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dh204

Celiacs In France?

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Hey everyone,

Probably a long shot, but just curious as to whether or not there are any celiacs living in France?

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Hey everyone,

Probably a long shot, but just curious as to whether or not there are any celiacs living in France?

I had the same problem so I started a support website :D

http://linuxmigrations.hd.free.fr/glutenfree

I am really busy right now so the site is a little stalled (hope to be free in 2 weeks) but I collect everything.

We also have a forum etc. the idea being to swap tips and things...

Its only been up a few weeks in total but I am getting about 30 people a day at the moment..I just need more people to post their things since the idea is to build a community not just a static website.

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Hey everyone,

Probably a long shot, but just curious as to whether or not there are any celiacs living in France?

Hi,

am a (possibly) newly diagnosed coeliac living in Paris. Would love to hear from others here.. I'm from Australia and am finding it difficult going in France to follow a non-standard diet. In Australia there are heaps of vegetarian restaurants, some vegan restaurants and even some coeliac restaurants. Specific dietary requirements are common, and everyone knows someone who doesn't eat something. In France they're perplexed by vegetarians (what would possess you?) and anything more unusual than that is unheard of. After reading some other postings by people it seems that it's not so difficult to come to France as a coeliac tourist, but there's almost no support for coeliacs actually living here, and the community awareness is zero. I normally eat lunch in the canteen at work (in fact at my work it would be almost socially unacceptable not to do so) but it's so difficult to be sure that something is gluten free. I try to explain the gravity of the situation to the servers when I ask about the meal choices each day, but I'm not really convinced they take it that seriously. I even had a chat to the manager of the canteen one day, and his reply was "I run a canteen, not a hospital".

I guess this posting is a bit of a whinge really, but starting out as a newly diagnosed celiac is hard enough without it being in a foreign (and not terribly supportive) country. It's especially difficult since my friends here are all new (I've only been in France since Jan 05) and it's very socially uncomfortable to present a long list of things you can't eat to people you hardly know when they invite you out...

The really frustrating this is that I'm sure that there are lots of other coeliacs around (after all this is a city of several million people!!), but I haven't even managed to find a single place to buy gluten-free bread. I know in Australia it would be so much easier than this!!

Anyway if there are any others out there who are successfully managing to be coeliac in France, I'd love to hear your suggestions. I also go on lots of business trips, and I haven't even started to work out how to manage the business lunches/dinners thing yet..

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It is hard to expresss just how important lunch is with colleages.

In fact if you have a restaurant de enterprise they are bound by law to proivde you with sometihng so far as I know but actually getting them to do it is another thing.

The big problem I had was being expected to eat with people at lunch or business meetings and total lack of acceptance of celiac disease. You can kiss progression in any French company goodbye if you don't go to lunch with your boss and if you try and explain its basically down to you and your boss.

Its really a case of damned if you do or don't.

I tried several times to explain this to my boss and just got a look like telling him I was an alien from a small planet in another galaxy... when I tried to subtly mention it to the company Dr. he talked about repatriation meaning redundancy ...

You can try explaining, be forceful etc. but obviously the more forceful you are with an employer the less you will progress. Ultimately they can just repatriate you unless you have a real French contract and make you redundant back home.

I started a new thread on the GFP forum for employment issues.. Im working on how to post things right now...

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Well at least your email helped me to realise things could be much worse than they are. My colleagues are all perplexed, but at least they're sympathetic (I think the idea of never eating another pain au chocolat is so painful to them they can't imagine the such a lifestyle being imposed on them). None of them had ever heard of "gluten" before, much less coeliac disease. I had to explain what gluten was and mostly they've taken it as not eating bread. Eating at my restaurant d'entreprise is difficult, but I think it is possible on most days (even if it means that I eat exactly the same meal every lunchtime for the rest of the time I work here!). I have also lost a few arguments with some servers who refused to serve a meat/vege sauce that normally goes with couscous with rice instead. I explained as much as I could in detail about being intolerant and they just point blank refused. It was a surreal experience. Now I keep some food in my office (big no no in France!) for the days when there isn't anything I can eat.

Luckily for me I'm employed on a local CDI (ie. permanent) contract, so they have no possibility of repatriating me. And my boss is a nice person who would never consider doing such a thing. But it still feels like I live in a world of croissant-eaters in which the only options are to eat the croissant or go hungry..

