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I'm suspecting that food intolerances are affecting my health. I know milk is a huge allergy, but allergy testing shows not much else in terms of food. I've been gluten-free since February (to support my celiac son & satisfy my own curiosity). But I still get major fatigue, usually after eating.

Looking into food intolerance, I feel like I'm tumbling down the rabbit hole. I can't just cut everything out for the next 6 months--there won't be any foods left to eat! How do you figure this stuff out? What tests have been most helpful?

Carol

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I'm suspecting that food intolerances are affecting my health. I know milk is a huge allergy, but allergy testing shows not much else in terms of food. I've been gluten-free since February (to support my celiac son & satisfy my own curiosity). But I still get major fatigue, usually after eating.

Looking into food intolerance, I feel like I'm tumbling down the rabbit hole. I can't just cut everything out for the next 6 months--there won't be any foods left to eat! How do you figure this stuff out? What tests have been most helpful?

Carol

Hi Carol

How many test did you have for celiac? my fist one was not that clear so they did 2 biopsy's

and that is how I got diagnosed. However I was doing fine with lactose until early this year that I got very ill from it and now I cannot have no lactose at all. As far as the intolerance with the food I personally have gone on a day to day tests wit the food I eat I do follow the Glute-free diet, but I still get very ill fromother foods that my body cannot tolerate anymore like even a salad with no dressing now gets me sick. Another thing you can do is follow the labels and see if there is a health store in your community they usually carry Gluten free products, here in NY I have Trader Joes and they carry alot of Gluten free products so that is my way of having a healthy stomach. anyway best of luck anymore questions we are here to help one another.

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My docs suggested an elimination diet - I tested negative (which is about 30-50% accurate for true food allergies anyway) to most of the foods, and a food diary. I went to plain meat and veggies until I felt better which only took a week or less for me then I started adding food back in - with the diary and comments about symptoms, you can really start to see patterns.

It is a huge pain but well worth it in the end.

Personally, I had problems with fatigue for several years (about 5), however, I was on Lyme disease meds for about 6 months AND I eliminated almost all sugar and limit my carbs, because I noticed a problem with those, and my energy is better, not as good as it could be but better.

Lots of things can cause fatigue - food, lupus, RA, lyme, etc. meaning it could be a lot of things.

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I'm suspecting that food intolerances are affecting my health. I know milk is a huge allergy, but allergy testing shows not much else in terms of food. I've been gluten-free since February (to support my celiac son & satisfy my own curiosity). But I still get major fatigue, usually after eating.

Looking into food intolerance, I feel like I'm tumbling down the rabbit hole. I can't just cut everything out for the next 6 months--there won't be any foods left to eat! How do you figure this stuff out? What tests have been most helpful?

Carol

Hi Carol;

The allergy ellimination diet is the only way to determine food intolerances. They will not show up on an allergy test as they are not technically allergies. Allergies cause anaphylactic reactions (immediate) and intolerances cause gastrointestinal, fatigue, joint & muscle problems, malnourishment, etc. It is just easier to use the term allergies because it is universally understood. If you go on the elimination diet for 2 weeks, then reintroduce gluten, dairy, soy and so on one at a time you will have a heightened reaction & know right away what you are intolerant to. It was so surprising that by just giving your body 2 weeks away from whatever is poisoning you & then reintroducing it will cause a mega-reaction. It really doesnt' take that much time; it will be so worth it!

Dee

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I did a "forward" elimination diet. You can think of two flavors of elimination diets:

1) take one thing out of your diet for two weeks, then add it back in and see how you're feeling.

2) take almost everything out of your diet for two weeks, then add one thing back in and see how you're feeling.

The first doesn't make for a very controlled test, as most scientists will tell you. Too many variables in the way.

