Celiac.com Sponsor (A1):


Join eNewsletter


Celiac.com Sponsor (A1-m):



Join eNewsletter
3 3
trents

Why aren't gluten-free breads and pastas fortified?

Rate this topic

Recommended Posts

We all know that one concern we have when eating gluten-free is missing the vitamins that are added to the wheat flour used in mainstream bread and pasta products. These four used in these mainstream products has been "fortified" for many years with some key B vitamins. Why isn't this being done in the gluten-free food product manufacturing world? Surely, it can't be that expensive.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Celiac.com Sponsor (A8):

Celiac.com Sponsor (A8):


I do not think it is the expense.  Many consumers do not want fortified products.  Even the manufacturers are actually cutting back because people are no longer deficient as they once were in the US.    Most of the fortification in the US was ramped up because of the war.  Young enlisted men were not healthy.  Poor and uneducated Southerners lived on corn and developed pellegra (something not seen in Native Americans because they knew how to get the most of this grain).    You can read the history here:

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK208880/


Non-functioning Gall bladder Removal Surgery 2005

Diagnosed via Blood Test and Endoscopy: March 2013

Hashimoto's Thyroiditis -- Stable 2014

Anemia -- Resolved

Fractures (vertebrae): June 2013

Osteopenia/osteoporosis -- June 2013

Allergies and Food Intolerances

Diabetes -- January 2014

Celiac.com - Celiac Disease Board Moderator

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

CL, I read the article you linked but let me challenge you on one statement you made: "Most of the fortification in the US was ramped up because of the war.  Young enlisted men were not healthy.  Poor and uneducated Southerners lived on corn . . . "

The article you linked does indicate malnutrition was an issue with many young enlistees. Here is the relevant paragraph I believe:

"Concurrent with these activities, the nutritional status of Americans was being questioned as a result of the poor nutritional status of young men enlisting for service during World War II. These concerns led to the National Nutrition Conference for Defense in May 1941, convened by President Roosevelt. An outcome of this conference was the recommendation for flour and bread enrichment using the existing standards developed by FDA (Quick and Murphy, 1982)."

I cannot find any statement in the article connecting this problem to "poor and uneducated Southerners" living on corn. The only regional references to nutritional deficiency diseases seems to be in regard to some Canadian provinces.

I grew up in the American South and lived at different times in Virginia, Maryland, Georgia and Alabama. Although I was primarily a city kid I had spent some summer vacations working in the farm fields alongside whites and blacks in the 50's, 60's and early 70's since several relatives were farmers. What I remember was that in the rural areas the people typically did not have much money but they had plenty of good food to eat because they grew it themselves. Nearly everyone had a garden and there was fresh produce for a large part of the year. If you know anything about southern cuisine there are a lot of greens and other fresh vegetables as a regular part of the diet. People in the rural areas had fresh eggs, chicken meat and pork available at all times. In fact, except for the high fat and high sodium content, I would venture to say that rural Southerners probably had better nutrition than most other Americans. Having said that, there would have been some exceptions in the remoter Appalachian areas of the South where there isn't an abundance of arable land.

Actually, your statement may be more true of the inner city neighborhoods of the industrial Northeast and Midwest, where a lot of Southerners migrated, looking for better paying vocations.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ah, sorry for the mis-communication and it was taken from other sources that I did not link.  When I meant uneducated, I was comparing Southerners  who did not process corn the way Native Americans did, thus causing Pellegra. Uneducated might not best be the best word, maybe culturally ignorant is a better choice.   Actually, Poster Boy and Knitty Kitty have provided a lot of information on the subject, but here is one of many articles on the subject:

https://www.discovermagazine.com/health/the-american-souths-deadly-diet

https://www.southernfoodways.org/malnourished-cultural-ignorance-paved-the-way-for-pellagra/

 

I think a Pellegra is pretty rare these days.  It is found in those who are alcoholics and it is possible (rare)  to have it if you are an undiagnosed celiac disease with severe damage, but it can resolve with healing.  I just recently saw this movie, “The Southerner”, in which Pellegra occurred along with many other struggles.  The director was nominated for an Academy Award.  

