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Aussie Peg

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Might have glutened myself. I bought some of the Jamie Oliver branded beef burgers from Woolworths. I checked the allergen statement when I bought them and it says soy and sulphates. After eating I realise breadcrumbs is listed as an ingredient, however in brackets next to that it only says contains soy. Nowhere else in the ingredients list does it list wheat/rye/barely/oats and I have checked the allergen statement again and the rest of the packaging and can't see any type of gluten or may contain gluten statement.

What I want to know is that if the breadcrumbs are from wheat/gluten then at least legally, they should be declaring this either in brackets next to it or they should list wheat/gluten in the allergen statement?

I'm interested in knowing this too, so have sent a product enquiry to Woolworths.

Legally they are meant to declare any of the top allergens in the ingredients panel, which includes those containing gluten. Mistakes do happen, though. Woolworths has had a number in the past week: a stack of their Macro brand nut spreads were recalled due to a failure to declare potential traces of peanuts and tree nuts, and some beef mince was recalled as it contained food grade blue plastic!

I'll let you know how they respond.

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PS: What is the deal with alcoholic cider? Are they all gluten free or not? I'm reading conflicting things on the Internet... seems like barley etc. is sometimes added in the brewing process?

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I heard back from Woolies. The burgers are indeed gluten free.

"Thank you for contacting Woolworths with regards to the ingredients of the Jamie Oliver Beef Burgers Mexican Style.

I can advise you that this product does not contain gluten products and does not cross contact with any other ingredient that contains gluten."

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Thanks Sammykins! 

This makes happy as I found them really tasty. I've tried  and looked at a few other products in the range and noticed they seem to use rice flour  or non wheat/gluten based sauces in alot them (some have wheat, but they are clear). I wish more companies would do this, gives me more options and I'm sure no one will notice a gluten free taste.  I'm going to visit family this weekend and one night we are going to have a roast- they were shocked when I said to them they will need to buy a plain roast as most of the others have wheat in. They had assumed the prepared one would just have some herbs on them . 

Whenever I have bought something with breadcrumbs it is either labeled gluten-free on the front or they note in brackets they have used gluten-free ones, so I just wasn't sure with burgers.

 

I'm not sure about the cider as I thought all were ok. Tried to google, the sites I saw that had lists of gluten-free ciders or suggested some aren't seemed to be mostly from the US... So I wonder if it is something different in the brewing process there? I really don't know but I just thought it was interesting. 

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Me again. 

Just thought I'd let everyone know that Coles has expanded their own brand range. They now include wraps- someone bought these for me, I was a bit worried as they have that plastic look, but I found them really soft and tasty if heated slightly. They also didn't fall to bits, although I didn't stuff them. 

I also found rice noodle cups in beef and Mi goreng flavour. I've only tried the Mi goreng ones,  they are bit spicy, the flavouring tastes like the one from the noodles you buy in the Asian section with the red and yellow packaging. The noodles that Coles use are thick brown rice ones. Much nicer that the glass ones in the Fantastic version and they don't clump as much. 

The third thing I found is the most exciting for me. A box of individual packets of flavoured rice porridge! The flavours are vanilla, blueberry, honey. I haven't tried them yet. 

 

As much as I feel a bit sorry for some of the gluten-free companies that Coles has stopped stocking since bringing out there own range, I have to say that it is fast becoming one of my favourites. I really like the way they have some different things like Banana bread and quinoa cups. Even of the things they have that other companies do like sweet biscuits, I sometimes find I prefer Coles brand. All personal taste of course but makes me a happy little English Marmite. 

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Just warning you all that Cheezels are not longer gluten free by ingredient.    My daughter has eaten them for years with no problem as they were gluten free by ingredient.   They did have a may contain statement but we often buy products with a may contain and have had no negative reactions whatsoever.   Today I just happened to look at the ingredient listing on the Cheezels box which I haven't done for a long time and noticed it contains barley!   This is just wrong as there would be many people who don't check the ingredients each time they buy the product. Why would they change the formulation and add another allergy causing ingredient?  I am going to complain of course.  The lesson to be learnt here is to regularly check ingredients on products that were previously gluten free.

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I never realised that they were gluten-free by ingredient, I have avoided them for years thinking they have gluten in them. Obviously that is irrelevant now. I think that if a product has been free of an allergen and a company changes the recipe, I think they should have to put at least a new recipe sign on the front of the packet, regardless of it was advertised as free from or not.  I think I posted a while ago about weight watchers adding wheat to one of their frozen meals and me nearly eating it.

 

 If it is helpful Woolworths used to do a gluten-free cheese tubes, which were like cheezels, I haven't bought them in awhile but I'm failry sure they still do them. Also both Coles and Woolies under their own gluten-free brand have versions of Twisties in chicken and cheese flavour. 

 

I saw an ad for Natural chip company chips today that says they are gluten free- I think this might be new as I think I have checked packaging before only to find they contained gluten. 

