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Simplifying My Diet

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I've been gluten-free and (mostly) df for 7 months but my stomach is still really bad. I want to simpilfy my diet in an attempt to a) give my stomach a rest and B) work out other intolerances. I wonder eg if I've got a problem with soy as there's so much of it in gluten-free stuff. I'm thinking of limiting food to: meat and fish (unprocessed), veggies, fruit, rice and potatoes. my problem is finding enough stuff (especially snacks) to fill me up (I know I can't eat beans and I have to seriously limit nut intake). Also, what would I eat for breakfast.

So, any examples of what others eat, especially for snacks or breakfast, would be welcome.

Thanks! :D

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As far as snacks are convcerned, my wife has found that ricecakes and crispbreads with jam or cheese make for quite good snacks, and work quite well for breakfast too.

If not, make up some mashed potato, mix into it any kind of spice mix you like [discovery foods do a fantastic cajun spice mix thats gluten free!], mash in some grated cheese and put it in the fride overnight. Its lovely hot or cold. The only problem she has is keeping me away from it!

We're still fairly new to the diet, so other people may well have better ideas.

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You didn't mention eggs, are they out?

The important thing will be for you to eat enough fat. Fat should comprise at least 30% of your diet. Meat should not be very lean nor perfectly trimmed. It may take building up to this, but not eating enough fat will cause you difficulty in sticking to your diet and problems in the long run.

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I've been gluten-free and (mostly) df for 7 months but my stomach is still really bad. I want to simpilfy my diet in an attempt to a) give my stomach a rest and B) work out other intolerances. I wonder eg if I've got a problem with soy as there's so much of it in gluten-free stuff. I'm thinking of limiting food to: meat and fish (unprocessed), veggies, fruit, rice and potatoes. my problem is finding enough stuff (especially snacks) to fill me up (I know I can't eat beans and I have to seriously limit nut intake). Also, what would I eat for breakfast.

So, any examples of what others eat, especially for snacks or breakfast, would be welcome.

Thanks! :D

Can I recommend a book?

The Kensington diet, author Steven Twigg.....

Its a Hay's diet/food combining book but also adds cycling of "bad foods" and I find this does help me from time to time.... he also has a bunch of recipes largely gluten-free but also missing out other food groups....

There is a sequel (isn't there always) which is recipees only. so you could get 1st from a public library and if you like it buy the 2nd one.

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Guest nini

I would recommend nothing but fresh fruit in the morning (until noon) eat as much of it as you like. If you get hungry, eat more fruit. Bananas are more filling and a good source of potassium, Canaloupe is also filling. You can make smoothies with fruit juice as well for variety. Fruit salads are fun and easy too. This will help your digestive system to function more the way it is supposed to.

For lunch I like to eat vegetarian sushi rolls: sushi rice, nori, avocados, cucumbers, carrots or whatever other veggie you like. These are actually really easy to make and I find them quite filling. You can make them with brown rice if you prefer. (If you want the recipe let me know and I can e-mail it to you) For variety I'll also do salad with either cut up cooked chicken or tuna fish. You could do broiled salmon very easily and that's really yummy on a salad.

For snacks I keep it really simple and stick to raw pistachio nuts, or Enjoy Life Cereal Bars (free of most common allergens)

Dinners are usually a veggie dish, potatoes or rice, baked chicken or pork, or a stir fry dish. Once a week I do tacos with ground beef.

I also make up a crock pot full of black eyed peas with green beans and freeze it in small freezer bag portions and can heat that up and have it over steamed rice.

I usually just drink water. One cup of coffee in the morning but that's it. Water the rest of the time. Whenever I stray from this routine and try to do something more complex I usually end up getting sick. I try to avoid processed foods as much as possible. I've also recently discovered Pamela's Amazing Wheat Free/Gluten Free Bread and it is absolutely wonderful. I'll eat it fresh from the breadmaker or warmed in the microwave with a little real butter on it. I don't use margarine at all.

