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CMCM

Background Heritage Question

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After reading all my celiac realted books, they keep stressing that celiac disease has a higher prevalence in people with Northern European/Irish/Italian heritage. I'm curious about that....what are your backgrounds on both parents' sides?

I'll start....for me, Swedish on my Dad's side, and on my mom's side Germanic/Russian/English. So I definitely fit that profile.

How about the rest of you?


CAROLE

-------------

Enterolab 1/2006

IgA & tTg Positive

DQ2-0201 (celiac) and DQ1-0604 (gluten)

Casein IgA positive

Mom has 2 celiac genes

Both kids have a celiac gene.

Lots of celiac disease in my family, both sides.

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Part Irish from my mother's side, and Greek from my father's side. I'm not sure where the celiac genes came from.....my mom's entire family has intestinal issues, but my father's family on the maternal side all had stunted growth and late maturity. His mother was only 4'10. So maybe both, who knows. I would love to have them all gene tested, but I don't think I can get everyone to cooperate! All of my kids (only one actually tested +) have gluten reactions and are now gluten free. My brother, me and I believe my late sister (if she was still here to be tested, she was bipolar, and only 4'9 at maturity) have celiac as well. Only my other older sister seems symptom free. So it's very pervasive in my family, which I think is really interesting.


Tamara, mom to 4 gluten & casein free kiddos!

Age 11 - Psoriasis

Age 8- dx'd Celiac March 2005

Age 6- gluten-free/cf, allergy related seizures

Age 4 - reflux, resolved with gluten-free/cf

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Italian--both sides :D


Patti

"Life is what happens while you're busy making other plans"

"When people show you who they are, believe them"--Maya Angelou

"Bloom where you are planted"--Bev

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sweedamickacanuckaho

Sweedish (dad)

Irish (mom)

French-Canadian (dad)

Native American (mom)

Blindingly pale, easily burned, redhead personality :D

Do I fit the profile, or what :P


Alright, don't worry even if things end up a bit too heavy

We'll all float on, alright

Well we'll float on good news is on the way...

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Moms side....Italian/Spanish

Dad's side....Mexican (I dont know if there's anything mixed in with that)

It had to come from my mom. <_<


Rachel

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Wow this is interesting!

We are having my DD tested for this so I will give you HER parents background ;) .....

Me-Irish, Spanish and American Indian

Daddy's-English and Polish

Just from the few responses....your books seem right! I will have to show my husband this as we were just talking about this over the weekend!

Added: I was looking over the responses again and noticed that some said only one side that fit that discripition. I heard a ped. GI speak this weekend and she said that BOTH parents have to carry the gene. Not necessarily have Celiac but carry the gene(s). Interesting how some on here have one parent that doesn't fit the 'mold'. Just some food for thought! I just found this post interesting.


~Kimberly~

Mom to:

DELANEY (1yr) Currently in testing. On gluten free trial diet. Possible allergy/intollerance to gluten/wheat. Allergy to dust mites and boarderline to barely and delayed reaction to wheat. Reactions to oats but no allergy. Gluten free since Feb. 2006

MEGAN (8yr) Allergies to grass, pollen, trees and Oral Allergy Syndrome to carrots. Diagnosed with "reflux"

RYAN (13yr) Outgrown food allergies. Battles hayfever and allergies to animals and diagnosed with "reflux"

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Since the theory is that those areas most recently exposed to gluten/wheat would have the HIGHEST rates of celiac disease, and those areas which have eaten gluten the longest have the lowest rates (because natural selection over several thousand years has been eliminating the celiacs!!!), I would expect the very highest rates to be in Native Americans!!! There was a woman here back in January who was Native American, but I haven't seen her around for awhile. I wonder how many others are celiac and don't know it?

Another interesting thing....the original cultivated wheat did not have nearly as much gluten as the wheat does today. Because of the desirable qualities of wheat in cooking (lightness and puffiness in baking), wheat has actually been developed to have a much higher gluten content that the original wheat did, so I guess people are more affected now.

Anyhow, this is all intereting....


CAROLE

-------------

Enterolab 1/2006

IgA & tTg Positive

DQ2-0201 (celiac) and DQ1-0604 (gluten)

Casein IgA positive

Mom has 2 celiac genes

Both kids have a celiac gene.