 

On another note had a frustrating experience with someone recently who suggested we get a bbq chicken for dinner. I politely explained that I can not eat that due to the seasoning/basting. Their reply was "oh it will be fine, we can take the seasoning/basting off for you" Me: Unfortunately all the flavouring goes through, so it doesn't work like that. Them: But surely if you take off the seasoning it is ok? There won't be much gluten left? Me: No . What I really wanted to say was No it is not OK. If it was ok I would have said so, because I would actually really like to have a store bought bbq chicken.

 

I tried the coles Blueberry rice porridge this morning- I love it. Tomorrow I will try the honey one. I usually hate breakfast and have to force something down but between the porridge, gluten-free weetbix and Genius Pan Aui Chocolates I just might look forward to it, at least on the weekend. 

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I'd really like to have a store-bought BBQ chicken too. My mother keeps trying to push me to eat it and ugh.

--

I spent the past week in Melbourne and thought I'd report back with some of restaurants we successfully ate at.

We went on the Colonial Tram Restaurant for lunch one day, OMG best gluten free bread EVER which reminds me I need to email them to find out what brand it was. They also came out with an individual gluten free cheese platter for dessert. Husband was very pleased since he still got a full sized (shared between 2) platter and there was no way I could eat all of my cheese, HIM on the other hand ... !!! http://www.tramrestaurant.com.au

In the Yarra Valley we ate at Meletos http://stonesoftheyarravalley.com/meletos/and we also went to the Mornington Penninsula where we dined at Paringa Estate http://www.paringaestate.com.au/Winery/Restaurant/Restaurant

In Melbourne city we ate at:

Cookie - Thai place. Most of the medium-sized menu items can be made gluten free (their soy sauce contains gluten as does some other things like their chilli jam). We shared an egg net chicken salad and chicken and prawn pad Thai. NB their children's book themed decor is a little creepy. Don't say I didn't warn you. http://cookie.net.au

Operator 25 - breakfast/lunch. They are near the Raddison on Flagstaff and the Queen Victoria Markets. Like a lot of places, they offer gluten free bread but put it through the regular toaster (whyyyyyyyyy). However, when asked they were champs and put it under the grill on a separate pan, and we saw that the docket stated 'severe allergy' so the kitchen staff were made aware, top job!! Food and coffee both very good. Their bacon is amazing (confirmed gluten free). Hubby was also pleased with his meals (we ate there more than once, when you find something good you stick with it!). http://www.operator25.com.au

Meatball and Wine Bar - got the spiel about having a shared kitchen, but did not get sick. They wrote down gluten free on the meal docket and presented my meal to me with a 'here's your gluten free xxx' which I've always found to be a good sign. http://www.meatballandwinebar.com.au

Bomba Tapas Bar and Rooftop Terrace - menu not marked but knowledgeable staff. I loved that they brought out a little dish of smoked almonds for me in place of the complimentary bread. That was a really thoughtful touch. http://bombabar.com.au

Mamasita's - everything on the menu is gluten free except the dishes with flour tortillas which are marked with asterixes! http://mamasita.com.au/

Want to come back for - gluten free fish and chips at Hooked! They even have gluten free beer for beer-battered fish and a dedicated fryer! They are at three locations too! I really wanted to eat there but was too full from lunch, my husband's regular fish and chips looked AMAZING. http://www.hooked.net.au

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Does anyone know if there are any brands/varieties of ice cream other than Bulla available from supermarkets that are gluten free?

Stacks of them declare the presence of wheat where the only form of wheat in the ingredients list is wheat glucose syrup... I'm guessing there's no way of knowing whether it may be cross-contaminated without contacting the manufacturer?

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Some of Weis ones used to be and were labeled so- I haven't looked for ages so not sure if they still are. Blue Ribbon used to have some that were ok- not lableled gluten-free but were ok by ingredient-but this was about seven years ago. I'm not sure if it's just me, but unlike most things I find it harder to buy icecream than a few years ago. Coles do a very strange thing with their own brand and in the contains section it will state: Contains Wheat Glucose syrup (gluten) I recently found some of their own version magnum things that were ok, I THINK it was the maple ones. I think some magnums are ok- again not labeled gluten-free but they are ok by ingredient and have no shared equipment statement. 

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PS: What is the deal with alcoholic cider? Are they all gluten free or not? I'm reading conflicting things on the Internet... seems like barley etc. is sometimes added in the brewing process?

I've never come across a cider with gluten in it. Alcoholic ginger beer however is a different story, I haven't found a gluten free one yet! 

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I think that some of the Crabbies ones are and are labeled so. Haven't had them for a awhile though so it may not be gluten-free anymore. There is also a brand who's name I can't think of but it has a dragon on the label. Just check the packaging though as I think only certain ones are. It's also really expensive- around $9 for 500ml bottle. 

