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Guest Kathy Ann

Trying To Build A New Lifestyle

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Guest Kathy Ann

Newbie with lots of allergies here.

I've been as gluten free as I know how to be for 6 months and don't feel well yet. I realize it takes time, but I'm wondering if I'm still getting gluten and don't know it. It's my next strategy to try.

This celiac thing is new to our family and no one else has been tested yet. So I am sharing a kitchen with A LOT of regular food being prepared. I've been trying to stay separate and thought I was doing OK. But I don't feel any better, so I'm wondering.

Which way have all you successful veterans gone? Did you finally have to turn your home/kitchen into a strict gluten-free zone to get honestly well? Or do you just carefully do everything separate from the rest of the family and hope not to get glutenized?

There's been a lot of discussion in this area. Sorry to bring it up again. But I need to know what has honestly worked for most of you, before I present my case to the rest of the family. I need to put myself in their place. It would be hard to not be able to eat what you wanted in your own home. No more convenient frozen pizzas, ice cream and grilled cheese sandwiches is hard enough for celiac folks, but doubly hard when you aren't celiac and when you're kids. They love me and want to see me well. But it will be hard for them to believe that such tiny amounts actually hurt me. I need to really know that it's true before I ask such a difficult sacrifice from them all.

I'm just asking for one more round of evidence from all of you that crumby countertops, dishwashers, dishcloths, shampoos and airborne particles REALLY DO MAKE ALL THE DIFFERENCE in some people.

Thanks....

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Kathy Ann,

One particle does make a huge difference. I would definately eliminate all gluten flours. There are some good gluten free breads out there. I like enjoy life or food for life if I don't make my own. They are expensive though. Enjoy life is free from 8 allergens. Their sandwich bread is good and (I think) can be eaten without toasting.

Maybe you could agree to have some of the frozen gluten foods for them. Try eliminating gluten bit by bit from the family. The most important part is double dipping from the bread to whatever and the flour dust in the air. Yes, the fridge handle and counters would still need to be washed down. Is it possible for the gluten eaters to have their own part of the counter, or if you have the counter space, their own counter?

My whole family is gluten free but my husband is the only one that doesn't have an active intolerance. We were tested by enterolab and they can't diagnose celiac. I would assume that is what we have since we all have at least one celiac gene. If find it much easier to have a gluten free home but understand the challenges that you'd face trying to do that. The bonus would be that if your husband and children are sensitive and don't know it, going gluten free at home would make it more noticeable. Do they use a microwave? If so, maybe you could make sure to not use the microwave. Do you work outside the home or are you home to be able to warm stuff up in the oven?

I'm sorry I can't offer you any conclusive advice on whether to get the family gluten free at home. My husband was willing to go gluten free. Even though he doesn't have an active intolerance, he has 2 celiac genes.

Kathy Ann,

Here is a link to some recipes I've posted. I need to add some more. If you have anything you're looking for let me know and I'll see if I have something that would work.

http://www.glutenfreeforum.com/index.php?showtopic=23795


Andrea

Enterolab positive results only June 06:
Me HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 1 0201; HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 2 0301; Serologic equivalent: HLA-DQ 2,3 (subtype 2, 7)
Husband HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 1 0201; HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 2 0302; Serologic equivalent: HLA-DQ 2,3 (subtype 2,8)



The whole family has been soy free since February, gluten free since June 2006.

The whole family went back to a gluten diet October 2011.  We never had official testing done and I decided to give gluten a go again.  At this point I've decided to work on making some gluten free things again, though healthwise everyone seems to be fine.  The decision to add gluten back in was also made based on other things I'd read about the 2nd sequence of genes.  It is my belief that we had a gluten intolerance, but thanks to things I've learned here, I know more what to keep an eye on.  If you have a confirmed case of celiac, please don't go back to gluten, it's a lifelong lifestyle change.

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Guest Kathy Ann

Everybody around here is used to me cooking and baking up a storm. Since my gluten, dairy, egg, etc. discovery, I have been barely cooking anymore and don't even eat with the family. I guess I'm feeling sorry for myself. I'll snap out of it.

