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      Frequently Asked Questions About Celiac Disease   04/07/2018

      This Celiac.com FAQ on celiac disease will guide you to all of the basic information you will need to know about the disease, its diagnosis, testing methods, a gluten-free diet, etc.   Subscribe to Celiac.com's FREE weekly eNewsletter   What are the major symptoms of celiac disease? Celiac Disease Symptoms What testing is available for celiac disease?  Celiac Disease Screening Interpretation of Celiac Disease Blood Test Results Can I be tested even though I am eating gluten free? How long must gluten be taken for the serological tests to be meaningful? The Gluten-Free Diet 101 - A Beginner's Guide to Going Gluten-Free Is celiac inherited? Should my children be tested? Ten Facts About Celiac Disease Genetic Testing Is there a link between celiac and other autoimmune diseases? Celiac Disease Research: Associated Diseases and Disorders Is there a list of gluten foods to avoid? Unsafe Gluten-Free Food List (Unsafe Ingredients) Is there a list of gluten free foods? Safe Gluten-Free Food List (Safe Ingredients) Gluten-Free Alcoholic Beverages Distilled Spirits (Grain Alcohols) and Vinegar: Are they Gluten-Free? Where does gluten hide? Additional Things to Beware of to Maintain a 100% Gluten-Free Diet What if my doctor won't listen to me? An Open Letter to Skeptical Health Care Practitioners Gluten-Free recipes: Gluten-Free Recipes
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Aussie Peg

Australians And New Zealanders Hellooooooo :)

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I tried the purebred long rolls today. It was fine until about the third mouthful....it was so soft and tasty that I thought I must have grabbed someone elses lunch. I didn't they are just really tasty.

I also tried the Livwell naan bread which was perfect with my curry.

Will now stop going on about these brands- at least until they bring out something new.

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For anyone who might be travelling to the U.K- While Marks and Spencer don't really have online shopping they do have a list of food that does not contain gluten. It is very extensive and seems to include things like chesse that in most cases would be naturally gluten free. Something else to note- in their stores they don't really have a health food isle but rather have loads of gluten free marked food scattered around the store. It's not as complicated as some of the stores that do it here, as that is the setup for the whole store. So for example gluten-free pasta can be found in same part as normal, as can cakes. Also, at least when I was there a few years ago, they label things like crisps and mousses that mostly in here you would need to read the ingredients list for.

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I am so totally in love with the pure bred range. I have missed sausage sizzles so much but lately I have been having them on the roles (I split them in half and toast first) and they are SO GOOD. Plus I've been eating toast like there's no tomorrow. You don't want to know how much weight I have gained, OMG....

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I am so totally in love with the pure bred range. I have missed sausage sizzles so much but lately I have been having them on the roles (I split them in half and toast first) and they are SO GOOD. Plus I've been eating toast like there's no tomorrow. You don't want to know how much weight I have gained, OMG....

It's amazing. I love the crust on the bread rolls. I keep double checking the packet to make sure it says gluten free not guilt free or something simillar. I've even had non gluten-free people ask if "Are your sure, you can have that".

I've had the livwell rolls this week, which are also very tasty. They can sometimes be little crumbly and hollow but sitll taste great.

I'm off to England and Ireland in a few weeks- I'm gunna get loads of gluten-free jaffa cakes and have found a few places that do CRUMBED gluten free fish and chips. Also a bakery in Brixton that only sells gluten free stuff. My only problem is having enough time try everything

I think I'm going to come home a different shape to when I leave.

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Ooh, you lucky thing. Have a great trip! I loved the gluten free brownies that they sold in Sainsburys. I ate so many of them when I was there in 2010. Plus you can bring back stuff at much better prices than we pay here, customs don't mind packaged baked goods (I speak from experience, haha).

crumbed fish and chips would be amazing. Haven't had that in years. I miss potato scallops :-(

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Ooh, you lucky thing. Have a great trip! I loved the gluten free brownies that they sold in Sainsburys. I ate so many of them when I was there in 2010. Plus you can bring back stuff at much better prices than we pay here, customs don't mind packaged baked goods (I speak from experience, haha).

crumbed fish and chips would be amazing. Haven't had that in years. I miss potato scallops :-(

Yea. I sometimes buy the bayview fish but it's not the same as getting it hot from a shop. What Kind of things did you bring back? I've tried to find out what you can't bring back but the information is rubbish. I've had people bring back bisuits and bready things and all seemed ok.

