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lonewolf

For Those Of You With Dogs

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I know there are dog forums out there, but since I'm on this one and don't want to have to "get to know" a bunch of new people, I thought I'd ask you all.

We have our cute little puppy who is now almost 11 weeks old. He's Lab, Pointer and Boxer, but looks all Lab. We're trying to get him to play "fetch". He chases the ball and then sits and chews on it. So, my question is, is he just too little for fetch? Or do pointers and Boxers not like to play? We've never had such a young puppy, so maybe we're expecting him to learn too fast. It actually seems reasonable that this is normal puppy behavior, but then at what age will he want to play? My boys are impatient and want to play fetch with him so badly.

We had a yellow Lab years ago who would play fetch by the hour. We would have to wear gloves because the ball would be so disgusting. We're hoping Buddy will like to play like this too.


Liz

Started Specific Carbohydrate Diet on 8-16-09 because son was diagnosed with Ulcerative Colitis and want to give him moral support.

Diagnosed with Minimal Change Nephrotic Syndrome in 2003. Discovered that going completely gluten-free put me in remission.

I would have despaired unless I had believed that I would see the goodness of the Lord in the land of the living. Psalms 27:13

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This is quite normal behavior. My older girl (12) LOVES to play fetch, always has, but even as a puppy would just play with whatever was thrown and for limited time....as she got older she learned to bring it back. But.....even now, she HATES to drop the ball, likes to play keepaway with me. My younger girl, whom I found on the highway when she was about 3, had never played with a ball or toy and didn't know how to catch it at all. She can now catch it (IT"S THE CUTEST THING EVER AS SHE IS STILL UNCOORDINATED WITH IT) but can't really bring it back.

All dogs like to "fetch" differently...or not at all. Seems that the retrievers will in fact do it for hours on end but not all dogs care about it. I hope that is not the case with yours but time will tell.....I think the more it is done for them, and the more they realize it is fun, they will be more inclinced to do it.


SUSIE

Diagnosed January 2006

"I like nonsense. It wakes up the brain cells." ~Dr. Seuss

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My dog is a terrier-hound mix, and he's way more interested in 'keep-away' and tug than fetch. The retrievers are the only ones really bred for it. As a puppy, he'd take the toy and race off with it to the bathroom or somewhere else, or he'd goad me into trying to take it from him, and then try not to let me at the last minute. Now, when I throw his ball and he chases it, if I get really excited and clap my hands, and say "Bring it back!" he does, about 30% of the time......... But it's nothing to do with a sense of duty to return the toy to me, it's only because he wants me to throw it again. Ah well. Fetch is fun, but so are other games. And a lot of the time, he's as entertained by chewing on his toy himself, or throwing it and catching it, and I don't have to be involved. That comes in handy when I have to study :)


Enterolab:

Fecal Antigliadin IgA 20 (Normal Range <10 Units)

Fecal Antitissue Transglutaminase IgA 9 Units (Normal Range <10 Units)

Quantitative Microscopic Fecal Fat Score 1223 Units (Normal Range <300 Units)

Fecal Anti-Soy IgA 18 Units (Normal Range <10 Units)

Serologic equivalent: HLA-DQ 3,3 (Subtype 8,7)

Gastritis dx 10/24

Eosinophilia of large bowel dx 10/29

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My dog sounds like yours, he likes to play keep-away with his balls, which he has a strange affliction for. We got him from the shelter when he was about 3 years old and only 80 pounds, up to a nice 115 now, and he would pee every time he even saw a ball. We actually had to keep them out of the house so he would stop peeing on the carpet.

He has outgrown that now, 6 years later, but keeps his balls congregated by his food bowls, keeps 2 or 3 in there at a time, and when he gets a ball, will just sit and chew on them for hours. My kids love his ball fettish and call me into the kitchen to look at all the balls piled around his food bowl. He has quite a selection. He even keeps them in his mouth when he goes out to pee, keeps it in his mouth the whole time, then comes back in with it, never having left his mouth.

When he was outside a lot, he used to chew and play with rocks, landscape rocks, not those pretty rocks, the big heavy ones. Yep, gotta love my baby.

Oh, vet thinks he is rotwiler, lab, chesepeak (sp?) bay retreiver, and mastif mix.


