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mythreesuns

Enterolab Results Are In!

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I sent them my stool and tissue samples exactly two weeks ago, and they just posted my results on their website. VERY impressed with their speed!

Anyway, this is what it says:

Fecal Antigliadin IgA 14

Fecal Antitissue Transglutaminase IgA 10

Quantitative Microscopic Fecal Fat Score 100

Fecal Anti Saccharomyces cerevisiae IgA 7

Fecal Anti Ovalbumin IgA antibody 10

Fecal Anti Soy IgA 11

HLA-DQB1, Allele 1 0201

HLA-DQB1, Allele 2 0501

Serologic equivalent HLA DQ 2,1 (Subtype 2,5)

And the analysis:

I am gluten, egg, and soy intolerant.

I have no signs of malabsorption (was gluten free for 6 wks prior to sample).

I have one celiac gene and one gluten-sensitivity gene. ALL of my kids will have at least one of these genes.

VINDICATION!!!!!!!!!! lol B)


Toni

Casein free since June 2006.

Gluten free since August 2006

Egg and Soy free since October 2006.

Diagnosis of IBS May 2006.

Diagnosis of Fibromyalgia September 2006.

Negative biopsy and blood tests.

EnterLab results:

Gluten intolerance

Egg intolerance

Soy intolerance

HLA-DQ 2,1 (Subtype 2,5) which means I have one celiac gene and one sensitivity gene.

Mother of three special boys. (and not just because of their dx's)

Married 13 years to a guy who wishes we weren't all so "special!"

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Toni,

That is great news! I know you have been searching for answers and hopefully this will be your answer, or lead you on your journey!

Congratulations...let us know if we can help. I have multiple (and, still unknown, intolerances), and have found lots of good foods ... that I can now not eat. Let me know if you need some suggestions. PM if you need anything!

YAY!

Laura

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Congratulations...let us know if we can help. I have multiple (and, still unknown, intolerances), and have found lots of good foods ... that I can now not eat.

Thanks so much!

I don't plan on being too militant about the eggs. I was eating 1-2 eggs a day at the time of the test, so I don't think the eggs will be much of a factor as long as I don't eat them all the time anymore. Is that true or are they just like milk and gluten?

I've already cut out soy milk and products made mainly out of soy because I already suspected soy contributed to my continuing diarrhea. Do you think that's enough, or do I need to eliminate "hidden" soy like I did gluten?


Toni

Casein free since June 2006.

Gluten free since August 2006

Egg and Soy free since October 2006.

Diagnosis of IBS May 2006.

Diagnosis of Fibromyalgia September 2006.

Negative biopsy and blood tests.

EnterLab results:

Gluten intolerance

Egg intolerance

Soy intolerance

HLA-DQ 2,1 (Subtype 2,5) which means I have one celiac gene and one sensitivity gene.

Mother of three special boys. (and not just because of their dx's)

Married 13 years to a guy who wishes we weren't all so "special!"

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You need to get to a safe base. Complete cut out everything your haveing issues with, give that time so that you KNWO what healthy feels like, then you can try a little of ONE thing and see how that goes. Over itme you will figure out the right blance for you.


- Vincent -

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Toni,

That is really a personal decision. I wish I had a better answer. My first thought is, even if you aren't having a reaction, you technically don't know what is happening to your body.

On the other hand, there are other approaches:

Take out ALL soy, eggs, casein, gluten (and any other known allergens). Yes, even the little tiny ones. See how you feel. Then, you can always add things back in and see what happens. But, that brings me back to my first point.

For me, personally....

I needed to get better. I was sick and tired of my health slowly fading away. Now, I haven't found all the answers, but for me, if I know that eating these things are not good for me, then I shouldn't. I am extremely extremely careful. I have no one to blame but myself if I eat a little bit of soy or a few eggs and then get sick. To me, its not worth it. But, that is my personal opinion, based on my symptoms, my health, my outlook.

Plus, you might have other food intolerances. Dr. Fine's test doesn't cover the whole gamut, yet....

Hope this gives you something to think about.

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Toni, you're having fibromyalgia symptoms, including joint pain. Eggs cause terrible joint pain for me, more so than gastrointestinal problems. Now, I think that maybe it's the egg WHITES that are the biggest problem, not the yolk. So, it is possible you might be able to have egg yolk again some time, who knows.

After eliminating eggs, soy and gluten completely from your diet (and yes, even hidden sources) for at least six months, you can try an egg one day, to see what happens. I did that, and I realized they were a huge problem. Since your Enterolab result is very clear on the eggs, you may never be able to have them again. The same goes for soy and gluten.

So, face the facts, be angry about the eggs for a few days if you must :ph34r: , and get on with your life. I hope that you will feel better soon, and I'm very glad that you were proven right by Enterolab, that must feel good.


I am a German citizen, married to a Canadian 29 years, four daughters, one son, seven granddaughters and four grandsons, with one more grandchild on the way in July 2009.

Intolerant to all lectins (including gluten), nightshades (potatoes, tomatoes, peppers, eggplant) and salicylates.

Asperger Syndrome, Tourette Syndrome, Addison's disease (adrenal insufficiency), hypothyroidism, fatigue syndrome, asthma

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

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Toni,

You need to be gluten free for life, obviously. Personally, I would be soy free for life, since it damages the intestines also.

My allergy doctor I see believes in getting the body to forget the intolerance. You would need to cut out all traces of whatever you need to eliminate for at least 2 weeks....I suggest 2-6 months. Then add one food item per week to see if you have a reaction. You will need to remove all traces of eggs to try to get your body to forget them. The same would go for soy, all traces for that time period than you may not need to worry about soy oil, soy lecithin. I personally am not going to eat anything soy again, but that is your own decision to make.