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I meant to bring back the brownies but I uh, ate them all on the way. But I brought back english muffins (from the UK) and I regularly bring back Udi's bread / bagels, Chex cereal and snickerdoodles from the US. I've even brought back lara bars from the US once because they were so much cheaper there and I thought they might be an issue but it was fine (thank god as they were scattered all through my bag and I would've had to do some majory searching if they wanted them chucked out). I always declare them and customs ask a few questions (and I think they got quite a bit of amusement from my 'please let me keep my gluten free bagels!!' pleas) but they've always said it's fine.

Also a friend has posted me snickerdoodles and betty crocker brownie mix and while customs sometimes open the parcels, they've never confiscated them. So you should be fine with bread, cake type things etc. It's way more than I could say eat in transit but no where near like I'm planning on opening a shop with it. I'd imagine those kinds of large quantities would be an issue.

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At Nandos today I noticed packets of chips that are marked as gluten free. There was a mild one and hot one. Also something I discovered recently is that Red Rooster hot chips seem to be gluten-free by ingredient. They do battered stuff as well so there might be cc there.

I was looking at the Mcdonalds Uk site the other night and under the ingredients list for the fries it states that they are sometimes fried in the same fryer as the vegie pattie. They then helpfuly list the ingredients for that item right next to it. From what I remember it seemed ok. That's the first time I've ever seen something like that.

I got really annoyed earlier tonight- I wanted some tin souped (yes I know it's summer). Any way I picked up a few tins that were fine except for yeast from Barley. Why can't they just use gluten-free yeast? I know it might be slightly more expensive but surely the fact that more people could eat would even it out? I really don't like Lazuupa ones and they are about the only packet ones in the "normal" aisle labeled gluten-free.

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In woolies tonight I came across coco pop breakfast drinks. Next to the up and go etc. I read the ingredients and they seemed to be gluten-free. Just checked the website and it would seem to suggest the same. http://www.kelloggs.com.au/en_AU/product-search.pt-Beverages*.html.html#prevpoint contains link to product listing. be great if someone could take a look a confirm if I'm just blind and GLUTEN is clearly written somewhere. I find it interesting if not as coco pops (last I checked) have gluten. There also seems to be a nutrigrain one that would be ok.

 

I'm betting they don't taste the best but I really struggle with breakfast, especially as for me it is usually deskfast. What does everyone do for breakfast on the go? Not really a fruit and youghurt person.

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It is a chocolate flavoured milk ..... Coco Pops® Chocolatey Liquid Breakfast contains milk, sugar, vegetable fibre (inulin), cocoa, flavours, stabilisers, vitamins & minerals  - no rice bubbles at all ... Inulin is similar to psyllium as it provides soluble dietary fibre. The product is gluten free with only milk listed as an allergen.
 

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I guess I just always assumed that there was gluten in the flavourings of those cereals as well as the actaul wheat etc. I tried the nutrigrain ones today. It doesn't taste like I remember the milk from nutrigrain tasting but it's been so so long since I had it. It wasn't bad. Something to add to breakfast anyway.

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Have been pleasantly surprised for the third time this after finding another "didn't think I would be able to eat that food" Apart from the milk drinks I found a weight watchers frozen meal and now some frozen potato products.

 

Also found purebred hot cross buns in Coles and one Woolies that was stocking Livwell ones. 

 

Kind of makes up for the fact that the few tinned soups that used to be ok now containing various gluteny things. WHY?

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Can anyone shed light on the meaning in the details of gluten free labelling here in Australia? Does "gluten" (with 0 or nil detected or something similar) in the nutrition label demonstrate with certainty that something has been tested? And what does it mean when something is labelled "gluten free" but does not list "gluten" in the nutritional analysis?

We have been in Australia for over a year now and are doing better than ever. We love how much easier gluten free eating is here (compared to the States). Sometimes I worry that Australians don't know how good they have it here. Why are Australian coeliacs pushing for relaxed standards? Or is that a generalisation perpetuated by the Coeliac Australia?

