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covsooze

Heard From York About My Tests

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I had a phone message from york to say that the lab quality control had rejected by blood sample so they need to take a new one! I phoned to see why, just in case it was something to do with how the sample had been taken. they said no, it was because my blood had over reacted. I asked what that meant and basically, my blood had reactions to so many foods that they can't believe the results and have to retest :blink: This concerns me a bit about the reliability of the testing... and also about the possibility that I might end up just being able to eat bananas and nothing else :rolleyes: Anyone had a similar experience?

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Interesting... I did Great Plains Labs and spoke to someone from the lab. She said I was one of the most "allergic" people she's ever seen. So... a guess a second test will rule out a faulty sample...but they may find the same results. I was highly allergic to most of the foods on the test. It goes along with a leaky gut, and so many food proteins ending up in the blood stream, and out of the gut, where they belong :unsure:

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My dd had the test from YORK done last summer and they we're still shipping to England. They used a collection tube that seemed to hold a larger amount. I had it done this fall and they test collection kit changed. The pads you had to fill up seemed like they took less blood. Anyway, may dd reacted to an astronomical amount of foods. I thought it would be difficult to incoroporate but it was easier than I thought. On my test this fall I only reacted to two things. I had been on a gluten-free diets for quite a while and the candida diet before that. I suspect I would have reacted to more if I hadn't healed some already. Now if my IgE allergies would improve I would be set! My dd had the test this fall and he reacted to nothing. We're both shocked. :) Hope you find out something soon!

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My dd had the test from YORK done last summer and they we're still shipping to England. They used a collection tube that seemed to hold a larger amount. I had it done this fall and they test collection kit changed. The pads you had to fill up seemed like they took less blood. Anyway, may dd reacted to an astronomical amount of foods. I thought it would be difficult to incoroporate but it was easier than I thought. On my test this fall I only reacted to two things. I had been on a gluten-free diets for quite a while and the candida diet before that. I suspect I would have reacted to more if I hadn't healed some already. Now if my IgE allergies would improve I would be set! My dd had the test this fall and he reacted to nothing. We're both shocked. :) Hope you find out something soon!

Fascinating string! A couple of years before I was diagnosed with Celiac's disease I had allergy testing done. I turned up allergic (none of them real strong reactions) to quite a grocery list of foods including coffee, milk fat, peanuts, filberts, baker's yeast, corn and yes, even rice which is supposed to be the most hypoallergenic food of all. I have pretty much disregarded the allergy testing since all of those foods are extremely common and difficult to avoid and since none of them produced a strong allergic reaction. After reading this tread, however, it makes me wonder if that was largely an effect of Celiac disease/leaky gut.

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Jen - are you still excluding the foods the tests showed up? I won't be surprised if there's lots of foods I've got a problem with - it's because I suspect so many that I thought I'd do the test rather than starting with an elimination diet. However, although I do react to lots of foods, I'm rarely really really sick, so on that score, I think it would be surprising if I react to a lot.

DH is rather sceptical about the whole test - the fact that they can test so many foods with such a tiny sample and the fact that it takes a couple of days for the sample to reach the lab. He thinks they're just money grabbers! I'm hoping there's a lot more to it than that...

So it was interesting to see the progress made by you, Kaseysmum, and your DD. Does that mean you're both feeling better?

Trents - I'm pretty sure I've got a problem with rice too, as I always have a 'sore' stomach when i've eaten it. I wanted to test to confirm that given, as you said, that it's supposed to be so hypoallergenic and everyone says when going on a 'simple' diet it's one of the few foods you can eat. i just really hope I'll still be able to eat potatoes, as not eating them would be the end of the world lol :rolleyes:

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covsooze-

yeah, food intolerances are a bit of a sticky issue. in my experience, no one is totally sure what happens internally as a result of them. obvious gluten can cause damage, so can dairy apparently from some studies...but what about rice or pineapple--which were both high on my list? i think as healing continues in my intestines, the leakiness should begin to cease, therefore reducing and elmininating some of the intolerances--at least some of the more funky ones. however, i expect dairy to probably stick around as casein is a frequent heath culprit like gluten. we'll see--i am going to do follow-up testing eventually and will post those results as a bit of an experiment :) so, you asked if i've eliminated all the foods. for now i haven't...it would mean also eliminating quite a few fruits, veggies, rice, all nuts, beans, eggs and a host of other foods. am i then slowing my healing process because i continue to eat rice? that is the question that hasn't been thoroughly researched. i think they definitely play a role in health, b/c the body is spending much time producing antibiodies, but what does that mean exactly? eventually i plan on giving up rice and even trying to go "allergy free" for a few weeks and seeing if noticeable changes happen. i am also having an endoscopy next thursday, so i'm curious to see how healing is progressing...