-Kate

gluten-free since July 2004

Other Intolerances:

Strawberries and Banannas (2007)

Nitrates (April 2006)

Yeast (which includes all vinegar so no condiments) (Oct. 2004)

Peanuts (Nov. 2004)

Soy (Oct. 2004)

Almonds (Sept. 2004)

Corn (Sept. 2004)

Lactose/Casein (1999)

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My dog sounds like yours, he likes to play keep-away with his balls, which he has a strange affliction for. We got him from the shelter when he was about 3 years old and only 80 pounds, up to a nice 115 now,

Oh wow! I'm sure my 9 year old would ask to ride him!


Liz

Started Specific Carbohydrate Diet on 8-16-09 because son was diagnosed with Ulcerative Colitis and want to give him moral support.

Diagnosed with Minimal Change Nephrotic Syndrome in 2003. Discovered that going completely gluten-free put me in remission.

I would have despaired unless I had believed that I would see the goodness of the Lord in the land of the living. Psalms 27:13

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Beats the heck out of me . . . . our two dogs -- one's a Teacup Toy poodle and one's a Basenji / Australian Cattle Dog mix just sit there and look at you like, "You idiot. What in the H*ll did you do that for?"


Lynne

Courage does not always roar. Sometimes it is the quiet voice at the end of the day that says, "I'll try tomorrow".

"There's not a word yet, for old friends we've just met. Part Heaven, part space, or have I found my place? You can just visit, but I plan to stay, I'm going to go back there some day." Gonzo, in the Muppet Movie

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My friend's boxer loves to play, but not fetch. My lab mix likes to play keepaway the best. My puppy just likes to run and jump.


Dessa

The Lord bless you and keep you; the Lord make His face shine upon you and be gracious to you." Numbers 6:24-25

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All dogs can be taught to fetch but retreivers are obviously the easiest to train because its instinctive.

It all depends on your relationship with your dog....

My moms dog won't fetch for her because my mom lets her boss her about..... but once the dog realises its place and the fact fetch makes you happy AND is fun then they will all do it....

My moms dog will play fetch with me but noone else..... then again she won't jump on the furniture or bark at the postman when Im home.... (about twice a year).... my mom is always scared or discipling the dog ... which works out badly... when I go home the dog is so excited yet my mom thinks if she disciplines it she won't love her????

So far this has had the dog trapped in a car door (because she wouldn't stay and sooner or later I guess a car accident) ... dogs need smacks.... however I'd never hit a dog harder or even as hard as I play with them.... the point isn't to hurt them its to show disapproval in a doggy way.... like any good mother dog does with her pups.

At the same time you have to show approval in a doggy way.... this can look silly in public but all the same its what needed IMHO.... the dog will only fetch so long as its making you esctatically happy..... if it won't let go a rolled newspaper on the nose works well....(but just a tap) pretty soon you don't need to actually tap them at all.... just picking up the newspaper will work.... then whenthey associate your angry no..... you no longer need the paper ... however I good tummy rub or behind the ears never gets old!

The hardest dogs to train are alpha females..... by far. They are only slightly easier than cats!

Anyway this has always worked for me even with "untrainable dogs" and older ones....


Fere libenter homines id quod volunt credunt. (JC, De Bello Gallico Liber III/XVIII)

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I know there are dog forums out there, but since I'm on this one and don't want to have to "get to know" a bunch of new people, I thought I'd ask you all.

We have our cute little puppy who is now almost 11 weeks old. He's Lab, Pointer and Boxer, but looks all Lab. We're trying to get him to play "fetch". He chases the ball and then sits and chews on it. So, my question is, is he just too little for fetch? Or do pointers and Boxers not like to play? We've never had such a young puppy, so maybe we're expecting him to learn too fast. It actually seems reasonable that this is normal puppy behavior, but then at what age will he want to play? My boys are impatient and want to play fetch with him so badly.

We had a yellow Lab years ago who would play fetch by the hour. We would have to wear gloves because the ball would be so disgusting. We're hoping Buddy will like to play like this too.

Hi Liz

we just got our new puppy- she is eleven weeks as well!!! when i throw a ball she also just chews it!

i dont know much cause its our first dog. im sure ill have lots of questions though!

