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felineaids

Seeking Gum-free Bread Recipe

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In my case, I'd like to renew my request to find a recipe that uses the ingredients I mentioned. There are many people in this forum, and I'm still hoping someone here can help me figure out how to make some kind of bread using these items.

millet or rice flour

baking soda

vitamin C

salt

honey or agave nectar

olive or safflower oil

This has already been done, so it is possible (I just wish the company that did this would have published their recipe before going out of business).

Any replies appreciated, as I'm conintuing to tackle this problem.

Have you tried experimenting with these ingredients? I've made up recipes simply by experimenting - although never using those specific ones. There are some basic principles - for example 2 C flour goes along with 1/3 C oil and about 1 Tbs sweetener and 1 tsp baking soda and 1/2-1tsp salt. Most recipes have similar proportions. Depending on how sweet you want something you can fiddle with the sweetener. Depending on what you're making (pancakes, muffins, flatbread) you'll adjust the liquid. Why don't you try some experimenting?

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Have you tried experimenting with these ingredients? I've made up recipes simply by experimenting - although never using those specific ones. There are some basic principles - for example 2 C flour goes along with 1/3 C oil and about 1 Tbs sweetener and 1 tsp baking soda and 1/2-1tsp salt. Most recipes have similar proportions. Depending on how sweet you want something you can fiddle with the sweetener. Depending on what you're making (pancakes, muffins, flatbread) you'll adjust the liquid. Why don't you try some experimenting?

Thanks for the post. Believe me, I've done tons of experimenting. It just wasn't working out. Gluten free baking is an art, and learning how to mix the right amounts of vitamin C and baking soda with the various ingredients to give the appropriate amount of rise... it's really tough. I hit my library and the internet trying to research options, but everything was so hopelessly geared toward the use of gum that I couldn't find anything that was of help.

I'm going to try the recipe that was just posted, as it seems likely to work -- and the ingredients are definately safe. If anyone has further ideas aboutmy quest for sandwich bread, please let me know. If I ever crack this mystery, or if ever come up wtih a recipe for a viable gluten-free birthday cake, Ill be sure to share those with you.

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Thanks for the post. Believe me, I've done tons of experimenting. It just wasn't working out. Gluten free baking is an art, and learning how to mix the right amounts of vitamin C and baking soda with the various ingredients to give the appropriate amount of rise... it's really tough. I hit my library and the internet trying to research options, but everything was so hopelessly geared toward the use of gum that I couldn't find anything that was of help.

I'm going to try the recipe that was just posted, as it seems likely to work -- and the ingredients are definately safe. If anyone has further ideas aboutmy quest for sandwich bread, please let me know. If I ever crack this mystery, or if ever come up wtih a recipe for a viable gluten-free birthday cake, Ill be sure to share those with you.

P.S. I'm not sure if this was mentioned already, but through my own experimentation, I came up with two simple pncake recipes that use ONLY the ingredients list in my prior post. One is a rice flour pancake, the other is a millet.

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P.S. I'm not sure if this was mentioned already, but through my own experimentation, I came up with two simple pncake recipes that use ONLY the ingredients list in my prior post. One is a rice flour pancake, the other is a millet.

I feel for you, felineaids, as I'm sure this is not easy for you. I don't have any recipes, only a couple more suggestions.

Why not try to contact a research university with a good agricultural/food service program? If you have one nearby, all the better. Many universities pride themselves on their programs. Possibly one of the instructors might take this on as a project for students, or their food service program might take it on as a challenge. You never know...

You might also try making a purchase from special foods, and think of it as an investment to get their recipes. You might be able to consult with the owner, who is a chemist and is the one who developed all their recipes.

Other than that, good luck. You might eventually find someone with a recipe.

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I feel for you, felineaids, as I'm sure this is not easy for you. I don't have any recipes, only a couple more suggestions.

Why not try to contact a research university with a good agricultural/food service program? If you have one nearby, all the better. Many universities pride themselves on their programs. Possibly one of the instructors might take this on as a project for students, or their food service program might take it on as a challenge. You never know...

You might also try making a purchase from special foods, and think of it as an investment to get their recipes. You might be able to consult with the owner, who is a chemist and is the one who developed all their recipes.

Other than that, good luck. You might eventually find someone with a recipe.