Will have a look at the employment thread.. I don't know how to manage being coeliac with all the travelling for work that I do, and especially since I often go to new places where I don't speak the local language. My experience is that unveiling a long list of things that you can't eat stresses you potential hosts significantly - especially after they realise that things like sauce thickeners or anything that comes pre-prepared is potentially dangerous. They feel stressed about taking a risk serving me any food at all, and they feel stressed about me bringing my own food..

My dream is to have some extremely prominent figure (for instance, the president of the US!) with a well known food intolerance. Then at least it would get some air play.. and maybe it would reduce the number of people who think we're just crazy and hyperchondriac..

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Bonjour,

I moved to Southern France from the States last year. The transition can be extremely difficult, especially for a newly diagnosed celiac - the local fresh bakeries on every corner dont make it any easier.

Eating out in France can be difficult and risky but it can be done. I have found the local thai restaurants to be some of the best. Plus, the French dont use pesticides and mainly use local produce so the freshness and quality is fantastic. If you go to a local French resturant most will have some items on the menu that are acceptable for Celiacs but it takes time to learn the various items and what they contain. Dont depend on the restaurant staff to give you an informed decsision on what is gluten-free. I always find it most difficult if a group chooses a small "tea shop" or a place with premade items. These are very difficult to manuveur around b/c most will offer tarts, sandwiches, pizzas or even premade salads with dressing. These are the times when I am most uncomfortable b/c I will refrain from eating and then have a snack later (which I always carry in my purse).

The local biological stores usually have a good selection of gluten-free items and the snacks and pastas are very good but I have not found a bread that I like. There are some in the UK that are much better and you can have them shiped over. I have searched for fresh gluten-free bread at the biological bakeries but none can guarantee there is no cross contamination. Once I tried one of the gluten-free corn loaves but it was like trying to eat a brick so I gave up on my search. But you would think that in all places the Celiac bread lovers of France would offer fresh baked gluten-free bread.

I can not imagine a company in France that is not willing to accomodate the gluten-free diet but I am not actually suprised. I know that some of the larger companies in France subsidize the costs of employees lunches and those that choose not to eat at the local cantina can receive food vouchers to use elsewhere, such as the local groceries. I would definately speak to the company and see what they can do for you. If you dont get much assistance you can become truly French and "grieve"

A bientot,

Theresa

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Hi everyone,

I can recommend a chain of health food stores called "Les Nouveaux Robinson". There are 3 of them in the Paris area: Montreuil, Boulogne, and Neuilly. I've been to the ones in the first 2 suburbs, but not in Neuilly yet. I can tell you that the one at Boulogne is much much nicer than the one at Montreuil, and I think it even has a larger selection of gluten-free products. I definitely recommend the brand Schar and I do NOT recommend anything that is "France Aglut" The Schar bread and pastas are especially good as well as the Grisini (breadsticks). There is another large health food supermarket called "Bio Markus" but unfortunately it is located WAY out in the suburbs...you HAVE to go in a car. It's near the Leclerc near Fontainebleau. I can't remember the name of the village but it's in the département 77.

Don't even get me STARTED on French people and Celiac/wheat intolerance/allergies in general. For some reason, even if you just have regular outdoor allergies people look at you like you're crazy. Forget about trying to explain the gluten thing. I just tell everyone that I am allergic to wheat and they kind of look at me quizzically. It was very hard though, because where I was working before, they used to go out and get all these fancy pastries every other week and when I never had any they all looked like they were mildly insulted. Which is weird because there were a lot of non-french people there too. Also, my friends and my boyfriend and his family seem to have a hard time with this gluten intolerance thing. It took a really really long time to explain everything to my in-laws and i'm still not sure they understand. But my mother in law really tries to make an effort when she cooks for the family but gluten is hidden in SO MANY THINGS and it's impossible to know unless you know how to read the labels. I don't know if you guys have noticed, but even things like ham, lardons, sauces, soups, potato chips, nuts, etc are all off-limits. As are most of the desserts too. :(

It's super hard at first especially as a foreigner, but if your french is good and you know how to explain (in French) to people AND you can read all the ingredients on everything, then it's ok. I've been here now for almost 2 years straight (although I do get glutened quite frequently -- even in Asian restaurants where they smother everything in what I suspect is soy sauce).