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I have a husband and 4 children ages 9, 11, 13 and 15. I only allow gluten-free flours in the house. I do allow "regular" bread, since it is cheaper and my husband and 2 kids have no problems with it. I make almost everything gluten-free. All cookies, cakes, brownies, muffins, pancakes, waffles, etc are for everyone. With practice you can make all those taste yummy just like the regular version. All pasta and dinner food is gluten-free. Toast, sandwiches, french toast (in a separate pan) and low gluten cereals are the only gluten that is usually consumed at home. I ask everyone to clean up their crumbs. I think we've had frozen pizza before, but now I make it homemade and no one wants the frozen stuff. We have 2 toasters, one in the kitchen and one in the dining room to make sure no one "accidentally" contaminates mine.

Once you get used to it, it really isn't that hard. My kids like the food I make and I have nieces and nephews that are always amazed to find out that something is gluten-free. It's a little more expensive to make everything gluten-free, but not too bad, since I cook and bake from scratch.

My 15 year old daughter has decided on her own to go gluten-free since she realized that when she goes to friends' houses or to camp and eats a lot of wheat she feels sick. My 11 year old son has had problems that seem to be better when he's at least gluten "lite", so he eats gluten-free at home now. My hubby and 2 other kids don't suffer at all.


Liz

Started Specific Carbohydrate Diet on 8-16-09 because son was diagnosed with Ulcerative Colitis and want to give him moral support.

Diagnosed with Minimal Change Nephrotic Syndrome in 2003. Discovered that going completely gluten-free put me in remission.

I would have despaired unless I had believed that I would see the goodness of the Lord in the land of the living. Psalms 27:13

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Guest ~jules~

We are totally gluten free except for some of the kids packaged lunch things for school, and their bread. Its alot cheaper considering I have a husband who packs 2-3 sandwiches a day for lunch, and then one each for the boys. I just have a rule that the bread they use is only used on their "designated counter space" No regular bread is alowed anywhere on my designated counter space, which is way across the kitchen. Its working well so far, it seems really hardcore, but thats what I had to do. I've also always worn gloves when I clean the kitchen, now I am glad I do when I'm working on that counter space.. :P

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I run two home businesses, so I am home a lot to be able to prepare my own food. That helps. But I've been an overachieving supermom of sorts for my kid's entire lives. Everybody is used to me cooking and baking up a storm. Since my gluten, dairy, egg, etc. discovery, I have been barely cooking anymore and don't even eat with the family. I guess I'm grieving and probably feeling isolated and sorry for myself. I'll snap out of it.

You are allowed to grieve. It's part of the process. Annalise Roberts has a good cookbook. She does use egg and dairy though. I don't eat any dairy myself and just sub that out. Egg could be replaced with egg replacer or other egg substitute. I think it's Lorka150 or something like that that has other replacements she uses. It's just a matter of getting used to subbing. I've gone through the same thing in a way as you. I have not had much motivation for baking and cooking. We just returned to a meat eating diet again after being vegetarian or vegan for 8 years. I used to make everything from scratch too....lots of wheat and gluten (not to mention soy). I'm intolerant to both now.

Please let me know if you need any recipes for dairy type replacement. I still have the vegan cookbooks I used the most.

Remember to stop and smell the roses once in a while. You sound like you have a very full plate. :)


Andrea

Enterolab positive results only June 06:
Me HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 1 0201; HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 2 0301; Serologic equivalent: HLA-DQ 2,3 (subtype 2, 7)
Husband HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 1 0201; HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 2 0302; Serologic equivalent: HLA-DQ 2,3 (subtype 2,8)



The whole family has been soy free since February, gluten free since June 2006.

The whole family went back to a gluten diet October 2011.  We never had official testing done and I decided to give gluten a go again.  At this point I've decided to work on making some gluten free things again, though healthwise everyone seems to be fine.  The decision to add gluten back in was also made based on other things I'd read about the 2nd sequence of genes.  It is my belief that we had a gluten intolerance, but thanks to things I've learned here, I know more what to keep an eye on.  If you have a confirmed case of celiac, please don't go back to gluten, it's a lifelong lifestyle change.