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Is anyone else getting annoyed with family trying to arrange foods for Christmas? I offered to get snacks for the day including chips. Which was meet with a reply of well just organise food for yourself so you have something. Grr

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Made a massive twat of myself tonight. Went out for dinner and ordered a pasta dish. Normally it comes as linguine but they can make a gluten-free version using gluten-free penne. So my dish comes out and after taking a few bites, I notice what looks like bits of linguine in it. I pick out and when the waiter comes to check if everything is ok, I ask about the stringy bits. They assured me it was most definitely onion. It was. They were very nice about it and didn't answer in a huffy was like sometimes happens but I still felt Like a tit for thinking it was gluten pasta.

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Some of those look good. I found some of their pancake mix the other day. Not tried it yet. Have tried a few bits from Has no range. Liked them all, but trouble is apart from a few packs of biscuits, pasta and bread they don't stock the other stuff most of the time. Will definetly pop in this week though. 

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Regarding alcoholic ginger beer, Matso's and Crabbies are labelled gluten free.

Has anyone tried/done a FIFO assignment?

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Has anyone tried/done a FIFO assignment?

I haven't, what is it? Google brings back hits for Fly In Fly Out mining jobs?!

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Yes, FIFO is Fly In Fly Out. In essence one mobilises to a work camp, prevalent in mining and oil & gas projects. Camps have kitchens with food service. Gluten free options exist, but cross contamination seems concerning. Even if only going to site for a short stint, access to grocery stores and personal food prep is severely limited. I haven't yet met any celiacs that have tried it and can't quite determine if the accommodation required is "reasonable". My gut says it could be done, but some preparation by all involved would be necessary. Hoping to hear of first hand experiences!

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Anyone get things from Aldi?

I ended up getting a few. So far tried the cheese tubes and tom yum noodles. The tubes taste similar to the other gluten-free ones you get. The noodles are nice flavour, the texture is a bit odd but I think that it is more just my personal preference. 

 

I also bought some black forest biscuits, Mocha cake mix, Banana cake mix, two bread mixes, lava cake mix and some milk poppers. Ended spending about $28 all up. Wanted to get some Gazpacho as well but they didn't have any.

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Anyone get things from Aldi?

I ended up getting a few. So far tried the cheese tubes and tom yum noodles. The tubes taste similar to the other gluten-free ones you get. The noodles are nice flavour, the texture is a bit odd but I think that it is more just my personal preference.

I also bought some black forest biscuits, Mocha cake mix, Banana cake mix, two bread mixes, lava cake mix and some milk poppers. Ended spending about $28 all up. Wanted to get some Gazpacho as well but they didn't have any.

Wowsa, that's a lot of product for $28! I haven't been since I'm not all that keen for a lot of the stuff they were advertising, but mocha cake mix sounds amazing! I might go check it out just for that, though I imagine there probably isn't much left by now. Thanks for reporting back!

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Anyone had a gluten-free meal on Singapore Airlines? Flying with them soon. Heard fairly good things about their regular meals, although I'm still expecting rice cakes instead of any kind of gluten-free bread and fruit salad for dessert. Also no yoghurt with breakfast..... even though the food for the breakfast flight will have been prepared in Aus and I can usually eat the brand of yoghurt served to everyone else!

 

End of the day though, as long as they remember to load a gluten-free meal for me I will be happy. Always take some snacks but it's a bit hard to pack anything decent with a 26 hour travel time and all the restrictions.

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Friends, today is a sad day. For some of us, anyway. See I am one of those rare creatures who was able to consume Freedom Foods Free Oats, which test under 3ppm for gluten as found in wheat, rye, barley and triticale. In other words, I can have "oat gluten" (avenin) so long as it's not cross-contaminated with the other forms of gluten.

I noticed that the packs had changed recently and there was no longer the blurb about production/testing methods. So I contacted them and got this reply:

"As our business has grown, so has the need to reappraise our supply chain requirements.

We need to ensure enough volume to maintain consistency of supply and a 'wheat free' oat is no longer a feasible option for us.

Our Oats are now available in the new packaging labelled Porridge.

This product is no longer "wheat free"."

Party poopers.

Time to go raid the supermarkets for any remaining boxes.

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I find that a bit poor. My understanding is that the company only produce allergen free products, so I don' t think it good that they have made a product that now includes one it previously did not. It annoys me when a "regular" companies make a product I can have and then change their ingredients to include something with gluten, but I can understand it a bit more that a specific allergen free one doing it. 

 

On the subject of oats- I'm off to the Uk at the end of week, where you can buy gluten free oats/oat porridge which I really really want to try. My dilemma is this: I used to cheat a lot and eat things with gluten, I was never really sensitive  and could eat a reasonable  bit before I would get sick. I have been good for about nine years. I have on occasion eaten gluten by accident and not gotten sick, but don't know if that means I would be ok with gluten-free oats or not.  From what I have read, it seems that maybe it is only very sensitive coeliacs who can't tolerate oats. 

 

I remember having oat porridge with honey as a Kid and really liking it. I buy the rice porridge now and although I do like it, it is just not the same as oats one.  

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