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Connie R-E

All Rice Flour Mix

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I've got a loaf of bread in the oven as I type this. I used the flour mix for all rice mix for the rice flour and used the ratio of potato starch and tapioca flour that I ususlly use. I can't wait to slice it and see how it tastes. If this improves on my old recipe by removing that bit of grit from the rice flour, that will be wonderful!!!

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Sigh, the bread did not turn out. I think there was too much fine flour since the other rice flours are powdery as is potato starch and tapicoa flour.

I whipped up another loaf using a 2 to 1 ratio. 2 cups of my regular rice, potato, tapioca blend and on of the all rice blend. It's in the oven now. It rose nicely. The other over flowed the pan and sunk in the center.

I think the all rice would be great for cake and plan to try it next time I bake one.

Will keep all posted.

Also, I'm betting this rice mix and tapioca flour 1 to 1 would make good, chewy bagles. Gonna try that one too.

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That loaf turned out better, though I let it rise too long, about 40 minutes when it should have been 15. sigh

I usually have a bit left over and made bagles. not bad, but will post with a new recipe so more will have the chance to see it and maybe try it themselves. There is a bagel post out there too so.....

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I've tried a few different combinations as well and they didn't turn out either! :P

So, for the best results use a 1:1:1 ratio=1 part American rice flour, 1 part Asian rice flour, 1 part Glutenous rice flour. And, just use this mix for all the flour....

It's worth trying to find the flours, really!! :D

Connie

gluten-free since 1-'98

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Connie,

That last loaf did turn out, just rose too long. The texture is good. The reason I'm combining flours is to try to eliminate the gritty texture of the rice flour in my sweet rice bread recipe. This is the one my boys enjoy the most for sandwiches. The grit makes the bread crumble after a two days. I will keep experimenting. Today I plan to make a loaf and this time let it rise for the correct amount of time!

:)

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Hi Monica,

I created this blend "to try to eliminate the gritty texture of the rice flour"! I hated that texture, too! :P

The American rice flour is such a large grind it makes foods gritty, but when you combine the other 2 Asian rice flours (fine and very fine) with it, in a 1:1:1 ratio, there is no gritty feel. And, no need for xanthan gum. Give it a try without the potato and other flours--you'll like it! B)

Connie

gluten-free since 1-'98

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I tried making the Toll House cookies tonight, but they were quite crumbly and I'm sure they'll turn hard. I did use sweet rice flour instead of glutenous asian flour because I thought I read somewhere that those were the same things. Maybe they are not. I couldn't find the glutenous rice flour anywhere, though.

Also, when making gluten-free cookies, do you find you have to smash the cookie balls down? I rolled the dough in balls and placed them on cookie trays before cooking but they don't spread out like normal cookies. This happened with a batch of gluten-free snickerdoodles from the Incredible Edible gluten-free cookbook (and they were hard, dry and crumbly too.) I'm going smash the cookies and use them for a fruit crumble instead, but we wanted some gluten-free cookies!

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Yes, I mash them--just a bit! :)

I made a giant Toll House Cookie for a B-day party this week. I used a rolling pin to mash that one! It baked well, didn't crumble, and was yummy! The kids loved it!

Warm cookies will crumble to the touch. If you want your cookies less hard/crunchy, try putting them in a sealed container until they soften up. --or dunk'em! B)

Try printing out (or copying) the words on this bag next time you hunt for glutenous rice flour, maybe it will help with the language barrier: http://www.asiafoods.com/asi/showdetl.cfm?...ct_ID=280&DID=7

It is the right stuff...

Try these:

Fast Easy Cookies!

3 c. rice flour

1 tsp. baking soda

1 tsp. cinnamon

1/4 tsp. salt

Mix together in small bowl.

2 sticks butter (1 cup)--softened

1 1/2 c. brown sugar

1 large egg

1 tsp. vanilla

*may need just a drop or two of milk to get all the flour to "dough-up"

Mix together in large bowl.

Preheat oven to 275 F. and use un-greased cookie sheets.

Combine small bowl of dry ingredients into large bowl of wet ingredients. Mix well. Roll into small balls. Place on cookie sheet. Mash down just a bit. Bake for 8-10 min. on aluminum foil to keep them from burning. *Bake just a couple first to be sure the oven is cooking them right. ;)

Enjoy!!

Connie

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Ok Connie,

Lets see if I have this right.....use slightly more of the rice flour mix.....temperature down a bit.....and the mix will be stiffer than usual....right?