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Guest Kathy Ann

Thanks, Andrea. Those recipes you included look great! Is the cashew mayonnaise really good? Mayonnaise is something I really miss. I can't have soy or eggs, so haven't found any recipes that have worked. I'm not even sure about vinegar either. It doesn't leave me much to work with. I was a vegan/vegetarian for many years too - only because I was so sick I thought it would help. I think it hurt me. I need meat. I really need it now, since I'm intolerant to so many other major proteins.

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I don't remember if I made that one before. I love cashews in a lot of things now. I have been buying store bought mayo with canola oil which isn't the best oil for you (depending on who you talk to :P ). I know cashews blend up really well since they are a softer nut. I was just looking through five loaves and newstart cookbooks. I don't have anything written next to the cashew mayo so I must not have tried it. I tried the tofu and wasn't too fond of it.

I do have a lot of cheese recipes I haven't tried that I'd be willing to post if you want to try them. I all for helping anyone and making use of these recipes. I certainly don't want to tell people to buy the books unless they can eat beans (including soy), since a lot of the recipes have soy or gluten in them. Of course I guess the same could be said of other cookbook too couldn't it? :P

BTW....I think my body's been happier being back on meat. The vegan/vegetarian diet is good for some but not for me.


Andrea

Enterolab positive results only June 06:
Me HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 1 0201; HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 2 0301; Serologic equivalent: HLA-DQ 2,3 (subtype 2, 7)
Husband HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 1 0201; HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 2 0302; Serologic equivalent: HLA-DQ 2,3 (subtype 2,8)



The whole family has been soy free since February, gluten free since June 2006.

The whole family went back to a gluten diet October 2011.  We never had official testing done and I decided to give gluten a go again.  At this point I've decided to work on making some gluten free things again, though healthwise everyone seems to be fine.  The decision to add gluten back in was also made based on other things I'd read about the 2nd sequence of genes.  It is my belief that we had a gluten intolerance, but thanks to things I've learned here, I know more what to keep an eye on.  If you have a confirmed case of celiac, please don't go back to gluten, it's a lifelong lifestyle change.

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Guest Kathy Ann

I have made a delicious "cheese" sauce from The Uncheese Cookbook I have from my vegan days. It does contain nutritional (brewer's) yeast, which concerns me now. But its base is cashews. I was just curious if the cashew mayonnaise actually mimicked real mayonnaise particularly. Probably not. I've started a couple of conversations on the board in the last two days and have decided from all the wise advice that maybe I need to cut it all down to just meat, vegetables and fruit for a few months. I need to do something. Time to take a deep breath and BE TOUGH.

Did I tell you that I have been a gourmet all my life and intensely love everything about food? I even intended to be a writer of health food cookbooks at one time and have compiled a TON of original recipes - all full of gluten, dairy and eggs. Now I'm starting all over again. Isn't that a kick in the teeth?! :blink::D

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I have made a delicious "cheese" sauce from The Uncheese Cookbook I have from my vegan days. It does contain nutritional (brewer's) yeast, which concerns me now. But its base is cashews. I was just curious if the cashew mayonnaise actually mimicked real mayonnaise particularly. Probably not. I've started a couple of conversations on the board in the last two days and have decided from all the wise advice that maybe I need to cut it all down to just meat, vegetables and fruit for a few months. I need to do something. Time to take a deep breath and BE TOUGH.

Did I tell you that I have been a gourmet all my life and intensely love everything about food? I even intended to be a writer of health food cookbooks at one time and have compiled a TON of original recipes - all full of gluten, dairy and eggs. Now I'm starting all over again. Isn't that a kick in the teeth?! :blink::D

Me, too. I was a member on a bunch of big food boards and I read them religiously. In fact, I was in the process of starting to write a cookbook on making seitan, imagine that.


Nothing

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Can I just answer a different way?

What is fair to your family is to have as fit and healthy mom superachiever as possible!

You define your own risks but having any gluten in the house is a risk.....

This sounds paranoid but consider hoovering and how it blows everything into the air....if it didn't they wouldn't have hypoallergenic bags for dust mites.

Sharing pans, dishcloths etc. etc. is just an accident waiting to happen. Sooner or later it will happen however careful you are because we are all just human.

As already said.... any milled flour is just a huge accident blackspot.... its really pretty definitive... shared dishwashers... only yesterday I found some glue in mine... well it wasn't glue it was dissolved rice tagliatelle but... it had fallen into the cutlery part and all the cutlery had it on in obvious amounts but it must have equally been spread across plates and pans.