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I definitely recommend the brand Schar and I do NOT recommend anything that is "France Aglut" The Schar bread and pastas are especially good as well as the Grisini (breadsticks).

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Sorry, my other post somehow was sent before I was ready? I must have pushed the wrong button.

I agree the Schar products are excellent! I have not been impressed with the France-Aglut but the Vali-form brand is not too bad, but I still prefer Schar. There is also a corn pasta I sometimes buy at my local biologic that is very good but I cant remember the name - its off by its self and not one of the gluten-free brands.

I still have not found a bread that I really like. I dont eat it often but I would love to find something for convience for picnics and camping trips. Does anyone knows of any good breads in France that dont reguire heating? I have given up on finding fresh gluten-free bread thats edible from a bakery in France - but still hopefull that someone will fill this need.

Theresa

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I could but I honestly don't see why I would bother.

I get 30-40 people a day checking my gluten free site but not a single one has bothered to even leave a single message or make a single post on the forum. People have visited the resto's but noone has bothered to even post a comment back.

Several people have mailed me for help which I reply to yet none have ever bothered to post the question on the forum or even post a comment back afterwards.

I guess I have just put too much faith in human nature.

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I am sorry that no one has taken an active role in your website. Maybe it will just take more time.

It is not as useful for myself b/c I am located in the Toulouse area and seldom venture to Paris, except for the Airport - which can be a Celiac nightmare if you are hungry.

Theresa

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Hi -

i eventually gave up my quest of finding freshly baked gluten free bread at a bakery. absolutely NO PLACE makes fresh gluten free bread. everytime we go to a bakery my boyfriend and i always ask about gluten free bread and everyone looks at us like we're freaks. once at a boulangerie the woman behind the counter recommended some bakery in the Marais, but she didn't know the name or address and I haven't been able to find it. not to mention that the Marais is really far from my apt. my boyfriend and i are considering buying a breadmaker.

the only kind of gluten free bread available here that i have tried and is not necessary to toast is "Bon Matin" bread from Schar. It comes in a package of 4 (small) rolls of bread and it is very good; kind of sweet. i've never seen it at les nouveaux robinson, though, only at that place i went to near my boyfriend's parents' house. (btw, i think the village is called dammarie-sur-lys; the bio markus is right next to a darty). and yes, the valpiform products are not bad at all, but they are quite expensive, so I tend to get the spaghetti. once in awhile at the monoprix you can find these little cake/cookie things called "financiers". they are usually made only with rice flour. i have not had a reaction to them yet, although it says on the label that they products are manufactured in a place that also manufactures gluten. i also came across some cookies at the local monoprix that don't appear to have any wheat in them (i can't remember the name of the brand, but i'll check when i go back in a couple of weeks). they have these chocolate macarons which are very good. the labels are not very specific, though, it says that there is starch but i don't know if it will cause a reaction. i tried them and i don't think i had a reaction.

gfp, sorry about your website. i just registered today; i didn't get around to doing it before (i have been very busy working on a new portfolio and working on my paperwork for my upcoming visa interview). you just need to be really really patient. a lot of people in france are not really that into the internet, but it's slowly evolving (i remember how last year, most of my friends still had a dial-up connection; and even though most of them have high speed internet, they rarely check their emails). french people really don't seem to be into the habit of going onto forums and stuff and even fewer discuss things like allergies (this is of course a very wide and general statement, but it is based on my in-laws and my friends here). oh, you might want to check out this forum called "aufeminin.com" i am embarrassed to admit that i lurk sometimes on the boards (it's very girly; lots of posts about marriage and relationships with guys and stuff) but there is a board called "santé - allergies/eczema" and i've seen the occasional (like once every 6 months) post by people who suffer from celiac. you might want to put a post there about your website.

btw, my bf and i were watching tv a few weekends ago and we happened to stop on..i think it was france 2 or france 3. it's a health and nutrition show (can't remember the name) but they dedicated the entire show to allergies and intolerances. i was so happy that they mentioned celiac and gluten intolerance. they interviewed 2 people: a guy who was shopping at what i am guessing must have been a carrefour or leclerc. he said that he was a celiac and he calculated that about 90% of the products in the french supermarket are off-limits. then they showed him walking down the aisles with a giant caddy and like 1 tube of toothpaste and 1 pack of cashew nuts. the other interview was a family somewhere in mid or southern france with a daughter who is a celiac. i guess she was about 12 or so, and no one else in the family is celiac, but they order products online (breads and pastas and stuff) and talked about how they kept a separate gluten free space in the kitchen just for her and how they even have special pots and pans just to cook her food. they also showed another woman having an exam with a gastroentorologist who said she might just be suffering from celiac disease. it turned out to be a real eye-opener for my boyfriend because they listed some of the symptoms and reactions to gluten that celiacs suffer and i have a few of those symptoms, so he could tell i wasn't full of B.S. too bad his parents didn't get to see the segment....:(

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Thanks for all the info about foods in France!