Jess


Diagnosed in March 2006 after being in the hospital due to pancreatitis due to undiagnosed celiac

years of being told i had IBS, taking numerous IBS medications (since the age of fifteen)

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Hi Liz

we just got our new puppy- she is eleven weeks as well!!! when i throw a ball she also just chews it!

i dont know much cause its our first dog. im sure ill have lots of questions though!

Jess

I guess it's just a puppy thing. I won't worry about it for a while.

What kind of dog do you have?

Steve - I agree with what you're saying about letting the dog know who's in charge. It's kind of like having kids. If they think they're in charge they're insecure and behave badly. Our dog is loved, but definitely getting the message that he is the DOG, not a pampered guest in our home.


Liz

Started Specific Carbohydrate Diet on 8-16-09 because son was diagnosed with Ulcerative Colitis and want to give him moral support.

Diagnosed with Minimal Change Nephrotic Syndrome in 2003. Discovered that going completely gluten-free put me in remission.

I would have despaired unless I had believed that I would see the goodness of the Lord in the land of the living. Psalms 27:13

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if it won't let go a rolled newspaper on the nose works well....(but just a tap) pretty soon you don't need to actually tap them at all.... just picking up the newspaper will work.... then whenthey associate your angry no..... you no longer need the paper

This cracks me up....I used the rolled up newspaper to train, it was quite effective (I gave a gentle swat on the rump)....but sometimes in a hurry I grap a newspapaer and roll it to swat a fly. oh my gosh....this gives the dogs a nervous breakdown, I forget every time...and they run back and hide in the back room, or go outside and hide by the back fence, cowering...I have to cajole them in with biscuits and tummy rubs and they are STILL scared! So sensitive - I must get a flyswatter! :lol:

And the training....as Steve said must be in dog's understanding. A very sharp command voice, low, loud and gutteral or a deep growl is quite effective. I have seen the most misbehaved dogs at friends' houses and when I hear the voice they use to "admonish" - it's like a whiny child and the dogs never learn. don't even get me started!


SUSIE

Diagnosed January 2006

"I like nonsense. It wakes up the brain cells." ~Dr. Seuss

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I agree with the retriever comment, some dogs don't have the instinct or haven't developed it yet

With my dog (miniature poodle), we slowly taught her how to play fetch when she was about 12-13 weeks. I'd throw her something maybe 5 inches away, and then encourage her to pick it up and bring it back to me. Lots of praise for bringing it back. I'd increase the distance after a few successful retrieves. She has a few coordination problems (due to some brain damage) but she's a great little girl and learnt how to do it because I think it's in her genes to do it. Nowadays she'll drop the ball or toy at our feet and look up at us to throw it - so. cute.


wheat free & yeast free since may '06

also lactose intolerant

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If your having trouble with your dog, I recomend

http://www.howtotalkdog.com

Any dog, any breed, any background, any age can be taught to be a good dog (and do tricks like fetch..) if you are willing to spend the time with the critter.

For example, I do ministry visits with for my church, and more then once we walked in to the a house where a dog was out of contorl, and with out hurting the dog in any way, I had them calm and happy at my feet. Most cases it takes less then a minute. No one ever believes me till they see it happen. I am far form a expert and I would not want to test my skills on a truly vicuous dog, but there are plenty of ppl that do.

There is more then one valid and effective way to do it. I have learned two completely different ways that both work every time I have tried either of them. The one linked above is just the easiest one to remember the website of :)

The key ingredents are first TIME, and second CONTROL. Dogs want a master, and you need step up to the plate. Once they understand that you have accepted the role of master, they will live to serve you. It is in thier nature.

I do mean any dog, the last one I worked with was a pit bull in a realy bad part of town. :o

My dog, little joe, we rescued out of a very bad situtation. He learned to be a real alpha dog and a fighter. Now, everyone tells us he is the sweetest dog. Why? Becuase he has accepted me as his master. And yes he obeys my wife too when I am not home. He is happy, he found a place where he does not have to be the master. :)


- Vincent -

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When training the dogs I have had, I take a spray bottle of water and spray them when they are doing something wrong. It doesn't hurt them, but they sure don't like it very much.

