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Mayflowers

Sourdough Wheat Bread?

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Hi I just read this on Dr. Mc Dougall's website in his 2005 newsletter on celiac.

*Lactobacilli bacteria are used to make sourdough bread, which will remove (hydrolyze) most of the gluten and make the wheat tolerable for most people with celiac disease.2

This info he provided was taken from a medical journal. What do you think about that? Safe Wheat? :blink:


HLA-DQ 3,1 (Subtype 8,6)

Antigliadin IgA 72

Antitissue Transglutaminase IgA 49

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Sounds extremely fishy to me. What medical journal did that study?

Possibly this may be along the lines of spelt-- better for those with just a mild intolerance, but not safe for Celiacs.

Besides, don't lactobacilli act on lactose, not gluten? Scientists, what exactly does "hydrolyzed" mean? I thought hydrolyzed wheat protein was a no-no for us anyway-- am I wrong?


The Queen of Hearts,

She made some tarts

All on a summer's day.

The Knave of Hearts,

He stole the tarts

And took them clean away.

Diagnosed at age 49 by biopsy 31 May 2006

Learning how to bake those tarts gluten-free!

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i notice it says "most" and not "all" gluten, so how could it be safe?


Christine

15 year old twins with celiac, diagnosed dec. 2005

11 year old daughter with celiac diagnosed dec 2005

17 year old son with celiac gene

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I've heard this before too. I think it's one of those things that works in a lab but not in most practical situations.

Either way, it doesn't work if you also have allergies to wheat.


Gluten free since Feb 2006, Dairy and Soy free since 2009

Anemic off and on since 2003

Negative tTG Ab, IgA, Gliadin Ab IgA, wheat allergy (IgE) blood tests (Feb 2006)

Positive wheat allergy skin test(Apr 2006)and dietary response (Feb 2006)

Celiac grandmother (Dx in 1940s, "grew out of it")

Training for my first triathlon to support the Crohn's and Colitis Foundation of America.

~Amy

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That's interesting. Not that I would ever eat "real" bread again, but sourdough used to be the only bread that I could stomach, even before my major symptoms set in.


~Angie~

Gluten free since May 2004

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When I was eating bread I would eat sour doughs because I couldn't tolerate yeasts. I would order bread from French Meadow bakery in Mn. They have a web. site Frenchmeadow.com. I copied what they had to say about sour dough. It is healhier.

Without the use of baker's yeast, dough may take eight or ten times as long to rise, but you might agree with us that the wait is worth it. Why, then, do we leave the yeast out of our bread? It is healthier - not only for the large number of people who are allergic to yeast, but for all of us. One significant health advantage to yeast-free bread is its value to digestion. While yeasted breads create, over time, an imbalance in our intestinal flora, yeast-free breads help to preserve that balance. And, as it contains strains of lactobacillus - an organism important for the proper digestion of complex carbohydrates - yeast-free bread is easier for our stomachs to break down and utilize.

If there are health benefits to yeast-free bread, then why not simply leave out the leavening process altogether? The answer is that the natural leavening process itself is beneficial for our bodies. Wheat grain contains phytic acid, a substance that has been linked to anemia, rickets, and nervous disorders. When bread is leavened naturally, 100% of the phytic acid is eliminated. If, on the other hand, bread is leavened with the help of baker's yeast, only 10% of the acid is removed.


Gluten Free since Jan. 06

Gluten intolerant. DQ 0301 DQ 0602

Lactose intolerant.

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