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I read today in 'Cross-grain' the magazine of Coeliac UK, that having celiac disease doesn't often lead to other food intolerances. Hmm. I thought lots of people here have other food intolerances, so what's that about? Is there research which links leaky gut, celiac disease and food intolerances?

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I read today in 'Cross-grain' the magazine of Coeliac UK, that having celiac disease doesn't often lead to other food intolerances. Hmm. I thought lots of people here have other food intolerances, so what's that about? Is there research which links leaky gut, celiac disease and food intolerances?

You have to remember that in many countrys celiac is either screened for in childhood or tested for early in illness. Here the average time for diagnosis is 11 years for some much longer. For me it took over 40 years to get a diagnosis. This discrepency in development of other problems may be because they disagonse early enough to avoid complications. Most of us suffering from things like leaky gut and other food intolerances suffered with the IBS or 'it's all in your head' diagnosis for so long that much more damage is done.

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You have to remember that in many countrys celiac is either screened for in childhood or tested for early in illness. Here the average time for diagnosis is 11 years for some much longer. For me it took over 40 years to get a diagnosis. This discrepency in development of other problems may be because they disagonse early enough to avoid complications. Most of us suffering from things like leaky gut and other food intolerances suffered with the IBS or 'it's all in your head' diagnosis for so long that much more damage is done.

Ravenwoodglass and others,

Do you know of people with a leaky gut who have refered pain, like say in their shoulders, hips and knees? I have found that foods in the Night Shade family (tomatoes, potatoes, peppers, eggplant) were giving me lots of pain in my bursa. I can't eat/drink beans, bananas, sugar, coffee, dairy, millet, soy and some other things. I was diagnosed with degenerative disc disease, but my neck stopped hurting as much once I stopped gluten.

Does one see a GI with a leaky gut? My GI didn't seem to know what a leaky gut was. She had never heard of Living Without Magazine or the Gluten Intolerance Group web site. She also told me that being three months off of gluten would not be a problem when doing my biopsy; if there was damage, she'd find it. Well, there was no damage, and she said that I did not have celiac disease. Another GI did a genetic test to see if I have the celiac disease markers since he didn't think it would be a good thing for me to get back on gluten with the symptoms I described. He was a bit sheepish to say that I do indeed have a Celiac gene marker; the one that all Celiacs have, but so does one third of the population and he said not all of them are Celiacs. He did say that it was fair to assume that I very well have celiac disease, but stopped gluten before the damage was bad.

For two years I had gynocological tests done to check out my bloating and abdominal pain, my fatigue, my fuzzy brain. I had also been to Orthopedists, and taken physical therapy, then to a chiropractor all for my shoulder pains during the same two years.

I am not sure what kind of doctor I should see about a leaky gut. GI I suppose, but I'll need a new one in the Durham, NC area. Would a rheumologist be helpful since I have bursitis and tendonitis symptoms? OR do you think there isn't much to be done for my pain?

I'd be greatful for any help from anyone.

Thanks,

Cape

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Celiac is a disorder of the immune system, and will cause your body to attack itself, and cause pain all over your body. I can "cause" a severe flare of my RA just by eating a slice of white bread! Your GI doc should be able to help you with the leaky gut, but finding a good doc is sometimes the hardest thing to do. Leaky gut will cause you to have reactions to food without being allergic. I suggest you stop eating the foods that are causing problems for a couple of months, then add them back in one by one, just to see if the reactions come back after additional healing.

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I read today in 'Cross-grain' the magazine of Coeliac UK, that having celiac disease doesn't often lead to other food intolerances.

That statement at face value makes no sense...of course Celiac would lead to a leaky gut in number of those who go undiagnosed for a period of time. Read the helpful description below on leaky gut... It also mentions some 'signs' of leaky gut. ie. For me, a sign could be the results of my tests, as I mentioned previously. It is unlikely I am naturally allergic to so many foods, but that the allergies are a result of so many food proteins leaking into the intestinal barrier and to the blood stream. Oh, and I would not say all Celiacs necessarily have a leaky gut. I'm sure there are degrees, and that developing it depends on a number of factors such as length of Celiac onset, length of gluten-free diet, personal genetics etc.

The purpose of the gastro-intestinal tract, or gut, is multi-fold. Basically, it:

i) Digests foods,

ii) Absorbs small food particles to be converted into energy.

iii) Carries nutrients like vitamins and minerals attached to carrier proteins across the gut lining into the bloodstream.

iv) Contains a major part of the chemical detoxification system of the body, and

v) Contains immunoglobulins or antibodies that act as the first line of defence against infection.

