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myserenityprayer

Osteoporosis And Others Related To Celiac Disease

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So I have been doing a ton of reading on Celiac Disease on here and also with the billion books I purchased on living gluten free and related disorders. I have been reading a lot about osteoporosis and the increased likelihood of developing it later in life if you are intolerant to gluten.

I was wondering how early I should get a bone density test or if that is even necessary. Also, I would like to know from everyone what other conditions you have developed over time as a possible result from Celiac disease. Lastly, aside from just avoiding gluten how else can I prevent (if that's even possible) the development of other related conditions like osteoporosis? I just want to be healthy, feel good, and live a long life and I am willing to do whatever it takes. Hearing all of the other things that may come along with Celiac and really scary. I need to not be scared and learn earlier enough how to possibly prevent it and live a healthy life.


marissa

.be the change you wish to see in the world.

gluten free since august 3, 2006

soy free since september 9, 2006

positive blood test august 2, 2006

positive biopsy august 10, 2006

diagnosed with hoshimoto's hypothyroidism in 4th grade

diagnosed with PCOS sometime in high school

"genetically" extremely high cholesterol and tricyclycerides

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I don't know how old you are. But everybody diagnosed with celiac disease should have a bone density scan (except for maybe children). Some people here in their twenties already have osteoporosis.

If you don't have osteoporosis yet, then there is no good reason for you to still develop it while on the gluten-free diet (and preferably dairy free as well, as dairy appears to cause osteoporosis as well). The reason why people with celiac disease get osteoporosis is, that their villi are too damaged to absorb calcium. If your villi are healed, and you keep them that way, you should have no problem getting enough calcium.


I am a German citizen, married to a Canadian 29 years, four daughters, one son, seven granddaughters and four grandsons, with one more grandchild on the way in July 2009.

Intolerant to all lectins (including gluten), nightshades (potatoes, tomatoes, peppers, eggplant) and salicylates.

Asperger Syndrome, Tourette Syndrome, Addison's disease (adrenal insufficiency), hypothyroidism, fatigue syndrome, asthma

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I don't know how old you are. But everybody diagnosed with celiac disease should have a bone density scan (except for maybe children). Some people here in their twenties already have osteoporosis.

If you don't have osteoporosis yet, then there is no good reason for you to still develop it while on the gluten-free diet (and preferably dairy free as well, as dairy appears to cause osteoporosis as well). The reason why people with celiac disease get osteoporosis is, that their villi are too damaged to absorb calcium. If your villi are healed, and you keep them that way, you should have no problem getting enough calcium.

Thank you for your reply. I am 25 and should get a bone density test. Is that something my regular doctor should test me for?


marissa

.be the change you wish to see in the world.

gluten free since august 3, 2006

soy free since september 9, 2006

positive blood test august 2, 2006

positive biopsy august 10, 2006

diagnosed with hoshimoto's hypothyroidism in 4th grade

diagnosed with PCOS sometime in high school

"genetically" extremely high cholesterol and tricyclycerides

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Everbody who has been diagnosed with Celiac Disease should have a bone density scan. I was diagnosed with Osteoporosis at about age 12!!! I'm 14 now. The Celiac Diet and this infusion drug I'm taking is really helping though!! In osteopinia area (sp??) And next month I gt another bone scan, hopefully everything will be in the normal range.

Also I take Citrical. Talk to ur regular doctor about it.

*Citrical D*

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I am 43 and it took a small battle between my GI and insurance company to cover my bone density scan. My regular doctor said (knows nothing of Celiac but what I tell her) told me they'd never cover that test on someone my age. They did and I didn't even have a co-pay for it. Get the test now, then you'll have a baseline to refer to later. I have Ostopenia which is a pre-cursor to Osteoperosis. I'm hoping to reverse it with the supplements I take (combo pill of calcium, vit. D3 and mag) and weight bearing exercises. Luckily my numbers are not bad enough for the doc to push a calcium rx on me.


Dx'd with anemia - March 2005

Positive blood tests - Sept. 2005

Positive biopsy - Jan. 2006

Gluten free since 1-23-06

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So I have been doing a ton of reading on Celiac Disease on here and also with the billion books I purchased on living gluten free and related disorders. I have been reading a lot about osteoporosis and the increased likelihood of developing it later in life if you are intolerant to gluten.

I was wondering how early I should get a bone density test or if that is even necessary. Also, I would like to know from everyone what other conditions you have developed over time as a possible result from Celiac disease. Lastly, aside from just avoiding gluten how else can I prevent (if that's even possible) the development of other related conditions like osteoporosis? I just want to be healthy, feel good, and live a long life and I am willing to do whatever it takes. Hearing all of the other things that may come along with Celiac and really scary. I need to not be scared and learn earlier enough how to possibly prevent it and live a healthy life.

The National Osteoporosis Foundation recommends a BMD test for:

Women who are 65 and older, regardless of other risk factors

Postmenopausal women who have one or more of the following risk factors for osteoporosis:

small frame or low body weight (under 127 pounds)

inactive lifestyle

cigarette smoking

estrogen deficiency

lifetime of low calcium intake

alcoholism

all postmenopausal women who have had a fracture .

I would add to "lifetime of low calcium intake" (also low calcium absorption which can occur with celiac disease)

I have personally been having bone density tests since I was in my 40s because my Calcium levels were low. I was diagnosed with osteopenia (Loss of bone density, but not as bad as osteoporosis) many years ago (I am 60, and watch my blood calcium levels, since your body will pull calcium out of your bone to maintain blood levels) I have bone scans every 2 years. I think you should request an order from your physician for a bone scan now to see where you are. That will give you and your provider a baseline to determine where you should go with treatment from there.

Other problems I have experienced as a direct result of the Celiac is low hemoglobin, and slightly elevated liver enzymes. These are all common problems with celiac disease. Being an RN, I think has been an advantage for me, since I may think of some potential problems other patients may not. Also, I can request more frequent testing and my providers listen to me. But I think any patient can be proactive and be actively involved in watching out for themselves.

If you have Celiac disease and are rather new on the diet, your physician should be watching your blood work closely since as your bowel heals, you may start to absorb nutrients you did not absorb before. Lab work should be watched every 1-3 months depending on your situation, and if problems occur, even weekly until your levels are stable. Right now my physician has been ordering blood work every week as my calcium level has been up and down and kidney function has been affected also. A basic Metabolic panel along with hemoglobin will give your physician a pretty good idea of how you're doing. Electrolyte imbalances can also affect your emotional state since your brain depends on them to make chemicals that make you feel good. If you experience resistance from your physician to do these tests...you may want to find a physician that will proactively manage your Celiac disease and the resulting problems associated with it. I have found the younger physicians seem to know more about it, since it is now being taught more in med schools and is covered in questions on their board exams.

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