disturbances include depression, disinterest in normal activities, insomnia, grief, mood changes, anxiety, inability to concentrate, extreme concern about managing a gluten-free lifestyle and other emotional and behavioral challenges.
       
      The professionals at Jamestown Avenue Counseling Center created the emotional healing support group to give us a safe place to begin to process our emotions and support each other as we heal emotionally while managing celiac disease and the resulting autoimmune disorders.
       
      The emotional healing support group meets every Thursday, 6:00-7:00pm, at the Jamestown Avenue Counseling Center of Baton Rouge. Jamestown Avenue Counseling Center is located at 4637 Jamestown Avenue, Baton Rouge, Suite B-1. Suite B-1 is upstairs.
       
      The support group is free and open everyone managing celiac disease. For more information: emotionalhealingforceliacs@hotmail.com
    • May 04, 2019 Until May 05, 2019
      0  
      Nourished Festival is a family-friendly event with 10 locations across the US. Attendees will be able to sample food, health and beauty products, meet with companies, learn about the most current food lifestyles, receive coupons and attend educational sessions with industry experts. 
      Nourished Festival, managed by The Nourished Group and presented by Enjoy Life Foods, is the largest gluten-free, allergy-friendly and specialty diet event in the US, with 10 locations including.
      ABOUT THE NOURISHED FESTIVALS
      Managed by The Nourished Group, formerly The Gluten Free Media Group, The Nourished Festivals are the largest and fastest growing special diet consumer events in the United States. Started in 2007, the events have expanded from one to ten cities throughout the country. The festivals cater to anyone looking to lead a healthier lifestyle or those who follow a specialty diet due to autoimmune conditions, food sensitivities, allergies or intolerances. Offerings including Paleo, Keto, Plant-Based, Gluten-Free, Allergen-Friendly and Nut-Free products. The events provide the opportunity for attendees to sample and purchase new products, receive coupons, meet with brand ambassadors and attend educational classes with industry experts. For more information, visit http://www.nourishedfestival.com 
       
×
×
  • Create New...