I do like cheese and I stick to block cheeses. I shred it over salads or corn chips or eat it by itself.

Hope this gives you some ideas.

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I do nuts and dried fruit a lot for snacks. I've also been eating beef jerky and salami for more protein. I've been exploring the gluten-free bar options for times when I'm on the run -- most of them are, essentially, nuts and dried fruits, but sometimes I haven't had the time to put together a bag of snacks for myself, so I keep a couple bars in my backpack.

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A perhaps revolutionary idea: don't eat snacks at all. :blink: I've stopped eating snacks, instead I eat 3 or sometimes 4 times a day and give my stomach time to completely digest and empty itself of the foods that I've eaten before putting anything new in there. Works well for me.

It only works when I take care to eat enough fats and protein in my meals though. Otherwise I get hungry too soon and end up snacking again.

Pauliina

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I've only been on the diet for a little over a month, but I hope that I can maybe help with some suggestions.

For breakfast I have found some gluten-free corn cakes that are super thin and light. I spread strawberry jam on them and eat them like I used to eat toast. Then I take a container of yogurt and a piece of fruit with me to work to eat during the morning as I get hungry (I'm not a big breakfast eater).

For snacks I stick mainly to fresh fruit and veggies. It helps that I really enjoy fruits and veggies anyways. Also, when I need something salty I will eat a handful of peanuts or make some popcorn.

Good luck!

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I like the approach outlined in Food Allergies and Food Intolerances by Jonathan Brostoff, MD. He recommends doing your detective work in stages, to avoid being over-strict with your diet unless you really need to do that.

The first stage is what he calls a healthy-eating diet, which eliminates the common foods and beverages that can have drug-like effects on the body: caffeine, alchohol, chocolate, sugar, and histamine-rich foods (like well-ripened cheeses and salami-like sausages, some types of fish). He says that if you have a leaky gut, these things can have a greater effect on you than they might otherwise. That alone might give you a big improvement. If not, you can go on to the more strict elimination diets.

If you do an elimination diet, I'd suggest getting some thorough guidelines first, so you don't waste your time. (Brostoff's is good, and Joneja has written some excellent stuff, too.) I did one earlier this summer (and need to revisit it), and even though it was tough, it was the best thing I've ever done for myself. I had no idea how good a "clean slate" could feel!

Gotta go. Good luck!

Carol

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If you're going to try to simplify your diet, don't think about "what should I eat for breakfast?", but rather decide what you're eating and work around that. Breakfast is defined only by the time of day you eat it, not what you eat. :) Breakfasts can include anything lunch can include which can include anything that dinner can include. :D

Fruits and vegetables, meats, eggs, and safe grains can make anything. The key, in this sort of thing, is to make enough food that you have leftovers when you want snacks. Have a few hardboiled eggs on hand. Have extra stir-fry around. Cook extra chicken to use in a myriad of ways. Use fruits for smoothies, on salads, as a snack on its own, with grains, etc. Essentially, make your own snacks. :)

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Well, I'm kind of the opposite of Nini. I would recommend meat or eggs at all meals then the desire to snack will completely leave. At least, that is how it works for my body.

I'm eating paleo-ish which means basically fruit, veggies, meats, fish and limited nuts/seeds. My one exception is I nibble on very high quality, dairy free dark, dark chocolate. I have about 1 square a day.

For snacks I have fruit (grapes, nectarines, peaches, whatever is in season). I avoid starchy fruits like bananas, they play havoc with my blood sugar. Sometimes I have dried fruit (raisins or figs).

Nuts are great, but if you're giving your tum a holiday you might not want to do that. I think macadamia nuts are the easiest to digest for me.

I also make curries. The ingredients are pretty wholesome (peppers, garlic, spices) and I mix the curry paste with coconut milk and add in chicken, water chestnuts and some other veggies. Often times I have left over meat or curry in the morning for breakfast. I avoid rice, but have it occassionally. I notice things go down hill if I eat it too often.