I am not sure if I should but after reading the labels it looks like we can eat the packaged chicken and turkey? It usually lists the dextrose and other preservavites as derived from potato . I am really disappointed that I can not find a ham in France that doesnt contain ble and I am leary of the sausauges.

Because I thought they were safe I also have been eating Lay's plain potato chips and also Doritos white corn chips but not very often. But I cant get an answer from the manufacturer for anything in France.

I have a really nice vendor at our local outdoor market that I call "the olive man" He has the best selection that are so wonderful and also has a great variety of fresh nuts that are not salted or flavored (so I hope they are safe)

The Schar bon matin rolls are pretty good but they are a little sweet for sandwiches and they tend to crumble. but they make a great breakfast snack with some jams. For lunches, I guess I will just stick to my corn tortillas I have sent over.

I know that many ice creams are safe in France but I eat the Hagan-Daza Vanilla b/c I think its okay. I also eat some of the non flavored, non sugared yogurts because the yogurt in France is so much better than the states. But although I have not had a reaction, I am not completely certain they are safe.

Glad to know there are other English speaking Celiacs in France. I believe there is a Celiac organization in Paris but nothing in Toulouse.

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There is a site (in French) for celiacs. Intended of course for french celiacs.

http://www.afdiag.org/index.php

It's pretty good; it lists all the foodstuffs that you can and can't eat and information about how to get reimbursed by the French social security (unfortunately seems to be worthless for me as you need to get an intestinal biopsy that is of course positive; in order to be reimbursed for all the wheat free foods. I have not had this biopsy done as I was previously diagnosed as having a wheat allergy in the US and I have been off wheat and gluten (well, I try) but I'm not willing to reintegrate wheat into my diet). There's also an index of websites of companies that deliver gluten free products. Quite helpful, although I haven't tried ordering yet.

Yes, Lays potato chips are definitely wheat free as are Kettle Chips. Except that Kettle Chips are really expensive. Also just realized yesterday while shopping that lardons have wheat in them! But oddly enough, I don't think I have had any reaction to them. I only now just realized that I bought a large chunk of ham from the traiteur section of the supermarket and I hope it doesn't have wheat in it. Sausages are weird; the gourmet ones usually don't have any wheat and I think it's usually ok if you get them in a specialty store or at the market stalls that sell those fancy sausages. Dried sausages are usually out, though. It's so strange though because I never realized that deli hams and stuff have gluten in them -- I only just found out a few months ago. When I tell my boyfriend that hams and stuff here have wheat in them he was really surprised.

When I was working I usually had lunch at this salad bar (very American concept where you can pick the ingredients for your salad). Otherwise I usually just brought in leftovers or salads that didn't need to be reheated.

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I'm going to be in Paris for two weeks in July (the 8th through the 25th) and both those websites posted here are fantastic, thank you. If anyone would be interested in having lunch during that time please let me know. I probably won't be posting here during that time, but my email addy is elle871@yahoo.com. I forget exactly where my friend is, but she's in the south of Paris, though I'll be wandering all over the place while she's at work. Would love to hang out with a Celiac in Paris. My french is ...ok.. I read and understand it better than I speak it, but I'm trying to get better :)

Elonwy

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There is a site (in French) for celiacs. Intended of course for french celiacs.

http://www.afdiag.org/index.php

It's pretty good; it lists all the foodstuffs that you can and can't eat and information about how to get reimbursed by the French social security (unfortunately seems to be worthless for me as you need to get an intestinal biopsy that is of course positive; in order to be reimbursed for all the wheat free foods. I have not had this biopsy done as I was previously diagnosed as having a wheat allergy in the US and I have been off wheat and gluten (well, I try) but I'm not willing to reintegrate wheat into my diet). There's also an index of websites of companies that deliver gluten free products. Quite helpful, although I haven't tried ordering yet.

