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In reading an article referenced in Q & A online, this article:  Get Your Super Foods: Eating High Nutrition without the Oxylate from Celiac.com, I noticed the article says Avocadoes have "0" oxalates. This article is dated 2016.  But in an article called "Dangers of Green Smoothies" by Cat Eberling, co-author of "The Fat Burning Kitchen", as published in "Nutrition Watchdog", dated 8/1/20, she referenced a handout from St. Joseph's Health System (Hamilton) called "Oxylate in Food", avocado is listed as somewhat high in oxalates at 19 mg per avocado.  Question:  Which source for the Q & A Answers is most dependable and how is that determination made?

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Hi!  
 

Remember, this is a celiac disease website dedicated to helping those who have celiac disease or gluten sensitivity.  The article was written by a layperson and not someone who is a scientist (but may have to live with a low oxidase diet).  Best to get your information from very reliable sources like medical universities/research centers.  Here is a link to the University of Chicago.  Within that article, there is a comprehensive list which includes avocados which are around 18 mg.  
 

https://kidneystones.uchicago.edu/how-to-eat-a-low-oxalate-diet/

Edited by cyclinglady

Non-functioning Gall bladder Removal Surgery 2005

Diagnosed via Blood Test and Endoscopy: March 2013

Hashimoto's Thyroiditis -- Stable 2014

Anemia -- Resolved

Fractures (vertebrae): June 2013

Osteopenia/osteoporosis -- June 2013

Allergies and Food Intolerances

Diabetes -- January 2014

Celiac.com - Celiac Disease Board Moderator

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Actually Monique Attinger is an expert on oxalates:

https://www.celiac.com/profile/81378-monique-attinger/

and I think you are misreading the article, because she says that avocado oil contains zero oxalate:

Quote

Even better news for those who are following a low oxalate diet: both avocado and coconut oil have zero oxalate!

The paragraph that covers this is talking about oils. 

 I am not sure why @cyclinglady says "Best to get your information from very reliable sources like medical universities/research centers," as many of our site's articles are written by experts, and are reviewed by lay experts.


Scott Adams

Celiac.com - Celiac Disease Board Moderator

Founder Celiac.com

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1 hour ago, Scott Adams said:

Actually Monique Attinger is an expert on oxalates:

https://www.celiac.com/profile/81378-monique-attinger/

and I think you are misreading the article, because she says that avocado oil contains zero oxalate:

The paragraph that covers this is talking about oils. 

 I am not sure why @cyclinglady says "Best to get your information from very reliable sources like medical universities/research centers," as many of our site's articles are written by experts, and are reviewed by lay experts.

This is a celiac website and the OP posted under the forum section and was not respond8ng to the article.  If the OP wants information about oxalates, she should perhaps ask her doctor, consult with a dietician, or find an oxalate (which is related to kidney disease)  dedicated website in my opinion.    While Monique is very knowledgeable, she states she is a layperson and a founder of a support group on social media in Belgium.  Her information is very good.  Maybe I should have referred the OP to Monique’s Website, if it was stated in the article.  
 

You were correct that the OP did not read the article correctly.  I just found a better and more compressive list that showed Oxalate content of avocados.  Like her and everyone else, I grabbed one of the first sites that showed up during a Google search.  To make sure I am giving out good and accurate information, I gravitate to government or university sites over blogs or commercial sites.  Is that a wrong approach?  

My intent was not to disrespect Celiac.com which is a valuable resource for celiacs and those on a gluten free diet.  

 

Edited by cyclinglady

Non-functioning Gall bladder Removal Surgery 2005

Diagnosed via Blood Test and Endoscopy: March 2013

Hashimoto's Thyroiditis -- Stable 2014

Anemia -- Resolved

Fractures (vertebrae): June 2013

Osteopenia/osteoporosis -- June 2013

Allergies and Food Intolerances

Diabetes -- January 2014

Celiac.com - Celiac Disease Board Moderator

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21 hours ago, cyclinglady said:

This is a celiac website and the OP posted under the forum section and was not respond8ng to the article.  If the OP wants information about oxalates, she should perhaps ask her doctor, consult with a dietician, or find an oxalate (which is related to kidney disease)  dedicated website in my opinion.    While Monique is very knowledgeable, she states she is a layperson and a founder of a support group on social media in Belgium.  Her information is very good.  Maybe I should have referred the OP to Monique’s Website, if it was stated in the article.  
 

You were correct that the OP did not read the article correctly.  I just found a better and more compressive list that showed Oxalate content of avocados.  Like her and everyone else, I grabbed one of the first sites that showed up during a Google search.  To make sure I am giving out good and accurate information, I gravitate to government or university sites over blogs or commercial sites.  Is that a wrong approach?  

My intent was not to disrespect Celiac.com which is a valuable resource for celiacs and those on a gluten free diet.  

 

Yes, I would interpret the statement "Best to get your information from very reliable sources" as disrespecting Celiac.com.

Celiac.com articles have covered dozens of different conditions that are directly related to celiac disease (see our Related Diseases and Disorders category), or are important for some people to make a full recovery, as in the case of our oxalate articles. We've NEVER limited our articles to only the topic of celiac disease.

It's unfortunate in your summary of her personal bio, that you left out most of her qualifications, but here is her full bio, just in case you doubt her expertise on this topic:

Quote

Monique Attinger, the main author of this article, works as "Low Ox Coach" to support those who want to follow a low oxalate diet. Both Monique and her co-author, Karla Wiersma are moderators of the support groups, "Trying Low Oxalates", which are found both on Yahoo Groups and Facebook. Through these groups, Monique and Karla have supported more than 18,000 families in their journey to reducing oxalate in their diets. Monique and Karla, with Susan Costen Owens and Patricia de la Garza, are part of International SciBridge, VZW, a non-profit in Belgium dedicated to exploring the role of oxalate outside the kidney. International SciBridge is pursuing a variety of projects, which will move research forward in the understanding of chronic disease.

A quick look at the article you shared, which was written by Jill Harris, and it's clear that it wasn't written by "someone who is a scientist (but may have to live with a low oxidase diet)"

Quote

Jill Harris, LPN
Jill worked at Litholink for 12 years. Her main work there was directing a team of 15 people who served patients of that Jill jpegcompany. Especially, the services included help with the kidney stone reports and with advice concerning diet and fluids. Jill worked with Dr John Asplin and also with me as her medical advisors, and personally interacted with thousands of patients. Jill is in private practice of online kidney stone diet coaching, and collaborated with me in developing the kidney stone diet course, and is a relative.

In any case, hopefully I've answered the OP's original question. 


Scott Adams

Celiac.com - Celiac Disease Board Moderator

Founder Celiac.com

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Cynthia,

Since you are obvious interested in Oxalates in your diet.

I think you would be interested in reading this article.

https://www.hormonesmatter.com/solving-medically-unsolvable-thiamine-oxalates/

You might want to stay away from over consumption of teas as well.

https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/0024320584906258

I hope this is helpful but it is not medical advise.

Posterboy,

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