The sensible thing to do if you have this is to limit it to stuff that is easily rincable.

My gluten-free's mom bought her cheerio's when she was in the US last week ....

She keeps them in a sealed box and when she has them she soaks them... rinces them and uses disposable paper towels to clean them. AFTER they are clean they get run through the dishwasher....

The question of bread.....is a toughy.... I mean I see the point gluten-free bread is yucky and expensive and if hubby needs his sandwiches in all practicality then.... you can really minimise the risk by inverting the gluten free area and have a seperate gluten area with its own knives ... paper towels and all. Wash all gluten stufff seperately....

I think it also depends on the gluten... for instance rice crispies have the horedin malt but its a wash whereas a wheat cereal has .. well little particles that get everywhere....


Fere libenter homines id quod volunt credunt. (JC, De Bello Gallico Liber III/XVIII)

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I'm the only one who is gluten-free in my house. My wife and 2 small children still partake of the forbidden fruit. It actually is less of a lifestyle change than you would think. As mentioned earlier crumbs and cross contamination are our biggest enemies. We all slip up and forget to read a label now and then, but that comes with the territory. As the primary grocery-getter and cook (even pre-gluten-free) I have a good handle on what comes in the house. We've never really eaten out of boxes, so for the most part, meal time was only a minor adjustment. Once you get used to shopping gluten-free and are confident in what is in the pantry, prepping gluten-free meals for all is a snap - if you know your ingredients are gluten-free, it is hard to go wrong. Really the only non-gluten-free items in our house are cereals, bread, some condiments and snacks. I label my butter and condiments to keep them crumb free. Some things can be a hassle, like pizza - I make 2, one regular, the other gluten-free. We use a lot of paper plates, and rinse everything prior to loading the dishwashwer.

I guess my point is your family can still enjoy non-gluten-free food, but you'll need to lay down the law and make sure everyone knows the danger of cross contamination and does their part to keep the kitchen clean. Depending on the ages of the kids involved this may be more of a challenge. In my case the kids are so young they'll never know any other way. It can be done, but everyone needs to be on the same page.

This board is a great resource for helpful hints, recipes, "DO's and DON'Ts", and updates on what's gluten-free. Lurking around here and searching through old posts, or just asking a simple question will go a long way. The way i look at this board - we're all gluten-free (or know someome gluten-free), we all do it a little differently, but we're all doing it. You'll find a way that works for you. We're all here to help!


Richard

"Not all who wander are lost" - J.R.R. Tolkien

Diagnosed 3/8/05

Sister also Celiac

Risus remedium optimum est

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Hello Kathy Ann!

It is my feeling that when someone needs to be on a special diet to be well, it's time for a family meeting. If everyone can agree to put forth some personal effort in the "sacrifice," all will be happier in the long run, in my view.

In my own experience, we have a grown child who has chosen to go gluten free because if a lifetime of IBS and her husband is now gluten free too. So when they come over to eat, or when we eat together at their house, I feel comfortable that there has been no gluten around. My husband (who I think has some symptoms of gltuen intolerance, or celiac or whatever) thinks I am just crazy (self-diagnosed/self-treated), but he still likes it when i feel good, rather than when I am sick, miserable and paranoid about everything. So he doesn't expect to eat anything with gluten in the house. I'm the cook, so he goes along with whatever foods I prepare.

He eats gluteny stuff away from home, and buys himself some packaged snacks with gluten that don't really end up in the kitchen, but just as stuff he eats directly from the package while watching a movie or whatever (Little Debbie snacks, etc). If I had other family members who wanted to do this sort of thing, I would ask them to devote one room to gluten treats...have a microwave, maybe even a small refrigerator in there, and allow them to make themselves treats and snacks, enjoy off of paper plates, and they can be in charge of the cleanup of that area. I just believe the person with the obvious problem needs to know the major food preparation and meal areas they must survive in are SAFE.