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Can anyone shed light on the meaning in the details of gluten free labelling here in Australia? Does "gluten" (with 0 or nil detected or something similar) in the nutrition label demonstrate with certainty that something has been tested? And what does it mean when something is labelled "gluten free" but does not list "gluten" in the nutritional analysis?

We have been in Australia for over a year now and are doing better than ever. We love how much easier gluten free eating is here (compared to the States). Sometimes I worry that Australians don't know how good they have it here. Why are Australian coeliacs pushing for relaxed standards? Or is that a generalisation perpetuated by the Coeliac Australia?

Technically In Aus if something is labeled as gluten free then that is what it means. Be slightly careful if it is a imported product though as on rare ocassions you will find something labeled gluten-free but has the warning about been processed on other lines.

 

The standards we had a few years ago were already fairly strict but then they got even stricter.  I think it had more affect on products that aren't lableled as gluten free but are if you read the ingredients list. I think perhaps it was to help people who were extremely sensitive but it ended up making it harder for those who aren't.

 

It does make me wonder sometimes how different countries can have different levels of "gluten" that are ok. For example in some countries, specially grown oats are considered gluten-free but not here.

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Are Panadol mini caps gluten free? Anyone had any experiences with them?

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Are Panadol mini caps gluten free? Anyone had any experiences with them?

 

According to their website they are gluten-free. Check medication boxes carefully, it is often written on them somewhere- just not anywhere obvious.

As with foods, it is best to always check each time that the product is still ok. Also when checking websites for ingredients ensure it is the site for whatever country you are buying the product from. Also if overseas read the ingredients before buying the product even if it seems to be exactly the same.

 

Don't mean to sound like I'm treating you like a idiot- I just noticed you are a new member and not sure if you are new to gluten-free as well.

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For anyone who was watching Good Chef Bad Chef this morning the Lasagne they made was not gluten-free as they put spelt flour in. It's a pre recorded show so there really shouldn't be any excuse. Just unacceptable.

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Hello from the deep south off New zealand southland Invercargill :) 

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A big hello to you, peter/southland.  Not many Kiwis around here any more, so another voice from the mainland (or should I say Te Wai Pounamu now ;) since South Island is apparently not "official") is a welcome addition.

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There doesn't seem to be many of us left here at all. :P

 

A big hello to you, peter/southland.  Not many Kiwis around here any more,

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I went to Aldi tonight and found a bunch of things from their Has No range. I bought chocolate cake mix, rice porridge and instant chicken flavoured noodles. Only tried the noodles so far. They are pretty good. They didn't all stick together like the fantastic ones do. Also they don't taste as salty to me.

 

They also had sweet and savoury biscuits and some cereal. Apparently they only realease the range for a limited time each year. Seems a bit of a shame, while most products seem to have similar available in other places a bit of brand variety would be nice.

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I think the has no range is permanent now!, seems to be. There is no Kiwi's left because they all moved to the big dry island.

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I think the has no range is permanent now!, seems to be. There is no Kiwi's left because they all moved to the big dry island.

 

Not all of us, just the ones looking for a bigger buck :D (of the dollar variety, in case that was misconstrued :P ).  Some of us are still here on the Shaky Isles, in fact even in the heart of Shakyland :rolleyes:

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I'm new here and thought I'd say hi!

I'm in a very confused state at the moment. My 2 year old son had the bloods done about a month ago and his gliadin iga was 5 (negative) but his ttg iga/igg was >300 (very positive!!). My GP was happy to diagnose coeliac on that but my paed wants the biopsy done. The gastro is trying to fit us in before the 9th may.

Did anyone get diagnosed without the biopsy? Did anyone have the biopsy and it not be coelaic but something else?

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Hello!

I am from Brisbane and newly diagnosed coeliac. I am in the process of coming to terms with how much this is going to change my life and trying to find out as much I can about the disease.

I hope to use this forum for info and guideance as I have found a lack of Australian coeliac forums.

Looking forward to talking to you all. Apologies if I ask stupid questions for a bit.

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  • Who's Online   6 Members, 1 Anonymous, 872 Guests (See full list)

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