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Will an official CELIAC diagnosis effect one's insurance in any way? My husband is a cancer survivor and we are slaves to our current insurance (and it's premiums) whether we like it or not as a result. If that were the case with celiac, I would think it would be MUCH better to stay well under the radar and not get that official diagnosis on paper anyway. Anybody with experience on this?

P.S. What does an endoscopy cost, anyway??

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Will an official CELIAC diagnosis effect one's insurance in any way? My husband is a cancer survivor and we are slaves to our current insurance (and it's premiums) whether we like it or not as a result. If that were the case with celiac, I would think it would be MUCH better to stay well under the radar and not get that official diagnosis on paper anyway. Anybody with experience on this?

P.S. What does an endoscopy cost, anyway??

Hi,

We do have insurance. I was Dx'd last year through a positive biopsy. After going on the diet and recovering I have not had any further medical costs. The difference between me and someone who took the gluten-free diet on their own and feels ok is that it cost one of us money for both of us to arrive at the same result. If I were you I would not worry about insurance costs unless I went on the diet and it did not help. You do not need an official Dx to go on the diet. When I go to a health food store to get some of the expensive baked goods it doesn't cost me any less than the "undiagnosed" person. I don't stay on the gluten-free diet because I was officially diagnosed. I stay on it because it makes me feel better. If being on this diet seems to be the answer for you then save your money and use it to buy food you can eat. Good luck.

Tom

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To add to Tom's reply:

If you are dx's with Celiac, they is a tax deduction, providing that you provide the "difference between a regular loaf of bread, vs a gluten free (cost difference). It must be documented to be deductible.

As with all specific dietary foods, celiac specific foods may be deductible on your taxes, but only the difference in cost, as stated.

To answer your question, although vague, and endoscopy will cost between $1,000 or $2,000 with out insurance. Without insurance, you may want to talk to your doctor (or sorry, doctors, don't talk to the real people).... his/her financial people.

Hope this will be helpful.


Lisa

Gluten Free - August 15, 2004

"Not all who wander are lost" - JRR Tolkien

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Guest nini

I was denied insurance by several companies after my dx showed up on my charts. I don't have insurance now and am at the mercy of Medicaid. In my personal opinion it is better to stay well below the radar and just get yourself healthy by being gluten-free. If going gluten-free helps you, then you have your answer. If bloodwork was positive you def. have it. My daughter's pediatrician advised me to not pursue an official dx with her because of insurance being denied (pre existing condition)... so her "official" dx is gluten intolerant, but that won't cause her to be uninsurable. I actually had insurance companies tell me that because of the Celiac dx, I was considered uninsurable. Even when I appealed and told them I was much healthier after dx, than before... ugh.

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I was denied insurance by several companies after my dx showed up on my charts. I don't have insurance now and am at the mercy of Medicaid. In my personal opinion it is better to stay well below the radar and just get yourself healthy by being gluten-free. If going gluten-free helps you, then you have your answer. If bloodwork was positive you def. have it. My daughter's pediatrician advised me to not pursue an official dx with her because of insurance being denied (pre existing condition)... so her "official" dx is gluten intolerant, but that won't cause her to be uninsurable. I actually had insurance companies tell me that because of the Celiac dx, I was considered uninsurable. Even when I appealed and told them I was much healthier after dx, than before... ugh.

That's what I was actually wondering about. I definitely have good insurance now and it would cover any procedures for diagnosing, I'm sure. But what I wanted to know was if insurance rates would likely go up with "celiac" on the record and if I would end up nearly as uninsurable as my husband if we ever were dropped or just wanted to change companies for better rates. You've answered that.

I realize that once I get really gluten free, I will likely feel much better and not have any increased insurance needs because of it. I just don't want to jeopardize my position for anything else I might need insurance for.

I heard about the tax deduction. It is tempting. I am self employed and keep a lot of records anyway. But I imagine it would be a lot of trouble.

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Some people here who have had to get private health insurance, rather than a group plan under an employer (which means they can't do "pre-existing condition" clauses the same way at all), have had trouble with having celiac on their record, and some have had absolutely no trouble what so ever. It varies. Keeping it off your record *can* make a difference in some other things too, however, such as when you're at a hospital (though you'll be awake enough to argue your case if you're eating solid food), or when you're considering things like the pneumovax (recommended for celiacs).


Tiffany aka "Have I Mentioned Chocolate Lately?"

Inconclusive Blood Tests, Positive Dietary Results, No Endoscopy

G.F. - September 2003; C.F. - July 2004

Hiker, Yoga Teacher, Engineer, Painter, Be-er of Me

Bellevue, WA

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I have to get private insurnace and I don't even qualify because I have migraines and take meds for them (though I have much fewer now that I don't eat gluten). Anyway, I am currently on short term insurance (for 12 months) and am hoping if I don't go to the doctor at all this year and don't fill any prescriptions through my insuance, I'll qualify for an actual policy next year. So I'm thrilled I don't also have any gluten diagnosis on my record.

I hate insurance. It's gotten totally expensive and ridiculous. I feel like I'm being held hostage between my car, home, and health insurances - sure wouldn't want to *use* any of them, or god forbid my rates go up or I get dropped. It's not there to be *used*, for pete's sake.

:angry:

Stephanie


Diagnosed by food challenge, 10/04

Gluten-free since 10/04

Gluten-sensitive genes: HLA-DQ 1,3 (Subtype 6,9)

Interstitial Cystitis, 7/07

Fibromyalgia, 6/11

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I've been wondering about this too. I've got an Enterolab test kit on the way for my daughter. I've been tossing back and forth between what's more important; an official diagnosis so that I won't get any *($# from anyone in my family for putting my daughter on a gluten-free diet, or being able to keep her under the radar just in case our insurance gets scared about it, or it keeps her from doing something in the future because someone else gets weird about it being on her record.

I guess that answers that for me now. Enterolab is the way to go.

I know we're all hoping in the next five years or so, when this stuff is more commonly understood, that it won't be such a big decision whether or not to get a few tests.

Nancy


The person who says it cannot be done should not interrupt the person who is doing it.

~Chinese Proverb

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A person, who was trying to sell health insurance to the company

I work for, told me that since celiac disease is auto-immune related that

she would not be able to insure me and that I should stick with what

I have. <_<


alicia

been gluten-free 4 yrs.

too many food allergies to list!

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Make sure to look into the HIPA laws, in many cases employers and insurance companies can't deny you coverage if you've been continually covered.


Alright, don't worry even if things end up a bit too heavy

We'll all float on, alright

Well we'll float on good news is on the way...

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Also, be careful if you're planning on doing an endoscopy without insurance coverage. It will still go on your medical record. So, if you ever need to get new insurance, it will still be there on your record if they decide to dig deeper.


~Angie~

Gluten free since May 2004

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