Honestly, if we could find perfect, guaranteed intolerance-free, liquid nutrition, we'd want to avoid all foods! And make sure to 'mass balance' our calories (and fat/protein/fiber/carbs/sugar, and major vitamins/minerals). But that's just too much to undertake without massive planning, a massive budget, and MAJOR time to dedicate to the process. (Tradeoffs are everywhere! :-) )

So, getting as close to the second one as possible is the way to go. You take time to plan it, though, all the way through, because it's hard physically, and harder mentally. The first thing you know to elminate is the eight major allergens. After that, it gets much harder, because there isn't a lot of consensus on what foods are most often offenders in intolerances. When I did mine, I had a list of a dozen things that I *could* eat for two weeks, four of them being lamb, olive oil, salt, and potatoes. There is a bit of help out there, and you'll want to spend some time researching it and planning what you want to eliminate (berries, citrus fruit, beef, corn, rice, chocolate are all definitely out), and more specifically figureing out what you want to leave in. Then you figure out what you want to add back in. The first thing I tested was dairy, because it was so important to me. (Turns out I can't have it.)

The key is that you need to have eliminated the vast majority of foods for a while (I say two weeks) so that you have gotten everything out of your system and had time to recover so you know again what it feels like to be healthy. Then you have to consume the offending food long enough (I say a week) so that, if you have a mild intolerance, you get enough that you go past your limit. Then, if the food is a problem, you have to get off it again long enough to get back to a healthy stead state before you can test another new food.

Yes, this is a long and laborious process. You will find it speeds up when you're dealing with foods that you're fine with. And you can, in theory, try a faster process, but it's not quite as rigorous. A faster process is less frustrating/annoying/PITA, though. :-) (I can promise, however, that after this sort of elimination diet, the gluten free diet is a cakewalk.)

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Honestly, if we could find perfect, guaranteed intolerance-free, liquid nutrition, we'd want to avoid all foods!

The first time I ever heard of the elimination diet for testing dietary sensitivities was probably 35 years ago. At that time the person who wrote the article I read was recommending beginning it with a 4 day fast.

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Hi Carol

I'm sooo tired today from anemia (blood loss), but I wanted to add this ...

In MHO, allergy tests are a good place to start, but they are inconclusive. For example, my daughter has anaphylactic reactions to foods and environmental allergens. When they tested her for food allergies, she had a positive skin test for PB, etc. BUT negative blood test results for all. However, her doctor told her to avoid PB because one of these times it could kill her. She's 18 and loves it, so she eats it roughly every two weeks at this point without having any life threatening symptoms. Scarey, huh ?

I know the elimination diet is overwhelming at first, but it works. I just wanted to add to what has already been said. My doctor recommended I do the following in addition to removing the common food allergens -

1 - Stop eating anything I already knew upset my stomach on any regular basis. For me this meant coffee, colas, fried foods, spicy foods, acidic foods, etc.

2 - Stop eating red meat, leafy greens and fruits and veggies with skins because they are typically tough to digest. I knew all meats were a problem for me, but not the other two.

3 - Add papaya, mangos and pineapple because they contain natural digestive enzymes. Papaya works the best on me. A whole one will clean me out without any cramping.

4 - Find a diet that I knew my stomach could always handle. For me that's potatoes, rice, apples, asparagues, etc. But everyone is different. And go back to it everytime my stomach gets upset. Having a calm stomach and adding one new thing at a time will help you figure out what food is causing problems.

I know this is a lot of work, but it is worth it in the long run. I figured out that soy causes my stomach to cramp because now I know when my stomach is cramping. Whereas before it was in spasm all the time.

Good luck to you ... Marcia

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How about testing through York Labs to see what foods I am intolerant to? Is this a accurate way to determine which foods are the culprits? Then these foods can be eliminated. I ate a meal last night which I prepared with chicken, marsala wine, mushrooms, garlic, parlsley (chicken was dredged in quoina flour). After a short time, the "burning" pain started. I've been eating very few foods, trying to keep my stomach calm. Soon as I add something with a little "spice", it hurts.

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Looking into food intolerance, I feel like I'm tumbling down the rabbit hole. I can't just cut everything out for the next 6 months--there won't be any foods left to eat! How do you figure this stuff out? What tests have been most helpful?

Carol

I HAVE to plug the Lame Advertisement test. I didn't even know what an intolerance was before I got severe GERD. My doc recommended avoiding tomatoes and spices, but I have always eaten those things, so it made NO sense to me to avoid them. How can something you have ALWAYS eaten just start causing problems all of a sudden?