I already took those steps, but thanks. I'm really at a point where I'm hoping someone here will be able to help me crack this (or maybe someone will come forward who already has a recipe).

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Did you by any chance try that scone recipe in loaf form?

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I already took those steps, but thanks. I'm really at a point where I'm hoping someone here will be able to help me crack this (or maybe someone will come forward who already has a recipe).

No problem. B) Good luck and keep trying. Hopefully someone will be able to help.

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Hi... I found this recipe in my co-op's magazine and thought that maybe it could be modified...

Orange Cinnamon Bread

1 c. white rice flour

2 T. potato starch

1/2 tsp. baking soda

1/2 tsp. cinnamon

1/4 c. sugar

1 egg

1/2 c. orange juice

Preheat oven to 350. Lightly grease a 4x6 bread pan. Set aside

Mix dry ingredients together. Add egg and orange juice. Mix well. Pour mixture into prepared baking pan. Bake 35 minutes. Allow to cool before slicing.

(I figured that millet could be subbed for the white rice flour, omit cinnamon. Sub honey for the sugar, water for the oj. Not sure on the potato starch or the egg though. )

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Guest Robbin

:) I love cooking challenges, and these ingredients reminded me of an old-time recipe for a cake we called "Weird Chocolate Cake". It was very moist and super simple. The acid/soda/sweetener combination seems similar. It is as follows: 1 1/2 c. flour(sweet rice flour), 1 c. sugar (sub. honey) 1/3 c. cocoa(maybe add 1/3 c. flour for bread?) , 3/4 tsp salt, 1 tsp soda, 1/3 c. oil, 1 tsp. vinegar (this acid would be your citric acid/vit.c) Mix well, add 1 cup water, mix and put in greased, flour dusted 8" square pan for 30-35 min. at 350 degrees. I hope this works out. I haven't tried it with the changes to make gluten-free, (recovering from an eye surgery), but will experiment again soon. If anyone tries this, please share how it worked out!! :) PS: Don't overmix!!

Hi again, I was thinking maybe a combination of honey/agave nectar. Did your bread that you used have both? Perhaps the combination or the agave nectar has the "natural gumminess" needed? I've never used agave nectar, so am not sure of the consistancy of the liquid, but perhaps a mix of the two would be good. Happy cooking!!

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That's an idea! I didn't try it.

I'm in the mood for a dense loaf of bread, so I might try that out, too. I'll post it when I do, however, if yuo try it soon, let me know:)

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This is technologically possible, but I need some help coming up with a viable recipe. If anyone can offer opinions or assistance I'll appreciate it.

Probably not the opinion you're looking for...

I have professional training, and I have done one heck of a lot of baking, but I look at your ingredients list and all I can think is that it's gonna take a lot more than tweaking the ingredients list or techniques to turn that from a heavy, sticky loaf to something breadlike. My culinary instincts say that even though this may be the "ingredients list" that was printed on the package, they may have left something off it.

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Probably not the opinion you're looking for...

I have professional training, and I have done one heck of a lot of baking, but I look at your ingredients list and all I can think is that it's gonna take a lot more than tweaking the ingredients list or techniques to turn that from a heavy, sticky loaf to something breadlike. My culinary instincts say that even though this may be the "ingredients list" that was printed on the package, they may have left something off it.

Thanks for the post. Honestly, this was what they used. This can be done, it's just going to be a matter of finding the right combinations and anounts of the ingredients. One of my greatest challenges is that the gluten-free industry copletely overlooked people with this allergy. From the word go, they started tossing gum into every product and recipe, so isn't much information to work with as I embark on this task.

Hi... I found this recipe in my co-op's magazine and thought that maybe it could be modified...

Orange Cinnamon Bread

1 c. white rice flour

2 T. potato starch

1/2 tsp. baking soda

1/2 tsp. cinnamon

1/4 c. sugar

1 egg

1/2 c. orange juice

Preheat oven to 350. Lightly grease a 4x6 bread pan. Set aside

Mix dry ingredients together. Add egg and orange juice. Mix well. Pour mixture into prepared baking pan. Bake 35 minutes. Allow to cool before slicing.