When I want a special treat, I make a sugarless lemon custard from eggs and use splenda for sweetening.

I also eat lots of salads and put chicken and/or avocado on top along with whatever else sounds good (like pecan pieces). Occassionally I'll bake something from ingredients like flax seed meal, almond meal, coconut flour and eggs. Pancakes made from these are very good topped with frozen (thawed) berries.

Other times I get a big, lovely pork roast, put a dry rub on it and cook it slow and low for hours. Cut it up and freeze part of it.

But really, since I have been concentrating on eating lots of lovely protein I don't have the blood sugar ups and downs that make me want to munch all day long.

I keep a can of tuna and some peanuts in my desk drawer at work in case I get hungry, but I don't very often.

Oh yeah, I had a bedtime snack of raisins mixed with raw sunflower seeds and a little peanut butter last night. Sounds weird doesn't it? It was GOOOD!

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Well, I'm kind of the opposite of Nini. I would recommend meat or eggs at all meals then the desire to snack will completely leave. At least, that is how it works for my body.

I'm eating paleo-ish which means basically fruit, veggies, meats, fish and limited nuts/seeds. My one exception is I nibble on very high quality, dairy free dark, dark chocolate. I have about 1 square a day.

For snacks I have fruit (grapes, nectarines, peaches, whatever is in season). I avoid starchy fruits like bananas, they play havoc with my blood sugar. Sometimes I have dried fruit (raisins or figs).

Nuts are great, but if you're giving your tum a holiday you might not want to do that. I think macadamia nuts are the easiest to digest for me.

I also make curries. The ingredients are pretty wholesome (peppers, garlic, spices) and I mix the curry paste with coconut milk and add in chicken, water chestnuts and some other veggies. Often times I have left over meat or curry in the morning for breakfast. I avoid rice, but have it occassionally. I notice things go down hill if I eat it too often.

When I want a special treat, I make a sugarless lemon custard from eggs and use splenda for sweetening.

I also eat lots of salads and put chicken and/or avocado on top along with whatever else sounds good (like pecan pieces). Occassionally I'll bake something from ingredients like flax seed meal, almond meal, coconut flour and eggs. Pancakes made from these are very good topped with frozen (thawed) berries.

Other times I get a big, lovely pork roast, put a dry rub on it and cook it slow and low for hours. Cut it up and freeze part of it.

But really, since I have been concentrating on eating lots of lovely protein I don't have the blood sugar ups and downs that make me want to munch all day long.

I keep a can of tuna and some peanuts in my desk drawer at work in case I get hungry, but I don't very often.

Oh yeah, I had a bedtime snack of raisins mixed with raw sunflower seeds and a little peanut butter last night. Sounds weird doesn't it? It was GOOOD!

You should use your left over curry to make stuffed courgettes - they´re delicious, filling and don´t make you feel bloated like potatoes which I have a real problem with.

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Well, I'm kind of the opposite of Nini. I would recommend meat or eggs at all meals then the desire to snack will completely leave. At least, that is how it works for my body.

I'm eating paleo-ish which means basically fruit, veggies, meats, fish and limited nuts/seeds. My one exception is I nibble on very high quality, dairy free dark, dark chocolate. I have about 1 square a day.

For snacks I have fruit (grapes, nectarines, peaches, whatever is in season). I avoid starchy fruits like bananas, they play havoc with my blood sugar. Sometimes I have dried fruit (raisins or figs).

Nuts are great, but if you're giving your tum a holiday you might not want to do that. I think macadamia nuts are the easiest to digest for me.

I also make curries. The ingredients are pretty wholesome (peppers, garlic, spices) and I mix the curry paste with coconut milk and add in chicken, water chestnuts and some other veggies. Often times I have left over meat or curry in the morning for breakfast. I avoid rice, but have it occassionally. I notice things go down hill if I eat it too often.

When I want a special treat, I make a sugarless lemon custard from eggs and use splenda for sweetening.