I read an article in Figure magazine about food related problems, and different tests, including the Lame Advertisement test. I went to an allergy specialist who gave me an elimination diet (which included bread, so that would have never work, now would it!) and asked him about the Lame Advertisement test. He said it was houy. Well, he was wrong! The test showed intolerances to gluten, gliadin, sweet potato, strawberries, (about 7 other things), and I cut those things out of my diet. I had to research the gluten and gliaden part, and that is what led me to celiac, and then to my primary doc for the tests for that. (also did tests through enterolab)

But now that I am gluten-free, when I have a strawberry or one of the other things on my Lame Advertisement list, I get acid reflux, and a headache. It amazes me what food can cause! (You would think I make some commission for sending people to Lame Advertisement dot com, but I don't. I just really believe in what they do.)

My test, a comprehensive panel, was 350.00. I don't know if I would have even noticed some of the things that they tested for, so I am glad that I did it instead of an elimination diet. I am not against the elimination diet, I just know that it wasn't the course for me. I hope that my experience was helpful for you! Tiff

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I HAVE to plug the Lame Advertisement test. . . . My test, a comprehensive panel, was 350.00. I don't know if I would have even noticed some of the things that they tested for, so I am glad that I did it instead of an elimination diet. I am not against the elimination diet, I just know that it wasn't the course for me. I hope that my experience was helpful for you! Tiff

Thanks, Tiff. Another friend of mine had the ELISA/ACT test done last year, which sounds similar, and it has helped her tremendously. They test for 300 items (including foods, pesticides, metals--bunch of stuff). They also provided a rotation diet specific to her results, and they get into pH balance and other detox recommendations. I think she spent $600 on the testing (would have been even more but her homeopath, a long-time friend, waived her fees). They also told her that if she eliminated the things she was sensitive to, she would likely be able to add them back in gradually after a year or so.

I wish insurance covered more of this type of thing. Seems like it could save them and us a lot of money in the end. However, for now I'm tracking everything I eat on a homemade database, and it's already helping me to see patterns. I want to get my allergist's opinion on the intolerance testing (she understands intolerance more than most doctors). My frugal nature might just win out, though. I think I can handle the strict elimination diet. I've been cutting things out for so long, the emotional attachment to food just isn't an issue anymore. I'm determined to feel consistently healthy, because even my informal eliminations have reminded me what that feels like. And I'm a planner at heart, so it might be fine.

Carol

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. . . . The first thing you know to elminate is the eight major allergens. After that, it gets much harder, because there isn't a lot of consensus on what foods are most often offenders in intolerances.

Tiffany,

How did you decide what to eliminate and what to leave in? Looking at my friend's ELISA/ACT results, beyond the 8 major allergens, there seems to be a huge variety of things that cause people to react (I should mention that they look specifically at delayed reactions, not clinically allergic reactions). So even if I do a ton of research, how helpful is it? That seems to be the tricky part.

My own observations give me a starting point. Beyond the milk & peanut allergies, sugar is a definite problem, even in small amounts (real maple syrup, watermelon, Gluten-free Casein-free baked goodies)--and even though I'm borderline hypoglycemic, it's a different type of reaction. I'm also suspicious of soy and corn. I've already been gluten-free for 3-1/2 months, and that seems to have helped, too. My mom feels so sorry for me, depriving myself of so many yummy foods. She doesn't believe that I'm truly thrilled to start feeling like myself again after almost 15 years of feeling drugged. (Or maybe she suspects she has some of the same intolerance issues, but doesn't want to go there.)

I don't know much about detox remedies, other than that there are a lot of them out there, but I wonder if that could clean the bad stuff out of your body and shorten the time needed for eliminating foods? Or if it could shorten the resulting symptoms when you accidentally eat something you shouldn't? When I have sugar, for instance, I'm weak & tired for a couple of days. I'd love to shorten that. Likewise for the brain fog my son gets after accidental glutening.