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Southerner_(film)

Please  do not think I was insulting Southerners.  I come from a stock of hillbillies (Scottish descent) along with some Irish, English and Polish. Those very people who immigrated to the North for better work after the depression.    I am sure I have other ties to many other groups of people.  My family lives in Georgia where I should be visiting if this pandemic was not going on.  Phone calls with my parents or Zoom meetings is not the same as sitting on a screened-in porch with a glass of iced tea and while rocking and talking.  

Edited by cyclinglady

Non-functioning Gall bladder Removal Surgery 2005

Diagnosed via Blood Test and Endoscopy: March 2013

Hashimoto's Thyroiditis -- Stable 2014

Anemia -- Resolved

Fractures (vertebrae): June 2013

Osteopenia/osteoporosis -- June 2013

Allergies and Food Intolerances

Diabetes -- January 2014

Celiac.com - Celiac Disease Board Moderator

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

No, I wasn't insulted at all. I know you better than that by now and realize you would not poke at any social/ethnic class. Your comment just struck me as Hollywood-generated stereotypical. There are other good sources of niacin besides grains that most Southerners, even back then should have had access to and would likely have been a part of their diet such as chicken breasts, pork, peanuts and green peas and sweet potatoes. Some folks (not referring to you) have this image in their minds of rural southerners all being like ma and pa Kettle sitting on the porch all day long tipping up the jug of liquid corn. And there were some of those no doubt.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Trets Et Al,

Cyclinglady has given you good advise.....as she usually does.

I will try and be brief (as least for me).....I have other things I am working on these days...

I have summarized a lot of what I might say in this Posterboy blog post....so I wouldn't have to type everything out every time...

Pellagra shows up in other disease's today not as an independent diagnosis....

See these two articles that show's how it is being diagnosed as Lupus today...

https://www.academia.edu/24915500/Pellagra_in_a_patient_with_primary_Sjogrens_syndrome

https://www.dermatologyadvisor.com/home/decision-support-in-medicine/dermatology/pellagra/

It is commonly found by Dermatologist today because Pellagra means "Rough Skin" in Italian...

Here is a couple nice article's about Pellagra...

http://blogs.creighton.edu/heaney/2013/11/18/pellagra-and-the-four-ds/

https://www.chicagomag.com/city-life/March-2014/How-Wonder-Bread-Became-the-Healthand-then-the-Ill-Healthof-the-State/

The diet for much of the Poor South was Fatback (Meat) Cornmeal and Molasses or the 3 Ms diet leading to Pellagra.

By the 50s through education and more prosperous conditions after the war....the Poor Southern could branch out an afford a more diverse food supply .....that and by then they had enriched white bread that helped put the Pellagra epidemic in remission.

Sometime when I have more time....maybe in August I might write another blog post about it.

It was actually studied in prisons and to a similar degree in insane aslyums.....Prisoners could win there release by taking part in the studies.....and a "Pellagrin" was diagnosed when the "Skin Lesions" of Pellagra appeared...

Here is nice NIH article on it with pictures...

https://history.nih.gov/pages/viewpage.action?pageId=8883184

If you want to read up on it  you can google for "Goldbergers' War"...he was actually being considered for a Noble prize for this discovery....but he died before it could be awarded.....which disqualified him! How Ironic?

I am just trying to be brief tonight due to time constraints...

I hope this is helpful but it is not medical advise.

Posterboy,

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Restore formatting

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

3 3


  • Celiac.com Sponsors (A19):


  • Member Statistics

    • Total Members
      92,004
    • Most Online
      6,255

    Newest Member
    trevorhurst
    Joined

  • Celiac.com Sponsor (A20):


  • Forum Statistics

    • Total Topics
      115,619
    • Total Posts
      969,314

  • Celiac.com Sponsor (A21):


  • Who's Online (See full list)


  • Celiac.com Sponsor (A22):


  • Blog Entries