I am going in search of the needed rice flours today, as I have been trying to find an EASY way to make my regular Christmas cookies and pies. I did get some Quinoa Flour, which I haven't used yet. I have read that it can be used as a straight substitute for regular flour.....has anyone tried this? I am going to try half a batch of something in a couple of minutes, and I will let you know how it comes out.

Bobbi

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OK

The Quinoa Flour works perfect, I used it in the exact measurement of regular flour and same baking times etc....and the chocolate chip cookies turned out perfect. They didn't flatten out like they do with regular flour, but that might have been because I used to much baking soda. There is no after taste, they are not dry, they hold together well ( no crumbling) and even my kids couldn't tell the difference. You can use this stuff and not even have to explain that your dish is gluten-free.

I will let you know how this goes with other recipes and I am still going to try the rice flour mix.

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:P Don't worry about the term! As long as it is rice gluten you will be fine.

Besides, if you've ever eaten rice, you've eaten some rice gluten already. ;)

Connie

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Hi Connie and others,

I am new here and have been following this thread on the 3 flours. I was diagnosed with gluten intolerance about 1 1/2 years ago. Been eating gluten-free ever since. I have accidently eaten some gluten a few times, I think, but I am very strict and don't ever do it on purpose. I have been looking for the 3 flours and have had a hard time finding them, but today, BINGO, I found at least 1 of them at an Asian market. It was the 3rd Asian market I had been too. They had a 1 lb bag of Glutinous flour (written On the bag) made by Erawan Marketing Co. The other 1 lb bag said only "Rice Flour" made by the same co. It also is from Erawan Marketing Co so I bought it and am calling it the "Fine flour" (looks fine). So now I need the course flour. You said Bob's Red mill would be good. I looked on the web site for BRM and found 3 rice flours. Can you be more specific about that flour? Maybe find a name? I can't wait to see if this works for me!! I am tired of paying such high prices for mixes.

Enjoying this forum!

Del

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Hi Connie and others,

I am new here and have been following this thread on the 3 flours. I was diagnosed with gluten intolerance about 1 1/2 years ago. Been eating gluten-free ever since. I have accidently eaten some gluten a few times, I think, but I am very strict and don't ever do it on purpose. I have been looking for the 3 flours and have had a hard time finding them, but today, BINGO, I found at least 1 of them at an Asian market. It was the 3rd Asian market I had been too. They had a 1 lb bag of Glutinous flour (written On the bag) made by Erawan Marketing Co. The other 1 lb bag said only "Rice Flour". It also is from Erawan Marketing Co so I bought it and am calling it the "Fine flour" (looks fine). So now I need the course flour. You said Bob's Red mill would be good. I looked on the web site for BRM and found 3 rice flours. Can you be more specific about that flour? Maybe find a name? I can't wait to see if this works for me!! I am tired of paying such high prices for mixes.

Enjoying this forum!

Del

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Hi Del,

http://www.bobsredmill.com/catalog/index.p...&product_ID=417

This is the BRM white rice flour (I wish there was a picture of the bag!)

http://www.arrowheadmills.com/products/pro...cat_name=flours

This one is just as good as Bob's--and there is a picture!

I use either and both.

The bag you found that was just labled "Rice Four" at the Asian store is the right one. So is the "Glutenous Rice Four". Good shopping! ;)

Mix in equal amounts and bake!

Connie

gluten-free since 1-'98

~doesn't like high prices either!

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Thanks Connie~ I think I can find that one okay. Are you still having good luck with the 3 flours? What are some other things you have made done with them? Have you made corn bread? Have you ever used corn starch in place of flour?

Sorry for so many questions. I am also sorry for the double posts. I tried to delete the 2nd one but could not see how I could do that.

Del

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Does anyone use this mixture to make biscuits?I would really love some good biscuits.They are so much a staple of breakfast.If anyone has any good recipes using this please post.Or do you just substitute this for equal amounts of wheat flour?

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I make biscuts all the time! (sometimes twice in a day!) :D

Connie's All Rice Biscuts

3 cups All Rice flour blend

5 level Tablespoons Baking powder

1 teasp salt

1/2 stick butter

milk--just enough to make the dough right...

(1/8 teasp chili powder

1/4 teasp mustard powder

1 teasp garlic powder

All for flavor and can be omitted in a pinch)

In your lage mixing bowl, add all dry ingredients and mix well.

Cut in butter until it is well blended with the flour.

Now, add milk --about a 1/4 cup, mix, add 1/4 c.(or less) Is it dry? Add more milk. Very important! You want your dough to be just like new Playdough... It's best to add just a bit too much milk, mix it well, and then "fix" it with more flour--that's my perfered method. (Otherwise it just doesn't taste best...)