I was hesitant to say this, but I am vegan and have been for 10 years, and make nutritional yeast cheese substitutes all the time. I also make sure I include B12 daily, because it's hard both for vegans and for people who have gluten problems to get enough. I hesitate to call myself celiac, because I have not even bothered consulting a doctor about this. I have no faith in doctors anymore the way they caused me so many problems in the past. But for whatever reason, I was having pretty bad, worsening intestinal problems for years and finally am feeling pretty good now after having gotten extremely paranoid about gluten anywhere in the kitchen and remaining as gluten free as possible for 8 months now.

During my venture with de-glutening myself over these past several months, I started noticing how little it would take to set me off into a cycle of intestinal turmoil that would last for at least a couple of weeks: one time I was throwing out a bag of wheat berries ( I used to grind my own wheat). I decided to throw them outside instead of just tossing them into the trash, so I was pouring them out of the bag and the wind was kicking up dust as they fell to the ground. I was amazed that my symptoms increased a few days later and I suffered worse for a while. Another time I washed my face with a facial scrub I'd bought a long time ago and didn't even think to check ingredient; again, a few days later the cycle of turmoil kicked up again and I finally tracked it down to reading the facial scrub label--wheat germ oil! I took a gulp from a friend's beer, soon after I had two days of illness (that time was quick and easy!). Still, in my own experience, it seems to pay to be very careful about this. I would try to get my family to see how important their compliance and understanding is for me to have ordinary, normal health.

I had suspected gluten back 5 years ago and tried going gluten free in a more "relaxed" way. It didn't work and I gave up.

This time I've been diligent, and now, 8 months later, I can finally see the light! It's amazing, but it seems each crumb does count.

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We finally had to go gluten-free in our home. When my careless 16 year old boy is off to college, I may be able to relax that rule, but he didn't take the time to think that the regular bread should not be squashed on top of my gluten-free bread in the refrigerator, wouldn't think about making a sandwich then touching all the gluten-free stuff (like carrots or chips) he wanted with his contaminated hands, and other such things. He also refused to respect the rules of the "gluten counter." I have six kids, but he is literally the only one I had any trouble with. If kids and hubby will respect the "safety rules" I think you can have a mixed household ... maybe.

We got rid of dishclothes and only use paper towels because of the few glutenous foods, plus now that we've done it for a while, it just seems more sanitary. I'm not as strict as Steve/gfp, all the dishes go in the dishwasher. If they order pizza, they eat it outside, then any leftovers are placed in a sealed plastic bag that is not reopened until it's back outside.

I do buy packaged snacks for the kids to take to school, and I will ocassionally buy pretzels (don't leave the same bad crumbs everywhere like bread). Since my 18 year old daughter is now gluten-free and does all the baking, she usually bakes from gluten-free mixes now. At Christmas we'll give gluten-free flour a try.

I only cook gluten-free. I use Tinkyada pasta. Other than never serving bread at the table, you would never guess the meal was gluten-free. Fresh foods are naturally gluten-free, it's usually what we add or how we cook them that adds the gluten. I found no one even noticed that last Thanksgiving was gluten-free.

I only eat fresh food that I've prepared myself. When I feel 100% better, I'll chance eating out at a restaurant with a gluten-free menu, but right now I only do that when I visit my daughter at her college. But there is another board member who lives there and has trained a restaurant. They also have a Cheeseburger in Paradise, which has a gluten-free menu, so I'll eat there.

Edit -- I forgot to mention, even though I'm also dairy-free, I don't worry about it so much. Dairy isn't as insidious as gluten ... there just simply aren't crumbs left around.


gluten-free 12/05

diagnosed with Lyme Disease 12/06

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Guest Kathy Ann

Thanks for all the great input everybody!

Just a quick comment to Katherine. (I don't know how to do that thing where you all include the part you are commenting on with your reply - I'm a bit technology challenged :blink: )

I bought a seitan cookbook several years back and ate seitan versions of everything imaginable. Thought it was fun and interesting how they actually tasted like meat. I kept that up for weeks. Can you imagine what that was doing to me?! :( It's amazing how much damage you can do to yourself out of pure ignorance.

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Thanks for all the great input everybody!

Just a quick comment to Katherine. (I don't know how to do that thing where you all include the part you are commenting on with your reply - I'm a bit technology challenged :blink: )

I bought a seitan cookbook several years back and ate seitan versions of everything imaginable. Thought it was fun and interesting how they actually tasted like meat. I kept that up for weeks. Can you imagine what that was doing to me?! :( It's amazing how much damage you can do to yourself out of pure ignorance.