Carol

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figureing out what to get rid of - a lot of online research and listening to my body. it really was *literally* twelve foods for two weeks, including salt and olive oil. I don't remember the sites I found, or what else I "allowed" myself (I know that pepper was out, and only one fruit was in).

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If I take out the red meat, that would only leave peanut butter for a protein. Is pork a red meat? I need to do the elimination diet, so I was going to eat beef, peas, green beans, celery, carrots, kiwi, banana and milk (which I had previously tested and found no problems with) for 2 weeks, then start adding in other foods one at a time. This starts tomorrow. I just got back from the sleep doctor, and while I have apnea if I sleep on my back, I do not when on my sides. I already sleep on my sides, so I am looking for whatever is causing my fatigue. The elimination diet is next in my quest to feel better! Any tips and advice is very welcome!

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I'd keep the beef out - pork and lamb are two options. No on the kiwi, though, as that is a potential bother for many people. I would also leave out the milk - the thing is that you don't know what's contributing to problems or not in a complicated system such as a diet, so leaving in something with as big a problem as milk is tricky. Now, if you've been totally completely 100% healthy with no symptoms of anything at all while having milk, then that's one thing, but if you're just saying that you don't think milk's a problem because you took it out for five days and didn't notice you feeling any better... that's not good enough in this case. I believe you may also want to leave banana out - it's also prone to sensitivities (particularly in it's cross reactivity in those who are latex sensitive, for instance).

Don't forget that you need to be very careful about any spices you use. Pepper is a common irritant (regular black pepper), as are a number of other spices. You may also want to be very careful about the types of oil you use, if any - most vegetable oil, for instance, has soybean oil in it.

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I know the subject is food intolerances, a few months ago I took milk out of my diet because I was having some trouble and since it has improved, to replace the milk I drink Lactose free milk, Lactid milk, it doesn't seem to cause any trouble does anyone else use this and sense my symptoms improved does that mean its a Lactose problem rather than casien?

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Thanks, Tiff. Another friend of mine had the ELISA/ACT test done last year, which sounds similar, and it has helped her tremendously. They test for 300 items (including foods, pesticides, metals--bunch of stuff). They also provided a rotation diet specific to her results, and they get into pH balance and other detox recommendations. I think she spent $600 on the testing (would have been even more but her homeopath, a long-time friend, waived her fees). They also told her that if she eliminated the things she was sensitive to, she would likely be able to add them back in gradually after a year or so.

I wish insurance covered more of this type of thing. Seems like it could save them and us a lot of money in the end. However, for now I'm tracking everything I eat on a homemade database, and it's already helping me to see patterns. I want to get my allergist's opinion on the intolerance testing (she understands intolerance more than most doctors). My frugal nature might just win out, though. I think I can handle the strict elimination diet. I've been cutting things out for so long, the emotional attachment to food just isn't an issue anymore. I'm determined to feel consistently healthy, because even my informal eliminations have reminded me what that feels like. And I'm a planner at heart, so it might be fine.

Carol

The Lame Advertisement test works differently, but I understand what you are saying. I was tested for 350 foods (I think) for less than 400.00. I am not sure how the process is different, but Lame Advertisement talks about ELISA and the differences, so I know that it is not the same test. Anyway, good luck with the elimination diet! It is good that you have already been doing that. When I did my Lame Advertisement test I had never heard of any of this stuff (just the elimination diet that my "allergy specialist" who knew nothing about food allergies recomended, that allowed nearly 30 foods, so looking back, I am glad that I didn't do that).

If I take out the red meat, that would only leave peanut butter for a protein. Is pork a red meat? I need to do the elimination diet, so I was going to eat beef, peas, green beans, celery, carrots, kiwi, banana and milk (which I had previously tested and found no problems with) for 2 weeks, then start adding in other foods one at a time. This starts tomorrow. I just got back from the sleep doctor, and while I have apnea if I sleep on my back, I do not when on my sides. I already sleep on my sides, so I am looking for whatever is causing my fatigue. The elimination diet is next in my quest to feel better! Any tips and advice is very welcome!