(I figured that millet could be subbed for the white rice flour, omit cinnamon. Sub honey for the sugar, water for the oj. Not sure on the potato starch or the egg though. )

I want to thank both of you for your recipes. I'll give them a try. On the first recipe, I would need to substitute the potato starch, and I'm not really sure how. Baking soda and vitamin C are used in combination to give the rise in recipes like this. The recipes already calls for some baking soda, whcih I would think could throw off that balance. Any ideas appreciated as I'm working to come up with a substitution.

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Baking soda and vitamin C are used in combination to give the rise in recipes like this. The recipes already calls for some baking soda, whcih I would think could throw off that balance. Any ideas appreciated as I'm working to come up with a substitution.

Did you see my post from a couple days back? I posted the ratio of baking soda to cream of tartar (experimenting with substituting the vit. C for the crem of tartar)

Also I have from my corn allergy information (since baking powder often has corn starch in it) this ratio:

1/2 tsp cream of tartar + 1/4 tsp baking soda for every 1 tsp baking powder (again maybe you could try to sub the vit. C for the cream of tartar)

I'm not a baking expert of course, but maybe this ratio would give you a starting point and you can go by trial and error from there.

Good luck!

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Sift together. Store in airtight container. One teaspoon of this is equal to 1 teaspoon store bought baking powder.

You can try substituting the vit C for the cream of tartar for the acid, although I don't know how you can replace the corn starch. I wonder if it can be omitted?

I don't think it will work to leave out the corn starch as that acts to separate the base from the acid in the container, until such time as you need the base and acid to make air bubbles in your baked goods. You'd need to find another starch -- perhaps finely milled rice flour would work?

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I'm trying to come up with a recipe for sandwich bread. However, the ones I've found thus far all car for one or more types of gum. My allergies are extensive, so I'm including a list of ingredients I know I can work with.

millet or rice flour

baking soda

vitamin C

salt

honey or agave nectar

olive or safflower oil

This is technologically possible, but I need some help coming up with a viable recipe. If anyone can offer opinions or assistance I'll appreciate it.

I love experments, I will try to see if I can make something from this...I have a few questions before I give it a whirl...did they use both millet and rice flour when they made there bread or the honey and agave nectar (don't really know what that is but will try to educate myself) also did they mix the olive and safflower oil? Don't worry if they did it I am sure it can be done....trust me I have made some pretty crazy things in my time, when I didn't use any baking powder or soda...I use to have a recipie that used hydorgen peroxide to make these amazing drop biscets of course they weren't gluten free but all the proxide bakes out just like if you use alcohol in baking. And they were like big beatiful fluffy clouds..mmm. I will try this since I have some millet flour that I need to use up. (I don't use it very often) do you know if they used brown rice flour, rice bran, white rice flour or sweet rice flour...they defenatly have different textures and bake up different? I also have never used vitamin C but I will try to do some research and figure this out before I get started. It might take some time but I love a good puzzle.

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I love experments, I will try to see if I can make something from this...I have a few questions before I give it a whirl...did they use both millet and rice flour when they made there bread or the honey and agave nectar (don't really know what that is but will try to educate myself) also did they mix the olive and safflower oil? Don't worry if they did it I am sure it can be done....trust me I have made some pretty crazy things in my time, when I didn't use any baking powder or soda...I use to have a recipie that used hydorgen peroxide to make these amazing drop biscets of course they weren't gluten free but all the proxide bakes out just like if you use alcohol in baking. And they were like big beatiful fluffy clouds..mmm. I will try this since I have some millet flour that I need to use up. (I don't use it very often) do you know if they used brown rice flour, rice bran, white rice flour or sweet rice flour...they defenatly have different textures and bake up different? I also have never used vitamin C but I will try to do some research and figure this out before I get started. It might take some time but I love a good puzzle.

Thanks for the supportive message. They did use millet and recie flour, but I think they only used one cooking oil -- olive. I only listed safflower because it's another one I can have. They used honey as the "sticky stuff" in place of gum. I think they used brown rice flour.

Thanks again for the note. Hopefully between us, we can crack it.