I ate that stuff, too. It's pure gluten!!! Used to rip me up so I didn't eat it very many times!!


gluten-free 12/05

diagnosed with Lyme Disease 12/06

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I actually feel that beginning the vegan diet was what really set me off having symptoms. Vegans just say you have an initial intestinal reaction when first starting vegan, or you "detox," etc., so I ignored the symptoms for a long time until they became more pronounced, more bothersome, steadier and steadier until they were there everyday, all teh time, and finally, started to keep me from doing things I would normally take part in.

It's really difficult maintaining a vegan diet when you discover gluten is messing you up. I am having difficulty finding other vegans with this problem, too. MOst of them deny that anything coming from a plant could wreak such havoc on a person's health.

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Thanks for all the great input everybody!

Just a quick comment to Katherine. (I don't know how to do that thing where you all include the part you are commenting on with your reply - I'm a bit technology challenged :blink: )

I bought a seitan cookbook several years back and ate seitan versions of everything imaginable. Thought it was fun and interesting how they actually tasted like meat. I kept that up for weeks. Can you imagine what that was doing to me?! :( It's amazing how much damage you can do to yourself out of pure ignorance.

You click the little "reply" button in the lower right hand corner of the post. It will bring up the reply window with the text of the current post in it, which you may edit to remove the irrelevant parts.

I even made a "mock steak" that totally looked like a steak, colored with beet juice, paprika, and cocoa, with a white strip around the outside. Those were the days...


Nothing

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Guest Kathy Ann

You click the little "reply" button in the lower right hand corner of the post. It will bring up the reply window with the text of the current post in it, which you may edit to remove the irrelevant parts.

Hey Katherine....is this cool or what?! Thanks for the computer instruction! Now I might at least look like I know what I'm doing.

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Did I tell you that I have been a gourmet all my life and intensely love everything about food? I even intended to be a writer of health food cookbooks at one time and have compiled a TON of original recipes - all full of gluten, dairy and eggs. Now I'm starting all over again. Isn't that a kick in the teeth?! :blink::D

No, you hadn't mentioned that that I've seen. That sounds great! Now instead of gluten, dairy and eggs, you can create a cookbook without those ingredients. Of course I'd love to see something that you create! :D


Andrea

Enterolab positive results only June 06:
Me HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 1 0201; HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 2 0301; Serologic equivalent: HLA-DQ 2,3 (subtype 2, 7)
Husband HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 1 0201; HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 2 0302; Serologic equivalent: HLA-DQ 2,3 (subtype 2,8)



The whole family has been soy free since February, gluten free since June 2006.

The whole family went back to a gluten diet October 2011.  We never had official testing done and I decided to give gluten a go again.  At this point I've decided to work on making some gluten free things again, though healthwise everyone seems to be fine.  The decision to add gluten back in was also made based on other things I'd read about the 2nd sequence of genes.  It is my belief that we had a gluten intolerance, but thanks to things I've learned here, I know more what to keep an eye on.  If you have a confirmed case of celiac, please don't go back to gluten, it's a lifelong lifestyle change.

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I actually feel that beginning the vegan diet was what really set me off having symptoms. Vegans just say you have an initial intestinal reaction when first starting vegan, or you "detox," etc., so I ignored the symptoms for a long time until they became more pronounced, more bothersome, steadier and steadier until they were there everyday, all teh time, and finally, started to keep me from doing things I would normally take part in.

It's really difficult maintaining a vegan diet when you discover gluten is messing you up. I am having difficulty finding other vegans with this problem, too. MOst of them deny that anything coming from a plant could wreak such havoc on a person's health.

Spunky,

I hear you. I was lacto-ovo for about 3 years, ovo for about 1, and vegan for another 3. I made my own gluten, bread, baked goods etc. Also went soy crazy and made my own tofu for awhile and tried making soymilk. I wouldn't be surprised if the amount of gluten and soy I was having set me off either. With my other intolerances it was impossible to stay on the vegan diet. I personally compensate with buying the best meat I can.