Now, you need to have a small square pan, greased. Divide the dough into 16 balls (keep halfing them). Bake at 350F for 20-25 min. They should brown nicely, fluff up, and be done in the middle.

You can also grate up 1/2 lb. of sharp cheddar cheese, and mix it in last, then make sticks instead of balls. Yummy cheese stix!!

Enjoy!

Connie

Ps. I make everything with this mix!! I don't use anything else--don't need to!! :lol:

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I tried making the Toll House cookies tonight, but they were quite crumbly and I'm sure they'll turn hard... they don't spread out like normal cookies.

That happened to me with the gluten-free Mock Toll House Cookies recipe from the gluten-free Gourmet Makes Dessert cookbook by Bette Hagman ~and they were hard, dry, flat as a pancake (didn't rise), and crumbly too. I ended up using them crumbled as a Sundae topping. I tinkered with the recipe a little bit (increasing the flour a little bit and adding Baking powder). And now, not only do they look like the normal chocolate chip cookies, but my husband who is NOT a Celiac, loves them....

Mock Toll House Cookies

2 cups Featherlite mix

1/2 cup Sorghum flour

1/2 teaspoon xanthan gum

1/2 cup (1 stick) margarine

1/2 cup butter flavor Crisco

3/4 cup white sugar

3/4 cup brown sugar

1 teaspoon baking soda

1 teaspoon baking powder

1 scant teaspoon salt

1 teaspoon vanilla

2 eggs

1 12oz. package semisweet choc. chips

1 cup chopped walnuts or pecans (optional)

Preheat oven to 375 degrees. Have ready, but do not grease, 2 cookie sheets.

In a medium bowl, blend the flour mix, sorghum flour, and xanthan gum. Set aside.

In the bowl of your mixer, cream the margarine, Crisco, and both sugars. Add the baking soda, salt, and vanilla. Beat in the eggs, one at a time. Add the dry ingredients and beat well. Stir in the chocolate chips and nuts.

Spoon the dough onto the cookie sheets, using approximately 1 1/2 teaspoons at a time, spacing the cookies 3 inches apart. Bake 7-9 minutes for soft cookies, 9-11 minutes for firm ones. Cool slightly before removing from the sheets.

Makes 5 1/2 dozen cookies.

Nutrients per cookie: Calories 100, Fat 5g, Cholesterol 5mg, Sodium 70mg, Carbohydrates 12g, Protein 1g.

For 9 cups Featherlite mix:

Rice flour (1 part) - 3 cups

Tapioca flour (1 part) - 3 cups

Cornstarch (1 part) - 3 cups

Potato flour* (1 teaspoon per cup) - 3 tablespoons

(* this is potato flour, not potato starch)

Hope everyone enjoys these as much as I do. And Connie, I'm definitely going to try your flour mixture! Thanks for posting it! :D

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I use pretty much that same recipe and get great results. Try all brown sugar, replacing the white sugar for brown in the recipe, if you like a soft cookie that stays soft for days.

BTW, has any one used Twin Vally Mills sorghum flour? I was asked to try some and ordered 25 lbs. The protine is +11 grams and 4.4 of fiber. The texture is smooth, not as gritty as Bob's Red Mill.

Monica

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Deby, I don't know about that particular sorghum flour, but I wanted to let you know that I found some at an Indian grocery (Indian as in India, not Native American). It was called "Jowar Flour", but most importantly was only about $2 for a two pound bag.

I've also used the rice flour mix everyone is talking about in this thread; it is definitely cheaper and miraculously not gritty. But, things don'tn brown quite as quickly, and you do have to flatten the cookies out! I haven't tried yeast bread yet, but I am planning to do so soon.

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Has anyone been successfull making plain white bread with the 3 rice flour combination? After so many failures, I'm discouraged to try again. Did make a good chocolate cake - just like the real thing - using the 3 rice flour combo. Would love to hear from anyone who makes a good plain white bread (grandson doesn't like the taste of the bean, sorgham, etc. flour. Thanks!

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I'm discouraged with plain rice bread too; the loaves are just too heavy, crummy and don't taste good. The last one I made went to the dog :( For loaves I get the best results if I make banana or carrot bread. For everyday bread I make my own waffles. I use them for sandwiches and that works well and don't fall apart. :P

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For loaves I get the best results if I make banana or carrot bread.

Mopsi, Would you share your recipe for carrot bread? I'd like to try it. Granny

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