I have a problems with green beans. Just wanted to throw that out there. Do you know that you are ok with them? Because I am "green bean intolerant"!! LOL :lol:

(I just read over my post, and it looks like I am making fun of intolerances...I am not! I really am green bean intolerant!)

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I read one encouraging thing in my friend's ELISA results. They say that people who follow their specific plans for eliminating offending substances, detoxing, and restoring alkalinity "have often been able to restore tolerance and overcome most or all of their reactivities."

Maybe these intolerances won't last forever if we take care of ourselves now. I'm hopeful.

Carol

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I read one encouraging thing in my friend's ELISA results. They say that people who follow their specific plans for eliminating offending substances, detoxing, and restoring alkalinity "have often been able to restore tolerance and overcome most or all of their reactivities."

Maybe these intolerances won't last forever if we take care of ourselves now. I'm hopeful.

Carol

I have also read that, with the info from my Lame Advertisement test, that some intolerances will go away because some of them are caused by eating too much of the given food, and that causes the body to become less able to digest and breakdown these foods. But, I do not believe that is that case for all of them, as some of mine are foods that I hate (go figure) so I know I have not eaten too much of them!

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I don't know the name of the exact tests I have had for allergies and intolerances. I have had pin prick tests since a very young child and they did change over the years. The last pin prick test showed that I was no longer reactive to trees and grass, but we had left the midwest 2 years prior, and I now live in the desert. Many people that move here become allergic to the desert. So, I was tested by pin prick for that and then about 3 years ago, they ran the blood tests for food and desert. I am still not allergic to the desert, but my foods have stayed constant now, but have greatly worsened. The last one and a half weeks, I have had my small oxygen tank sitting by my desk where my nebulizer is. I am very careful, but something is really flareing up. My problem is that I am too thin now and have dropped 2 pounds in 5 days since I have had to cut out any candy because of the corn. I used to use non dairy sweets (candy) for weight gain. And now that is not an option. I also carry an Epi-Pen when we go out to eat anywhere. I have only had to use one three times in a restaurant and once I had to go directly through my clothes as there was no time to get to a bathroom. To me gluten is easy compared to the others. If I drop another 4 pounds I will be in a size 6 and that is not an option. My GP trusts me enough to be smart enough to know when I need pregnesone and so I have a refillable RX for a Medrol Pac. I had to fill it 5 days ago and it has helped some. I wish everyone luck who is trying to deal with food allergies of intolerances.

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I have a problems with green beans. Just wanted to throw that out there. Do you know that you are ok with them? Because I am "green bean intolerant"!! LOL :lol:

(I just read over my post, and it looks like I am making fun of intolerances...I am not! I really am green bean intolerant!)

I was green bean intolerant too on my IgG & IgA tests. Go figure!

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I'm intolerant to legumes--and for the longest time did not know that green beans WERE legumes! I used to eat them all the time--not anymore :o

I didn't know that either, wow, all this time! That makes sense as to why on my tests I came up allergic to kidney beans, pinto beans, green beans, as well as other things....but as far as the beans, I thought what in the world? I ate green beans pretty much everyday, the other beans hardly ever. Maybe they are in the same family and I just cross reacted or something.

Allergies/intolerances are so crazy!

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I didn't know that either, wow, all this time! That makes sense as to why on my tests I came up allergic to kidney beans, pinto beans, green beans, as well as other things....but as far as the beans, I thought what in the world? I ate green beans pretty much everyday, the other beans hardly ever. Maybe they are in the same family and I just cross reacted or something.

Allergies/intolerances are so crazy!

I also showed allergic to string beans (gr beans), kidney beans, navy beans and soy beans. The test I had doesn't show all the beans. I'm ok with peanuts which go with the soy bean family. The test I had was the IgG and IgE panel. Only about 100 foods though. Spelt came up quite high and I'd only had that once or twice, didn't like it. Also asparagus which I only had a few times a year. Banana and pineapple were also on the list which I'm hoping to add back in at some point. I have to pay attention to my son whose breastfeed. It seems he breaks out with eczema over things I'm not allergic to (like cocoa). Considering dropping all beans/legumes also (except lentils).

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