The leaky gut (or LGS) is a poorly recognised but extremely common problem. It is rarely tested for. Essentially, it represents a hyperpermeable intestinal lining. In other words, large spaces develop between the cells of the gut wall, and bacteria, toxins and food leak in.

The official definition is an increase in permeability of the intestinal mucosa to luminal macromolecules, antigens and toxins associated with inflammatory degenerative and/or atrophic mucosal damage.

If the gut is not healthy, neither is the rest of the body. It is the point of fuel and nutrient entry. If healing is at a standstill look at the gut to see if this is the block. Chemical sensitivity, fibromyalgia and escalating food allergies are among the many problems caused by the leaky gut.

If gas, bloating, abdominal pain, indigestion, alternating constipation and diarrhoea are symptoms, irritable bowel syndrome may not be all that's going on.

The Mucosal Barrier

The barrier posed by the intestinal mucosa is, even in normal subjects, an incomplete one. Small quantities of molecules of different sizes and characteristics cross the intact epithelium by both active and passive mechanisms. The route by which such transfer occurs is, at least in part, dependent on molecular size. Molecules up to about 5000 Daltons in size cross the epithelial membrane of the microvilli. Larger molecules may utilise an intercellular pathway or depend on being taken up by endocytosis entering the cell at the base of the microvilli.

How Does The Gut Become Leaky?

Once the gut lining becomes inflamed or damaged, this disrupts the functioning of the system. The spaces open up and allow large food antigens, for example, to be absorbed into the body. Normally the body sees only tiny food antigens. When it sees these new, larger ones, they are foreign to the body's defence system. So the attack results in the production of antibodies against once harmless, innocuous foods.

Isn't Leakier Better?

It might sound good that the gut can become leaky, because it would seem that the body would be better able to absorb more amino acids, essential fatty acids, minerals and vitamins. For the body to absorb a mineral it does not just slowly diffuse across the gut membrane it must be attached to a carrier protein. This protein hooks onto the mineral and actually carries it across the gut wall into the bloodstream. However, when the intestinal lining is damaged through inflammation these carrier proteins get damaged as well, so now the victim is vulnerable to developing mineral and vitamin deficiencies.

The 7 stages of the 'inflamed’ gut.

1 . When the gut is inflamed, it does not absorb nutrients and foods properly and so fatigue and bloating can occur.

2. As mentioned previously, when large food particles are absorbed there is the creation of food allergies and new symptoms with target organs, such as arthritis or fibromyalgia.

3. When the gut is inflamed the carrier proteins are damaged so nutrient deficiencies occur which can also cause any symptom, like magnesium deficiency induced muscle spasm or copper deficiency induced high cholesterol.

4. Likewise when the detox pathways that line the gut are compromised, chemical sensitivity can arise. Furthermore the leakage of toxins overburdens the liver so that the body is less able to handle everyday chemicals.

5. When the gut lining is inflamed the protective coating of lgA (immunoglobulin A) is adversely affected and the body is not able to ward off protozoa, bacteria, viruses and yeast’s like candida.

6. When the intestinal lining is inflamed, bacteria and yeast’s are able to translocate. This means that they are able to pass from the gut lumen or cavity, into the bloodstream and set up infection anywhere else in the body.

7. The worst symptom is the formation of antibodies. Sometimes these leak across and look similar to antigens on our own tissues. Consequently, when an antibody is made to attack it, it also attacks our tissue. This is probably how autoimmune disease s tart. Rheumatoid arthritis, lupus, multiple sclerosis, thyroiditis and many others are members of this ever-growing category of ‘incurable’ diseases.

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That statement at face value makes no sense...of course Celiac would lead to a leaky gut in number of those who go undiagnosed for a period of time. Read the helpful description below on leaky gut... It also mentions some 'signs' of leaky gut. ie. For me, a sign could be the results of my tests, as I mentioned previously. It is unlikely I am naturally allergic to so many foods, but that the allergies are a result of so many food proteins leaking into the intestinal barrier and to the blood stream. Oh, and I would not say all Celiacs necessarily have a leaky gut. I'm sure there are degrees, and that developing it depends on a number of factors such as length of Celiac onset, length of gluten-free diet, personal genetics etc.

The purpose of the gastro-intestinal tract, or gut, is multi-fold. Basically, it:

i) Digests foods,

ii) Absorbs small food particles to be converted into energy.

iii) Carries nutrients like vitamins and minerals attached to carrier proteins across the gut lining into the bloodstream.

iv) Contains a major part of the chemical detoxification system of the body, and

v) Contains immunoglobulins or antibodies that act as the first line of defence against infection.