I also eat lots of salads and put chicken and/or avocado on top along with whatever else sounds good (like pecan pieces). Occassionally I'll bake something from ingredients like flax seed meal, almond meal, coconut flour and eggs. Pancakes made from these are very good topped with frozen (thawed) berries.

Other times I get a big, lovely pork roast, put a dry rub on it and cook it slow and low for hours. Cut it up and freeze part of it.

But really, since I have been concentrating on eating lots of lovely protein I don't have the blood sugar ups and downs that make me want to munch all day long.

I keep a can of tuna and some peanuts in my desk drawer at work in case I get hungry, but I don't very often.

Oh yeah, I had a bedtime snack of raisins mixed with raw sunflower seeds and a little peanut butter last night. Sounds weird doesn't it? It was GOOOD!

You're making me hungry! Momma Goose had a good recipe she gave lister I am going to try-old fashioned eggs, sausage and potatoes- been thinking of that one all week!!!! Have my son coming in this week so I have got to get organized on some hearty meals. :D

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I've been gluten-free and (mostly) df for 7 months but my stomach is still really bad. I want to simpilfy my diet in an attempt to a) give my stomach a rest and B) work out other intolerances. I wonder eg if I've got a problem with soy as there's so much of it in gluten-free stuff. I'm thinking of limiting food to: meat and fish (unprocessed), veggies, fruit, rice and potatoes. my problem is finding enough stuff (especially snacks) to fill me up (I know I can't eat beans and I have to seriously limit nut intake). Also, what would I eat for breakfast.

So, any examples of what others eat, especially for snacks or breakfast, would be welcome.

Thanks! :D

im doing the same thing at the mo and have a nut problem, not a major one where i stop breathing or anything but enough to be a problem for me. im eating a lot of eggs at the mo and haveing salmon and peas in my ommlette coverd in tomatoes, :P LOVE IT. i also do alot of frozen veg and fish and stir frys.

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A really good breakfast is sauteed vegetables with poached or scrambled eggs. With poached I've done: summer squash, asparagus, swiss chard, beet greens; with scrambled I've done nappa cabbage, brocoli, etc. I always use leek or onion or shallot. It is actually quite good. I do worry about eating eggs EVERY day and not taking a break, so I try to go one day a week w/o the eggs. Then I eat some grainless cereal I found at my co-op mixed with applesauce.

I like the fruit idea, but then you're lacking protein, and you might want to snack. When I did the fruit only til noon thing several years ago I was so ultra regular, though - I mean the exact same second on the clock every day I was in the washroom doing my business. That was kindof nice. But it is a lot of sugar first thing in the morning.

Snacks - I use nuts which you say bother you a bit. Some good veggies cold: summer squash (not cooked), asparagus (sauteed the night before), chopped up peppers (though these are nightshades, so only if you tolerate them well [i don't]).

I would definitely elminate all soy and dairy and beans and, if you are willing, grains, to see if that helps you. Nightshades are also a tricky one. Nuts can be tough (I love them!). Corn is a big allergen too.

Good luck.

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Thanks for all the great ideas :) I've tried having meat with my brekkie the past couple of mornings and that's really helped. I really can't stand eggs, so unfortunately omelettes etc are out. Got to check out that book that Carol suggested - doing detective work in stages sounds good to me! I think part of the trick with this is getting organised, so there's plenty of left overs around. I guess I'd better get cooking!

Changing the subject .... my 3 year old DS was so sweet yesterday when my GERD was playing up so much I was in tears. He got his toy golf clubs, poked them at my stomach (very gently) and said he was a 'make you better doctor' and that my tummy would be all better now :D I wish it was that simple! B)

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I've been having the same prob w/breakfast.... I love cereal but have only found 1 that is gluten-free (also seems to be taste free). My husband told me about a back-packing breakfast that he uses when out camping... it's just cooked rice (cold), milk, sugar, cinnamon, and raisins. You could put anything you want in it. I still haven't tried it... maybe tomorow.

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