I don't know how old your boys are, but they might want to try blowing bubbles in the air and letting the dog chase them. I had a dog that did that, and it was the funniest thing to watch, and it would be fun for the kids too. :D


Diagnosed with Celiac Disease April 2005

Diabetic

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If your having trouble with your dog,

Hehehe. I don't think I'm having trouble with the dog, just wondering if he's too young to fetch. But, I do agree that people need to be the "alpha" in a person/dog relationship.


Liz

Started Specific Carbohydrate Diet on 8-16-09 because son was diagnosed with Ulcerative Colitis and want to give him moral support.

Diagnosed with Minimal Change Nephrotic Syndrome in 2003. Discovered that going completely gluten-free put me in remission.

I would have despaired unless I had believed that I would see the goodness of the Lord in the land of the living. Psalms 27:13

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Hehehe. I don't think I'm having trouble with the dog, just wondering if he's too young to fetch. But, I do agree that people need to be the "alpha" in a person/dog relationship.

I thought of that site cause one of the first few lessons they teach is (well after potty training) was fetching, and I think it was like 15 weeks... but I lent out my materails and not seen them since so cant double check that right now.


- Vincent -

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I thought of that site cause one of the first few lessons they teach is (well after potty training) was fetching, and I think it was like 15 weeks... but I lent out my materails and not seen them since so cant double check that right now.

Thank you Vincent! You answered my original question! Teaching fetch at 15 weeks. Now I won't worry for another month!


Liz

Started Specific Carbohydrate Diet on 8-16-09 because son was diagnosed with Ulcerative Colitis and want to give him moral support.

Diagnosed with Minimal Change Nephrotic Syndrome in 2003. Discovered that going completely gluten-free put me in remission.

I would have despaired unless I had believed that I would see the goodness of the Lord in the land of the living. Psalms 27:13

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This cracks me up....I used the rolled up newspaper to train, it was quite effective (I gave a gentle swat on the rump)....but sometimes in a hurry I grap a newspapaer and roll it to swat a fly. oh my gosh....this gives the dogs a nervous breakdown, I forget every time...and they run back and hide in the back room, or go outside and hide by the back fence, cowering...I have to cajole them in with biscuits and tummy rubs and they are STILL scared! So sensitive - I must get a flyswatter! :lol:

And the training....as Steve said must be in dog's understanding. A very sharp command voice, low, loud and gutteral or a deep growl is quite effective. I have seen the most misbehaved dogs at friends' houses and when I hear the voice they use to "admonish" - it's like a whiny child and the dogs never learn. don't even get me started!

You just described my mom ......perfectly.... that is until she starts screaming at the dog to shut up... which of course just excites and confuses the dog more. She is a pretty stupid dog to start off ...

Thank you Vincent! You answered my original question! Teaching fetch at 15 weeks. Now I won't worry for another month!

No harm in starting .... I mean the whole thing is a game you are both meant to enjoy.

Start off just on the floor with a toy wrestling over it and getting the dog to drop on command, this is instinctive in all dogs because its what the mom does if they pick something up they shouldn't....

Almost any dog will drop if you learn the point on the jaw to press (some pit bulls truly won't but then they wouldn't if you hit them with a baseball bat...) then its pile on the love and rewards to show it was good and then give them the toy back to show its your toy BUT they can play with it. At this point they are forgettful and easily distracted ... so training is harder but not impossible... remember a dog is trained because it wants to please YOU. This is the absolute bottomline to remember ... an older dog will know and associate you being pleased easily, a dumb puppy will need you to be more explicit....

drop toy = happy master :D

happy master = exctatic dog :P

They should come with an owners manual that just says "loves to please" ...

Like Vincent says a happy dog is one who knows how to please his master....


Fere libenter homines id quod volunt credunt. (JC, De Bello Gallico Liber III/XVIII)

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If your having trouble with your dog, I recomend

http://www.howtotalkdog.com

Any dog, any breed, any background, any age can be taught to be a good dog (and do tricks like fetch..) if you are willing to spend the time with the critter.

So funny that you mention that, because I was about to recommend a book called "How to Speak Dog" by Stanley Coren. Totally unrelated to the site you posted, although it also looks good.