Lots of celiac disease in my family, both sides.

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The GI said that North Europian decent where at higher risk. But if you go by your theory with the American Indian then I gave a double whammy there! LOL! My guess is that American Indians had more of a corn intake as their base for grain?

Interesting on the grains evolving. I can see that.


~Kimberly~

Mom to:

DELANEY (1yr) Currently in testing. On gluten free trial diet. Possible allergy/intollerance to gluten/wheat. Allergy to dust mites and boarderline to barely and delayed reaction to wheat. Reactions to oats but no allergy. Gluten free since Feb. 2006

MEGAN (8yr) Allergies to grass, pollen, trees and Oral Allergy Syndrome to carrots. Diagnosed with "reflux"

RYAN (13yr) Outgrown food allergies. Battles hayfever and allergies to animals and diagnosed with "reflux"

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100% German


I am a German citizen, married to a Canadian 29 years, four daughters, one son, seven granddaughters and four grandsons, with one more grandchild on the way in July 2009.

Intolerant to all lectins (including gluten), nightshades (potatoes, tomatoes, peppers, eggplant) and salicylates.

Asperger Syndrome, Tourette Syndrome, Addison's disease (adrenal insufficiency), hypothyroidism, fatigue syndrome, asthma

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

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One-quarter Norwegian and the rest, Scottish, Irish, English.

I think there was another thread juts like this running the last few days, also inspired by that book (I'm waiting for my copy!). Seemed to me that it had gotten to be several pages....check it out!


SUSIE

Diagnosed January 2006

"I like nonsense. It wakes up the brain cells." ~Dr. Seuss

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Added: I was looking over the responses again and noticed that some said only one side that fit that discripition. I heard a ped. GI speak this weekend and she said that BOTH parents have to carry the gene. Not necessarily have Celiac but carry the gene(s). Interesting how some on here have one parent that doesn't fit the 'mold'. Just some food for thought! I just found this post interesting.

Someone can correct me if I'm wrong but as far as I know both parents do not need to have a celiac gene in order for the child to aquire a gene. You only need one Celiac gene to develop the disease and you can get that from either parent.


Rachel

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Someone can correct me if I'm wrong but as far as I know both parents do not need to have a celiac gene in order for the child to aquire a gene. You only need one Celiac gene to develop the disease and you can get that from either parent.

I asked that of Dr. Fine when I got my test results, and he confirmed that you only actually need one celiac gene to have a predisposition. You get one gene from each parent, so you could get one celiac gene, plus a second gene from the other parent that was some non-gluten related gene, so you either could get celiac or you might not, 50% chance I guess.


CAROLE

-------------

Enterolab 1/2006

IgA & tTg Positive

DQ2-0201 (celiac) and DQ1-0604 (gluten)

Casein IgA positive

Mom has 2 celiac genes

Both kids have a celiac gene.

Lots of celiac disease in my family, both sides.

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My parents are portuguese and the other is english/german.

I am wondering more about that GI you heard speak that said both parents have to be carriers of the gene? did they mention what the theory is on that? If not thats cool, just wondering.

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I don't fit the profile. I'm mostly Polish and a little bit German. Unless somewhere down the line there is something else that I don't know about. But how could you not know?


Danielle (Dani)

Diagnosed with Celiac Disease by Dr. Green (gene HLA DQ8) 1/05/06

Diagnosed: Gluten Sensitive through enterolab 11/17/05

Diagnosed: Casein Sensitive through enterolab 3/7/06

Diagnosed: Interstitial Cystitis (IC) 07/26/06

I finally put my picture on because it doesn't look like I'll be eating ANY cake on my Wedding day..........I'm the one in the middle.

Intolerant to: (besides gluten)

Casein

Peanuts (can handle very small amounts)

Any kind of additives or preservatives

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My parents are portuguese and the other is english/german.

I am wondering more about that GI you heard speak that said both parents have to be carriers of the gene? did they mention what the theory is on that? If not thats cool, just wondering.

No no no....I specifically asked Dr. Fine about this once...both parents do not have to give you a gene. You need only ONE gene to have problems. If you have TWO genes (one from each parent) your likelihood of having problems is far greater, however. And there are some people with no identified genes that have celiac disease, so there are obviously some genes that are related to this which have not yet been identified. I think it's about 1% with that scenario.