Ok I found this recipie

so it gives me a few more questions if you know

Grain Free Boston Brown Bread gluten-free

� 1 cup plus 2 Tsp amaranth flour

� 1/4 cup arrowroot

� 1 tsp baking soda

� 1/2 tsp powdered ginger

� 1/2 cup currants

� 1/2 cup brazil nuts

� 3/4 cup boiling unsweetened fruit juice or water

� 1/4 cup honey or molasses

� 1 Tsp lemon juice or 1/4 tsp vitamin C crystals

Oil a 1-pound baking tin. Fill a Dutch oven or stock pot with about 5 inches of water. Bring water to the boil. In a large bowl combine the flour, arrowroot, baking soda and ginger, stir in the currants. In a blender grind the nuts to a fine powder, add the juice or water and blend for 20 seconds. If the ingredients in the blender dont reach the one cup mark, add a little more liquid. With the blender running low add the honey or molasses and lemon juice or vitamin C crystals. Pour the liquid mixture into the flour bowl, stir quickly to blend, do not overmix. Transfer to the prepared mould or can. Cover with a square of foil or wax parer; tie the wax paper securely with a piece of string. Place the mould in the boiling water, cover the pot tightly and steam for 2 hours over a medium low heat. Don't remove cover during this time. Remove the mould from pot and cool for 15 minutes.

have you tried using boiling water when you make your bread? Do you know if they used to bake the bread because this recipie says to steam it...never heard of that but hey it might work?

Thanks for sharing this as well. I don't thihnk this recipe would work, because it would require too much modification (the amaranth, arrowroot, currants, and brazil nuts would have to go). I do appreciate your efforts though, and I'm still hopeful we'll be able to come up with a bread recipe using the ingredients from my other post.

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millet or rice flour

baking soda

vitamin C

salt

honey or agave nectar

olive or safflower oil

Muffins (try as a loaf)

3/4 c. hot water

1/4 c. oil

1/4 c. honey

2 c. rice flour

1/8 teaspoon salt

2 teaspoons baking soda

1/2 teaspoon vitamin C crystals (or 2 Tablespoons lemon juice or vinegar*)

1 teaspoon cinnamon (omit if you need to)

1 t. vanilla (omit if you need to)

375 degrees.

- Combine wet. Mix dry. Add dry to wet. 20-22 minutes.

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Have you looked into whether or not this product is safe for you? Its not a gum (as far as I can tell) and its made specifically for those who cant tolerate xanthan or guar gums.

http://www.allergygrocery.com/Merchant2/me...roduct_Count=33

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I missed a few of your questions in my previous post. Concetrated plant starches have proven a problem, which is why I don't use those. Most of the baking powders I've been able to find were corn or potato based, and some contained gum. Baking soda is a much safer choice for me (and it does the same job, although finding the corect ratios can be really tough).

Flax is like peantus for me -- fairly common for people with this allergy, unfortunately.

Where rice milk is concened, I can't even find one to try. I've researched several kinds and they all contain a heavy gum base and sea salt. If you know of a pure rice milk, I'd be thrilled! I'd like to try it.

Again, I thank you for trying to take this on.

Also, you mentioned flat bread. Have you found a recipe that works? Someone else emailed me on and it hasn't worked yet. I'd be interested to see your forumulation, because there are times when a pita type bread is nice to have.

If you can do cashews I have a recipe you may be able to use.

Cashew-Rice Milk

1/3 c cashew nuts

2 Tbs. honey

1 1/2 cups well-cooked rice

3/8 tsp. salt

2 tsp. vanilla

Approximately 6 cups water

1. Place cashews and rice in a saucepan or microwave container and cover with water. Bring to a boil.

Hint: We generally use left-over rice for this, or we keep portions of rice in the freezer for blending. Cold rie doesn't blend very smooth, so it is important o bring it to a boil with the cashews and water for smooth blending.

2. Place hot cashew and rice mixture in the blender with the remaining ingredients except the remaining water. Turn on and blend thick and smooth, adding a little more water as necessary for efficient blending. Blend for at least 1 minute until no graininess can be seen or felt.

3. Add enough more water to make 5 to 7 cups of milk, depending on the richness desired. A thicker cream can be used over desserts, but thinner is more desirable on cereal or as a drink.

Hint: You may use either brown or white rice. We prefer brown for better nutrition, and though the color of the milk is a shade darker, it is hardly noticable.

From Best Gourmet Recipes from the Chefs of Five Loaves Deli & Bakery by Neva Brackett

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