Celiac.com Sponsor (A1):


Join eNewsletter


Celiac.com Sponsor (A1-m):



Join eNewsletter
4 4
Daniel Doherty

Depression after Coeliac diagnosis

Rate this topic

Recommended Posts

Hi all,

I finally got my endoscopy results today and have been diagnosed with coeliac disease. My doc told me that it is stage 1, my vili have not been significantly damaged yet so there are no absorption issues yet. So good news it was caught early. I am 24 years old and am lucky that I got diagnosed this early in life.

Even though I expected the diagnosis to be positive, the sadness didn't hit me until now. I am now properly trying to grasp the reality that I will no longer be able to eat any gluten for the rest of my life. I know that in the long run this will be way better for me but I feel so upset. The biggest reason I feel so down is that I will now be that guy who inconveniences everyone when going out to a restaurant. I also have a girlfriend of a different culture and I loved eating her family's food but most of it has gluten. Also, I'm of Italian heritage and now my nonna can't cook all the things she used to for me. I am upset at how this will affect my relationships with those close to me. Food is a big part of my life and it sucks that I won't get to explore food from other cultures or try new things as many foods contain gluten.

How do I overcome this?

Thanks

Daniel

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Celiac.com Sponsor (A8):

Celiac.com Sponsor (A8):


That sucks. I’m really sorry.

I’m obviously biased but I believe we celiacs deserve some coddling. So be gentle with yourself. It’s ok to feel sad about this. You’re experiencing the loss    of not just certain foods but a certain worry-free and blissful lifestyle. That’s a big deal. Non celiacs will never fully understand, but I see you.

Eventually you won’t feel bad anymore. Youre family will get used to making everything out of gluten free pasta, figure out which brand of gluten free bread they like, find modifications for old recipes. (Honestly if you’re positive they should all get tested since it’s genetic). Italian? Lucky you. I know that sounds opposite but I find Italian culture is actually super sensitive about celiac and they are very coddling to me and always find me an alternative because they recognize the tragedy I’m feeling over not being able to eat all their food. Also Mexican food has many recipes are naturally gluten free.

For now, it’s going to feel like a big change so I recommend reading the book “Gluten is my b%$@#.” It’s funny and helpful! Also Reddit celiac forums are super funny and relatable.

Since you’re newly diagnosed and not in so bad shape, you can probably get away with eating gluten free pizzas and sandwiches and pastas in restaurants. Yes, there is cross contamination, but the longer you’re celiac the worse it affects you and if you need a sense of normalcy now is not the time to get overly strict as you’re trying to build better habits. Also, it is better to cook with naturally gluten free ingredients than processed gluten free products. BUT you’re new at this. So go ahead and eat that gluten free cupcake from the frozen food section because you have a disease and you deserve a cupcake. For now, focus on just changing to gluten free and not “cheating” because that’s worse than cross contamination right now. Never NEVER cheat. Processed gluten free brownie is still better than a tiny nibble of a flour death one.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You are going through a normal grieving process.  It will take time to master the gluten-free diet and feel better.  It will take time for your family and friends to adjust, but they will (if not, maybe they are not worth having as friends).  Our whole society is based on food.  But look for other ways to connect.  I invite friends to walk or hike with me or I meet for a cup of coffee.  I host a lot of parties I insuring that I have safe food.  Granted with COVID-19, there are no parties!  Lots more phone calls and zoom meetings.  
 

you can get well.  I have been at this for 7 years and have completely healed from celiac disease and I had a lot of damage.  Maybe sure you get follow-up care.  See a dietician if needed, and learn to cook those Italian and other ethnic dishes on your own or challenge family members to do it.  Personally, I do oversee any cooking my extended family does or I do not eat it.  Cross contamination is serious, but you will learn to work around it.  
 

You can do it!  And if you want a pity party, come here to the forum because we have all been in your shoes.  We get it!  


Non-functioning Gall bladder Removal Surgery 2005

Diagnosed via Blood Test (DGP IgA only) and Endoscopy: March 2013

Hashimoto's Thyroiditis

Osteopenia/osteoporosis -- June 2013

Allergies and Food Intolerances

Repeat endoscopy/Biopsies: Healed

Celiac.com - Celiac Disease Board Moderator

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

In time you can explore gluten-free pastas that may work for you. It will not be nonna'shomemade handmade noodles . I have read some celiacs make their own fresh homemade gluten-free noodles.

I have even worked through a bunch of recipes to find a gluten-free pizza crust the family likes. I did a pesto with white beans too that was quite good. 

As cl said it's normal to have these feeling s. It is a medical diagnosis and a lifestyle change. It takes some time to process physically, emotionally, and socially.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
4 4