CAROLE

-------------

Enterolab 1/2006

IgA & tTg Positive

DQ2-0201 (celiac) and DQ1-0604 (gluten)

Casein IgA positive

Mom has 2 celiac genes

Both kids have a celiac gene.

Lots of celiac disease in my family, both sides.

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wow. it's difficult to answer. It's my girls who have celiac, and other people in my family. My mother is Irish/Scotish, and that's the side the celiac is on, so I suppose that's the answer.


Gluten free since 5/06

mommy to Annika(3) gluten free since 5/04 and Kathryn (5) gluten free since 10/05

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Both parents are Scottish/Irish.


luvs2eat

Living in the beautiful Ozark mountains in Arkansas

positive blood tests and later, positive biopsy

diagnosed 8/5/02, gluten-free (after lots of mistakes!) since that day

Dairy free since July 2010 and NOT happy about it!!

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After reading all my celiac realted books, they keep stressing that celiac disease has a higher prevalence in people with Northern European/Irish/Italian heritage. I'm curious about that....what are your backgrounds on both parents' sides?

I'll start....for me, Swedish on my Dad's side, and on my mom's side Germanic/Russian/English. So I definitely fit that profile.

How about the rest of you?

1/2 Irish from my father (who i dont know)

Scottish, Native American.. Mother side

I know who I got my genes from! grrr

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No no no....I specifically asked Dr. Fine about this once...both parents do not have to give you a gene. You need only ONE gene to have problems. If you have TWO genes (one from each parent) your likelihood of having problems is far greater, however. And there are some people with no identified genes that have celiac disease, so there are obviously some genes that are related to this which have not yet been identified. I think it's about 1% with that scenario.

I was trying to explain this to my 16 yr old son (who has symptoms and we want to get tested)

He wanted to know the chances of him having celiac disease.(His Dad has biopsy proven celiac disease-no gene test though)

I (tried) to explain to him that assuming his Dad has one of the two HLA markers that predispose you to celiac disease,he may have passed that gene onto him(but not necessarily so).

And even if he has passed the gene onto him,there has to be a 'trigger' for celiac disease to occur(illness, huge stress etc.)

And of course I (his Mum) may carry the gene too,(I don't have celiac disease).

In which case he would have 2 genes for celiac disease,or 1 or none.

Did everyone follow that? :blink::lol:


It's not enough that we do our best; sometimes we have to do what's required - Sir Winston Churchill

Nikki

Son diagnosed with Coeliac Disease Oct 2006 by biopsy (at age 13yrs)

black_cat.gif

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I was trying to explain this to my 16 yr old son (who has symptoms and we want to get tested)

He wanted to know the chances of him having celiac disease.(His Dad has biopsy proven celiac disease-no gene test though)

I (tried) to explain to him that assuming his Dad has one of the two HLA markers that predispose you to celiac disease,he may have passed that gene onto him(but not necessarily so).

And even if he has passed the gene onto him,there has to be a 'trigger' for celiac disease to occur(illness, huge stress etc.)

And of course I (his Mum) may carry the gene too,(I don't have celiac disease).

In which case he would have 2 genes for celiac disease,or 1 or none.

Did everyone follow that? :blink::lol:

It makes perfect sense to me. Awareness is the key....but knowing the genes from both parents is great because then you really have a firmer idea. Obviously if you have been diagnosed celiac you have at least ONE gene, but if like me, you find out you have TWO genes, then you know for sure your kids have at least one problem gene. For me, the wild card is my husband....being Irish & Norwegian he just might have one, but we don't know. I guess getting one celiac/gluten gene from each parent might mean your likelihood of eventual problems is greater than with just one. Since I have two, I therefore know my two kids have one or the other of my genes, therefore they have the predisposition at the very least and should be watching for it throughout their lives. Lacking any sort of real symptoms now, they certainly don't want to change their diets or even think about it much, but down the road if something triggers symptoms, at least they know where to start looking.....whereas I was kind of oblivious to the idea for most of my life! :D


CAROLE

-------------

Enterolab 1/2006

IgA & tTg Positive

DQ2-0201 (celiac) and DQ1-0604 (gluten)

Casein IgA positive

Mom has 2 celiac genes

Both kids have a celiac gene.

Lots of celiac disease in my family, both sides.

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