Im curious as to what they have inside the members section. Im naturally suspicious of sites where you have to pay to see inside the useful part (though the cost of membership is reimbursable from SECU).

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Elony,

I hope you have a wonderful visit to France. The sunflower fields are preparing to bloom in the South so I imagine they will be beautiful around the country side of Paris in July. Also, I hope you have a chance to visit a local market because the produce is better than any in the states! They dont use pesticides and have a lot of local products which adds to the freshness so ENJOY!

Theresa

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Im curious as to what they have inside the members section. Im naturally suspicious of sites where you have to pay to see inside the useful part (though the cost of membership is reimbursable from SECU).

I looked a bit more on that site last night (I have a terrible habit of speed-surfing a site, bookmarking, and then really checking out the site 3 months later) and followed one of the links to another site by another association of celiacs. On this other site they talked about the first one and mentioned a little about membership. I am under the impression that the paid part is where you get updates on gluten free foods, celiac research, etc. I still don't have the sécu yet so I probably won't join right away.

BTW, while browsing both sites' lists of what you can and can't eat I was a little surprised to see that they noted that lardons are safe. Because like I mentioned in an earlier post, I only just found out that lardons contain "dextrose de blé" a few days ago!

Oh I also forgot to mention before that there is a company here called "Les Biscuits d'Antoine" that makes gluten free cookies (they are VERY good...they are these fancy gourmet cookies and they have flavors like chocolate-orange (with real orange bits!), lemon, and rose. I think you can order stuff from them online, but I know that you can also find their cookies at Les Nouveaux Robinson. I highly recommend these cookies; they are so good that my boyfriend will sometimes steal a bunch when I'm not looking!

On another note, I wanted to mention that my bf's mom was on a mission last year to get me fresh wheat free bread from the bakery (I don't know if I am gluten intolerant or wheat intolerant, but I know that oats don't bother me and possibly rye, so she wanted to get me rye bread without wheat flour). She asked the local bakery in their village if they could make pure rye bread without the wheat and she said they looked at her like she was crazy. So she had to explain how her daughter-in-law had a wheat intolerance and they looked at her like "okay...she's a freak...bread without wheat flour?..." They said if she wanted to have bread with only rye in it and no wheat she would have to special order it 1 week in advance and they couldn't insure that it wouldn't be cross-contaminated with wheat flour.

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I looked a bit more on that site last night (I have a terrible habit of speed-surfing a site, bookmarking, and then really checking out the site 3 months later) and followed one of the links to another site by another association of celiacs. On this other site they talked about the first one and mentioned a little about membership. I am under the impression that the paid part is where you get updates on gluten free foods, celiac research, etc. I still don't have the sécu yet so I probably won't join right away.

Yep, I do the same, especially if its in another language and you prefer a quiet time to make sure you follow everything.

BTW, while browsing both sites' lists of what you can and can't eat I was a little surprised to see that they noted that lardons are safe. Because like I mentioned in an earlier post, I only just found out that lardons contain "dextrose de blé" a few days ago!

I don't want to publically knock AFDIAG but .... if you phone them up they will tell you point blank no safe resto's exist in Paris ... no recommendations etc. etc. I don't know how long they have been around but its more than 5-6 yrs and they haven't achieved this yet so I wonder what they do with the membership money.

As it happens one of my members contacted them and mentioned my site and I got visitied by the Marie the next day to one specific page (in french) and again 10 minutes later by the French telecoms regualtory body ...

I get the idea they are not very happy with my little site.... and tried to have it closed down under the Loi de Toubon ... which is why I have disclaimers that the site is NOT for French nationals ... otherwise it has to be trranslated 100% and they have been known to close down anglo businesses just for a gramatical error like missing an accent or spelling mistakes.

Oh I also forgot to mention before that there is a company here called "Les Biscuits d'Antoine" that makes gluten free cookies (they are VERY good...they are these fancy gourmet cookies and they have flavors like chocolate-orange (with real orange bits!), lemon, and rose. I think you can order stuff from them online, but I know that you can also find their cookies at Les Nouveaux Robinson. I highly recommend these cookies; they are so good that my boyfriend will sometimes steal a bunch when I'm not looking!
Cool, i found another set which have recipees for gluten-free stuff but they use a normal backery to preapre theirs so they are not gluten-free ...

http://www.micheletaugustin.com/

Unfortunately their website uses flash and I don't!