The leaky gut (or LGS) is a poorly recognised but extremely common problem. It is rarely tested for. Essentially, it represents a hyperpermeable intestinal lining. In other words, large spaces develop between the cells of the gut wall, and bacteria, toxins and food leak in.

The official definition is an increase in permeability of the intestinal mucosa to luminal macromolecules, antigens and toxins associated with inflammatory degenerative and/or atrophic mucosal damage.

If the gut is not healthy, neither is the rest of the body. It is the point of fuel and nutrient entry. If healing is at a standstill look at the gut to see if this is the block. Chemical sensitivity, fibromyalgia and escalating food allergies are among the many problems caused by the leaky gut.

If gas, bloating, abdominal pain, indigestion, alternating constipation and diarrhoea are symptoms, irritable bowel syndrome may not be all that's going on.

The Mucosal Barrier

The barrier posed by the intestinal mucosa is, even in normal subjects, an incomplete one. Small quantities of molecules of different sizes and characteristics cross the intact epithelium by both active and passive mechanisms. The route by which such transfer occurs is, at least in part, dependent on molecular size. Molecules up to about 5000 Daltons in size cross the epithelial membrane of the microvilli. Larger molecules may utilise an intercellular pathway or depend on being taken up by endocytosis entering the cell at the base of the microvilli.

How Does The Gut Become Leaky?

Once the gut lining becomes inflamed or damaged, this disrupts the functioning of the system. The spaces open up and allow large food antigens, for example, to be absorbed into the body. Normally the body sees only tiny food antigens. When it sees these new, larger ones, they are foreign to the body's defence system. So the attack results in the production of antibodies against once harmless, innocuous foods.

Isn't Leakier Better?

It might sound good that the gut can become leaky, because it would seem that the body would be better able to absorb more amino acids, essential fatty acids, minerals and vitamins. For the body to absorb a mineral it does not just slowly diffuse across the gut membrane it must be attached to a carrier protein. This protein hooks onto the mineral and actually carries it across the gut wall into the bloodstream. However, when the intestinal lining is damaged through inflammation these carrier proteins get damaged as well, so now the victim is vulnerable to developing mineral and vitamin deficiencies.

The 7 stages of the 'inflamed’ gut.

1 . When the gut is inflamed, it does not absorb nutrients and foods properly and so fatigue and bloating can occur.

2. As mentioned previously, when large food particles are absorbed there is the creation of food allergies and new symptoms with target organs, such as arthritis or fibromyalgia.

3. When the gut is inflamed the carrier proteins are damaged so nutrient deficiencies occur which can also cause any symptom, like magnesium deficiency induced muscle spasm or copper deficiency induced high cholesterol.

4. Likewise when the detox pathways that line the gut are compromised, chemical sensitivity can arise. Furthermore the leakage of toxins overburdens the liver so that the body is less able to handle everyday chemicals.

5. When the gut lining is inflamed the protective coating of lgA (immunoglobulin A) is adversely affected and the body is not able to ward off protozoa, bacteria, viruses and yeast’s like candida.

6. When the intestinal lining is inflamed, bacteria and yeast’s are able to translocate. This means that they are able to pass from the gut lumen or cavity, into the bloodstream and set up infection anywhere else in the body.

7. The worst symptom is the formation of antibodies. Sometimes these leak across and look similar to antigens on our own tissues. Consequently, when an antibody is made to attack it, it also attacks our tissue. This is probably how autoimmune disease s tart. Rheumatoid arthritis, lupus, multiple sclerosis, thyroiditis and many others are members of this ever-growing category of ‘incurable’ diseases.

Thanks so much Jen. I really appreciate your posting this description. I feel pretty fortunate that I have a doctor friend who is an Allergist/Immunologist who is interested in my health and everything that I have learned. I hope she will be able to send me to the right rheumotologst.

Bye, Cape

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Cape--hope the rhemy is a good help. Chronic pain syndromes are hard. I have FM and haven't had much help for docs-just want to recommend anti-depressants (which can help some) or pain meds.

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I read today in 'Cross-grain' the magazine of Coeliac UK, that having celiac disease doesn't often lead to other food intolerances. Hmm. I thought lots of people here have other food intolerances, so what's that about? Is there research which links leaky gut, celiac disease and food intolerances?

Yeah,I read that too and thought 'What??!!'

When my hubbie was at his illest before diagnosis of celiac disease he was admitted to hospital for the gastro to run a load of tests.

Meanwhile,I was researching all his symptoms on the internet.

I kept on coming back to leaky gut,but docs don't recognise it.

I am convinced that because my hubbie went many years undiagnosed with celiac disease,this lead to leaky gut.

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