I think all dogs can be trained, but it also helps to understand limitations of the breed and the individual dog, and play to its strengths. My dog acts like a circus dog. Loves to trot around on his hind feet; not so fond of fetch. So all our tricks focus on what comes more or less naturally to his breed. It still tests his obedience, but in a way that's more fun for him and doesn't confuse the heck out of his wee, addled brain. To wit, he will "waltz," if you hum the correct tune, stand up and "hold hands" on command, give "hugs," and walk from person to person on his hind feet. It all makes him deliriously happy.

Also, this book is tons of fun, and actually useful, too:

http://www.amazon .com/Dog-Owners-Manual-In...3427204?ie=UTF8

The jack russell featured in the book (among other breeds) and gracing the cover is just like Eddie, except Eddie is tuxedo in stead of white and brown.


Enterolab:

Fecal Antigliadin IgA 20 (Normal Range <10 Units)

Fecal Antitissue Transglutaminase IgA 9 Units (Normal Range <10 Units)

Quantitative Microscopic Fecal Fat Score 1223 Units (Normal Range <300 Units)

Fecal Anti-Soy IgA 18 Units (Normal Range <10 Units)

Serologic equivalent: HLA-DQ 3,3 (Subtype 8,7)

Gastritis dx 10/24

Eosinophilia of large bowel dx 10/29

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Funny, my enormous standard poodle, being the clown of the dog breed family, will run after a thrown ball and he's suddenly in the circus...parading about, tossing the ball loosely up and catching it, circling so all the adoring audience can see him. It's gotten so hilarious that we just let him entertain...I no longer try to get him to return the ball to my upturned hand. So much for a retriever, which the standard poodle originally was...too much Ringling Brothers in them, now!


Emily

diagnosed type one diabetic 1973

diagnosed celiac winter 2005

diagnosed hypothyroid spring 2006

But healthy and happy! 253.gif

11 year-old Son had negative blood panel, but went on gluten-free diet of his own volition to see if his concentration would improve, his temper abate, and his energy level would increase. Miraculous response!

The great are great only because we are on our knees.

--Pierre Joseph Proudhon (1809-1865)

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My dog loves to chase whatever you throw, but then prefers to chew on it for a spell. When he's ready to go again, he brings it me and drops it. I can MAKE him drop it, but I like sitting and standing around while he chews the ball, it gives me time to experience what's around me or pull some weeds or read from a book or whatever. Now that he's older (and has arthritis), it's good for him not to run that much really hard, and so in the long run, it's turned out his habit is now saving his elbow. I figure that the times we're playing ball and walking about are his times, so I try to let him do what he wants within reason. (No, I don't have an ill behaved dog because of this - he can still know who is boss during his playtime.)

I think it's important to remember to let our dogs be who they are going to be. I don't mean unruly monsters - but each doggie has a personality that we owe to them to let bloom. I go nuts when I see people at the dog park with herding dogs trying to make their dogs stop barking and chasing the other dogs. Hello? Did you not read the manual? Boxers love to wrestle and clown about, pointers and labs love to work, and labs especially love to please. He'll be a great dog whether or not he ever plays catch. (If he chooses not to, think of all the slobbery balls you'll never have to touch.)

p.s. if your dog ends up a chewer instead of a fetcher, beware of tennis balls. They are made to withstand punishment on pavement - they're made of silicon - and they will wear down your dogs teeth. If you ever see a flat-toothed staffy hanging about Bellingham, Washington, that's my boy.

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Funny, my enormous standard poodle, being the clown of the dog breed family, will run after a thrown ball and he's suddenly in the circus...parading about, tossing the ball loosely up and catching it, circling so all the adoring audience can see him. It's gotten so hilarious that we just let him entertain...I no longer try to get him to return the ball to my upturned hand. So much for a retriever, which the standard poodle originally was...too much Ringling Brothers in them, now!

My miniature poodle does that too - throws the ball in the air, kicks it with her legs and pounces around after it. It's so cute to watch her entertain herself (and us!) :lol:


wheat free & yeast free since may '06

also lactose intolerant

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Dogs seem to have different personalities just like people have diffferent personalities. One of our dogs (Lab mix) will only fetch rocks. He'll fetch a rock 5 feet under water, but won't give the time of day to a stick or tennis ball. Our other dog loves to fetch a tennis ball, but he didn't bring the ball back till he was about a year old.

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