I'm told they have recipees but I refuse to visit sites that use flash so I can't confrm this.

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Cool, i found another set which have recipees for gluten-free stuff but they use a normal backery to preapre theirs so they are not gluten-free ...

http://www.micheletaugustin.com/

Unfortunately their website uses flash and I don't!

I'm told they have recipees but I refuse to visit sites that use flash so I can't confrm this.

It's a really slow site. I couldn't find any recipes there, although I tried to click every link.

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Earlier this year I sent a letter to AFDIAG and they were not at all helpful. They did not offer any information and only directed me to their website and membership - it really bothered me that they were not interested in assisting a Celiac but I was not sure if it might also have something to do with being a foreigner?

The Tourist office in Toulouse was much more helpful in helping me find biologic stores and also gave me the name of a biological restaurant in Toulouse.

I just went back to their site to review. I have not come across any lardons or hams that are safe? I have found one brand of German Sausage that can be purchased at LeClerc or Carrefour. It doesnt list any wheat or gluten products but also doesnt say it doesnt have them in it - its the only one I have used and so far it has not bothered me. But the site also say that yogurts with fruits are not safe? But according to Yoplait some are.

Also Schar's site has some good recipes. My daughter loves the Crepes I make with the Schar mix and thinks they are better than the French ones.

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On the Yoplait issue, do anyof you know if YOP! is safe? Thats the yogurt drink they have in France. I got absolutely addicted to that stuff the last time I was there, but that was pre-gluten-free. I have emailed Yoplait but haven't gotten a response.

Thanks

Elonwy

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I also went to the michel et augustin site and i didn't find any recipes either...:(

I did look under their products and they have one kind of cookie made from buckwheat, but all the other stuff has wheat in it.

Most French bureaucratic staff are not helpful at all (I'm in the middle of the visa process, so believe me, I know!). Although I don't think that AFDIAG are part of the government. But to generalize broadly, most services in France are not that helpful. There just isn't the same level of customer service here as there is in the anglophone countries (or anywhere else for that matter). So no, I don't think it was because you are foreigner that didn't want to assist you. They're just not as friendly and hospitable compared to Americans. I wouldn't take it personally...I could write a giant book about the French and their social customs.

As for sausages and other meats, at my monoprix (well, really it's an inno) they have these really good sausages that don't have gluten (I don't think -- I have never had a reaction to them). They're kind of expensive, but I think that well-made sausages (I mean fancy gourmet foods) usually don't have wheat in them. (Also, I am talking about the kind of sausages that you cook, not the dried ones). Most things that are made industrially here have wheat in them. By the way, I stopped by the inno to get some stuff I forgot last time I went and I stumbled across a teensy section that has gluten free products! It's near the diététique section, and they are all at the very bottom on a dusty shelf (I guess not that many people buy gluten free stuff). It's a brand I have never tried before called "Allergo" or something like that. The gluten free products there were only couscous (some sort of rice couscous that looks a little weird), macaroni, and chocolate bars. That was pretty much it. I didn't get anything because I just brought some cash and I didn't have enough on me. Anyway the other thing I wanted to mention was that here, some products, even if they are gluten-free, will not note it on the packaging.

I don't know if Yop is gluten-free. I also wouldn't expect a response anytime soon from the Yoplait people unless you emailed Yoplait US. I am automatically suspicious of anything here that has added flavors. I guess you could read the ingredients...but I don't think they are required by law here to list allergens in their foods. I would suggest that you could maybe try calling Yoplait when you get to France, but almost all customer service numbers are billed at a higher rate than a normal phone call (don't get me started on that!) and hope you get someone on the phone who knows what gluten is.

Oh, also I saw one of the posts in the gluten-free travel room, someone went to a great restaurant in Paris called Le Reminet in the 5th. Apparently the chef/owner's wife has celiac, so they will accomodate all dishes to be gluten-free. I haven't tried the restaurant yet but if anyone else knows of it or has been, I'd be interested to hear about it.

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Yeah "The customer is always right" is not really a slogan found in France, lol.

Yop appears to be gluten-free in Canada and the UK, but I still have nothing on France, and I don't trust anything non-country specific. I love that stuff.

Elonwy

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