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Hi all,

I wondered if anyone could give me their thoughts on whether my test results mean it's definitely celiac. The tTG test was positive, and the HLA-DQ8 was also positive. I had an endoscopy this Saturday just gone, so I'm still waiting on the biopsy results for that. But on the paper with information about what they could see, it said "blunter villi in some areas". It also said to start gluten free diet.

I was hoping I could get some thoughts. Thank you in advance :)

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Celiac.com Sponsor (A8):

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Yep, not exactly the club you wanted but you got a lifetime membership. You can check the newbie 101 section to cover some basics, and you will have to start reading labels and getting used to the new diet. It is suggested to not eat out and go to a wholefoods only diet for a while to make it easier til you learn what is safe. You will probably mess up a few times at first we all did.
Feel free to ask if you have any questions.

Diagnosed Issues
Celiac (Gluten Ataxia, and Villi Damage dia. 2014, Villi mostly healed on gluten-free diet 2017 confirmed by scope)
Ulcerative Colitis (Dia, 2017), ADHD, Bipolar, Asperger Syndrome (form of autism)
Allergies Corn, Whey
Sensitivities/Intolerances
Peanuts (resolved 2019), Cellulose Gel, Lactose, Soy, Yeast
Olives (Seems to have resolved or gone mostly away as of Jan, 2017), Sesame (Gone away as of June 2017, still slight Nausea)
Enzyme issues with digesting some foods I have to take Pancreatic Enzymes Since mine does not work right, additional food prep steps also
Low Tolerance for sugars and carbs (Glucose spikes and UC Flares)
Occupation Gluten Free Bakery, Paleo Based Chef/Food Catering

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2 hours ago, Ennis_TX said:

Yep, not exactly the club you wanted but you got a lifetime membership. You can check the newbie 101 section to cover some basics, and you will have to start reading labels and getting used to the new diet. It is suggested to not eat out and go to a wholefoods only diet for a while to make it easier til you learn what is safe. You will probably mess up a few times at first we all did.
Feel free to ask if you have any questions.

Hi Ennis,

Thank you for the reply. I'll check the section you mentioned and I'll have a look at wholefoods. I probably will mess up, but I guess it just takes a bit of getting used to. 

Can blunted villi cause inflammation to show on a blood test? My GP keeps running blood tests because of it. He said if it's still high on the next one, they'll have to investigate further. Thank you again.

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5 hours ago, TheNerd said:

Hi Ennis,

Thank you for the reply. I'll check the section you mentioned and I'll have a look at wholefoods. I probably will mess up, but I guess it just takes a bit of getting used to. 

Can blunted villi cause inflammation to show on a blood test? My GP keeps running blood tests because of it. He said if it's still high on the next one, they'll have to investigate further. Thank you again.

The blunted villi and the blood tests are completely different tests. You can have blunted villi for many reason and the diagnosis of celiac disease is based also on a specific type of white cells that can be seen in the lining of the small intestine.

It is wise to follow up with sequential blood tests (usually yearly) because these will show you are maintaining a gluten free diet. It is pretty hard to keep a completely gluten-free diet without total social isolation and avoiding occasional cross-contamination because there is a chance that contaminants might have been unknowingly introduced but fortunately even with occasional contamination most often the blood tests improve. 

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15 hours ago, docaz said:

The blunted villi and the blood tests are completely different tests. You can have blunted villi for many reason and the diagnosis of celiac disease is based also on a specific type of white cells that can be seen in the lining of the small intestine.

It is wise to follow up with sequential blood tests (usually yearly) because these will show you are maintaining a gluten free diet. It is pretty hard to keep a completely gluten-free diet without total social isolation and avoiding occasional cross-contamination because there is a chance that contaminants might have been unknowingly introduced but fortunately even with occasional contamination most often the blood tests improve. 

Hi docaz,

I know they're completely different tests, I was just wondering if it that can cause high inflammation markers. If not, then it's just more worry about what else could be going on.

I'll check with my doctor about follow up blood tests. I'll keep a gluten free diet as best I can though.

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