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Jestgar

When To Introduce Gluten?

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Someone asked about this a while back and I just saw this article so I thought I'd post it.

Results Fifty-one children developed CDA. Findings adjusted for HLA-DR3 status indicated that children exposed to foods containing wheat, barley, or rye (gluten-containing foods) in the first 3 months of life (3 [6%] CDA positive vs 40 [3%] CDA negative) had a 5-fold increased risk of CDA compared with children exposed to gluten-containing foods at 4 to 6 months (12 [23%] CDA positive vs 574 [38%] CDA negative) (hazard ratio


, 5.17; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.44-18.57). Children not exposed to gluten until the seventh month or later (36 [71%] CDA positive vs 895 [59%] CDA negative) had a marginally increased risk of CDA compared with those exposed at 4 to 6 months (HR, 1.87; 95% CI, 0.97-3.60). After restricting our case group to only the 25 CDA-positive children who had biopsy-diagnosed celiac disease, initial exposure to wheat, barley, or rye in the first 3 months (3 [12%] CDA positive vs 40 [3%] CDA negative) or in the seventh month or later (19 [76%] CDA positive vs 912 [59%] CDA negative) significantly increased risk of CDA compared with exposure at 4 to 6 months (3 [12%] CDA positive vs 583 [38%] CDA negative) (HR, 22.97; 95% CI, 4.55-115.93; P = .001; and HR, 3.98; 95% CI, 1.18-13.46; P = .04, respectively).

Translation: This group found that introducing gluten between 4-6 months had the least likelyhood of developing celiac disease autoimmunity (CDA).

I think there was a different study done in Sweden. I'll see if I can find it.

This study was a little different.

OBJECTIVE: A national change in infant feeding recommendations was proposed in 1996 in Sweden: a slow introduction to gluten during weaning was stressed, the recommendation being introduction at 4 instead of 6 months of age. The aim of the present study was to compare the prevalence of celiac disease in healthy young children born before and after the new feeding recommendations in 1996. CONCLUSIONS: The prevalence of symptomatic celiac disease declined after the infant dietary recommendations were introduced in 1996, but we could not find any difference in undiagnosed celiac disease between the screened children born before and those born after 1996.

So fewer symptoms, but just as much celiac, hmm


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Our GI told us not to give Maddie gluten until she was a year. She just turned a year last month and I still haven't given her any. We are trying to figure out the milk issue first then we will move on to wheat.

It makes me nervous to give her wheat. I have a mind-set that it is poison it's hard for me to even think about my baby eating wheat. But right now there isn't a reason not to let her have it.

I sure hope we did the right thing waiting so long and that isn't going to increase her chances....of course it is genetics right? :rolleyes:


gluten-free since 2004!

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I sure hope we did the right thing waiting so long and that isn't going to increase her chances....

Since nobody really knows, my guess would be that you did absolutely the right thing. You have given her time to become healthy and strong and nobody "needs" gluten.

If I had a child I would never feed her brussel sprouts because I think they're yucky. Not for a second would I worry about her missing out on some vital brussel sprout-induced experience.

Also that second study suggests that the kids still got Celiac at the same rate, it just wasn't clinically detectable. So maybe waiting until your child is old enough to verbally tell you that her tummy hurts when she eats that will help you know if it's a problem or not.


"But then, in all honesty, if scientists don't play god, who will?"

- James Watson

My sources are unreliable, but their information is fascinating.

- Ashleigh Brilliant

Leap, and the net will appear.

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Most of the studies I've read have suggested the same thing--a sweet spot to introduce gluten at 4 to 6mos...earlier or longer, appears to, at this point, only increase the chances of reaction.


~~~~~~~

Jen

Indianapolis, IN

gluten-free since Feb 2005

dairy-free

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Hmm...personally, I don't think I'll be feeding my kids gluten until they're old enough not to be gummy with wheat. Ever try cleaning up a toddler that's been eating cheerios :o ? The stuff gets E V E R Y W H E R E!!! I don't want a hazmat suit to be able to hold my kid, ya know?

Nobody needs gluten :P


Alright, don't worry even if things end up a bit too heavy

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Hmm...personally, I don't think I'll be feeding my kids gluten until they're old enough not to be gummy with wheat. Ever try cleaning up a toddler that's been eating cheerios :o ? The stuff gets E V E R Y W H E R E!!! I don't want a hazmat suit to be able to hold my kid, ya know?

Nobody needs gluten :P

Wow, good point! I wouldn't have thought of that, but I will next time I'm handed someone's baby to play with.

Thanks for saving me from getting glutened!


"But then, in all honesty, if scientists don't play god, who will?"

- James Watson

My sources are unreliable, but their information is fascinating.

- Ashleigh Brilliant

Leap, and the net will appear.

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