Andrea

Enterolab positive results only June 06:
Me HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 1 0201; HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 2 0301; Serologic equivalent: HLA-DQ 2,3 (subtype 2, 7)
Husband HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 1 0201; HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 2 0302; Serologic equivalent: HLA-DQ 2,3 (subtype 2,8)



The whole family has been soy free since February, gluten free since June 2006.

The whole family went back to a gluten diet October 2011.  We never had official testing done and I decided to give gluten a go again.  At this point I've decided to work on making some gluten free things again, though healthwise everyone seems to be fine.  The decision to add gluten back in was also made based on other things I'd read about the 2nd sequence of genes.  It is my belief that we had a gluten intolerance, but thanks to things I've learned here, I know more what to keep an eye on.  If you have a confirmed case of celiac, please don't go back to gluten, it's a lifelong lifestyle change.

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Spunky,

I hear you. I was lacto-ovo for about 3 years, ovo for about 1, and vegan for another 3. I made my own gluten, bread, baked goods etc. Also went soy crazy and made my own tofu for awhile and tried making soymilk. I wouldn't be surprised if the amount of gluten and soy I was having set me off either. With my other intolerances it was impossible to stay on the vegan diet. I personally compensate with buying the best meat I can.

Wow,

Thanks everyone for your insight on this issue. I am feeling like a "Gluten-free Nazi" in my home and now at work. BUT, I think maybe I'm going to have to request that all gluten at school stays at the big round table AWAY from me! Including asking my partner, who I've worked with for five years and is one of my best friends, to only eat there. He has been so cautious and watched me struggle every day for a year, first, just to get to work, then to STAY, so he really cares about helping me. But sometimes I just feel like such a whiney sap when I'm focusing ever so intensely on the possibility of cross-contamination. But here I see perhaps I'm not insane- it really just doesn't take much to set this lunatic digestive system off!

Thanks for keeping me sane.

lisa

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Well, in your other thread I recommended Elaine Gottschall's book, so in this one, I'll recommend Loren Cordain's "Paleo Diet." It goes into how so many of our health issues today are "diseases of civilization" (i.e. your friendly neighborhood caveman didn't have heart disease, diabetes, indigestion, IBS, mental illness, asthma, or any of the other crap killing us today) and may convince you that your whole family should be grain, dairy, and sugar-free. It's a lot easier cooking the same meal for everyone, and it'll be a lot healthier for them in the long run too.

This is also the diet that fixed my issues (including my asthma and acne, which I originally had no idea were food-related) when just eliminating gluten and other food allergies didn't do anything noticeable.

The paleo diet is obviously stricter than just going gluten free, but it's easier and cheaper because you're not hunting down and buying all this exotic gluten-free stuff. You're just buying fresh meat, veggies, fruits, nuts, and herbs, which you can get at any grocery store. It's also the most uber-healthy diet you can get on. I can't help but cringe when I see people at Whole Foods buying all these gluten free breads and cookies, which are loaded with salt, sugar, and unnatural preservatives... How exactly is that any better for your body than whatever you were eating before? Ugh.

Anyway, excuse my rant. The point of my post was to suggest your whole family would be better off not eating grains, dairy, and sugar on a regular basis.

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Kathy, I'm sure you already know this but there's a growing interest in eating a paleo-style of diet (not necessarily raw, most of us cook our food), the diet that human kind has been eating for much longer than agriculture has been around. I know I would love to have more cookbooks around dedicated to cooking whole, natural foods in the paleo style. I did find one which is great, "Garden of Eating".

Anyway, I find that cooking meat and veggies (and even fruit) is quite a lot of fun. My favorite thing I'm into now is exploring the wild world of rubs and cures for meats. Yummmmm!

I also think you should take the whole family with you. You're going to be eating the healthiest diet for humans, why wouldn't you want to share that with your family?

My Mom was very interested in nutrition and you wouldn't believe the stuff she had us eating in the 1960's and 1970's. LOL! It probably did me a world of good though.

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"what is fair to the rest of the family?"

i always tell my kids that there is no such thing as fair.


Christine

15 year old twins with celiac, diagnosed dec. 2005

11 year old daughter with celiac diagnosed dec 2005

17 year old son with celiac gene

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