What about dairy, wasn't that included?


Andrea

Enterolab positive results only June 06:
Me HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 1 0201; HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 2 0301; Serologic equivalent: HLA-DQ 2,3 (subtype 2, 7)
Husband HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 1 0201; HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 2 0302; Serologic equivalent: HLA-DQ 2,3 (subtype 2,8)



The whole family has been soy free since February, gluten free since June 2006.

The whole family went back to a gluten diet October 2011.  We never had official testing done and I decided to give gluten a go again.  At this point I've decided to work on making some gluten free things again, though healthwise everyone seems to be fine.  The decision to add gluten back in was also made based on other things I'd read about the 2nd sequence of genes.  It is my belief that we had a gluten intolerance, but thanks to things I've learned here, I know more what to keep an eye on.  If you have a confirmed case of celiac, please don't go back to gluten, it's a lifelong lifestyle change.

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I think you'd do better to cut out all you're intolerant to for a couple months. When you're feeling better, add them back in. I've cut out corn and soy even though I wasn't tested for them just because I know a lot of people have trouble with them. It seemed that my number of intolerances was increasing. But once I get this leaky gut healed, I plan on adding back soy and corn, on a rotation basis. I think a very basic diet really aids in healing faster.


gluten-free 12/05

diagnosed with Lyme Disease 12/06

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Oh, all right! [pouting] <_<

Obviously, you guys are right, so I'll try to cut out EVERYTHING for a while and see what happens.

As for the casein, I knew on my own I was intolerant to that. The test wasn't included in my EnteroLab panel, because I just ordered the stool tests and the egg/yeast/soy test, and they included the gene swabs by mistake. I paid for that separately because I decided that I wanted the gene test after all.

So, because I didn't buy the whole shebang at once I didn't get the milk test thrown in for free.

Ey, yiy, yiy, soy is in everything that gluten isn't! LOL Maybe I'll stick to whole foods for a while. :blink:


Toni

Casein free since June 2006.

Gluten free since August 2006

Egg and Soy free since October 2006.

Diagnosis of IBS May 2006.

Diagnosis of Fibromyalgia September 2006.

Negative biopsy and blood tests.

EnterLab results:

Gluten intolerance

Egg intolerance

Soy intolerance

HLA-DQ 2,1 (Subtype 2,5) which means I have one celiac gene and one sensitivity gene.

Mother of three special boys. (and not just because of their dx's)

Married 13 years to a guy who wishes we weren't all so "special!"

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Maybe I'll stick to whole foods for a while. :blink:

That's what I'm doing :blink: The good thing is, I'm feeling much, much, much better!!! :D I will always from here on out see processed food differently -- it's an indulgence, not an every day treat!


gluten-free 12/05

diagnosed with Lyme Disease 12/06

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Toni,

Yes. If it doesn't have gluten, it has soy. If it doesn't have soy it has dairy. If it doesn't have dairy it has corn. Those 4 things are in practically everything!


Andrea

Enterolab positive results only June 06:
Me HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 1 0201; HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 2 0301; Serologic equivalent: HLA-DQ 2,3 (subtype 2, 7)
Husband HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 1 0201; HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 2 0302; Serologic equivalent: HLA-DQ 2,3 (subtype 2,8)



The whole family has been soy free since February, gluten free since June 2006.

The whole family went back to a gluten diet October 2011.  We never had official testing done and I decided to give gluten a go again.  At this point I've decided to work on making some gluten free things again, though healthwise everyone seems to be fine.  The decision to add gluten back in was also made based on other things I'd read about the 2nd sequence of genes.  It is my belief that we had a gluten intolerance, but thanks to things I've learned here, I know more what to keep an eye on.  If you have a confirmed case of celiac, please don't go back to gluten, it's a lifelong lifestyle change.

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Ursula--how on earth did I end up with a duplicate post!? LOL


Toni

Casein free since June 2006.

Gluten free since August 2006

Egg and Soy free since October 2006.

Diagnosis of IBS May 2006.

Diagnosis of Fibromyalgia September 2006.

Negative biopsy and blood tests.

EnterLab results:

Gluten intolerance

Egg intolerance

Soy intolerance

HLA-DQ 2,1 (Subtype 2,5) which means I have one celiac gene and one sensitivity gene.

Mother of three special boys. (and not just because of their dx's)

Married 13 years to a guy who wishes we weren't all so "special!"

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Holy cow, Andrea, if that isn't my life......... :D

Laura,

Are eggs in everything too.....probably.


Andrea

Enterolab positive results only June 06:
Me HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 1 0201; HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 2 0301; Serologic equivalent: HLA-DQ 2,3 (subtype 2, 7)
Husband HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 1 0201; HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 2 0302; Serologic equivalent: HLA-DQ 2,3 (subtype 2,8)



The whole family has been soy free since February, gluten free since June 2006.

The whole family went back to a gluten diet October 2011.  We never had official testing done and I decided to give gluten a go again.  At this point I've decided to work on making some gluten free things again, though healthwise everyone seems to be fine.  The decision to add gluten back in was also made based on other things I'd read about the 2nd sequence of genes.  It is my belief that we had a gluten intolerance, but thanks to things I've learned here, I know more what to keep an eye on.  If you have a confirmed case of celiac, please don't go back to gluten, it's a lifelong lifestyle change.

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I am so glad you know at last. I agree with the others that you should knock everything out for at least 6 months. You've gotten some great advice on testing stuff at a later time so I won't duplicate. I know I feel best eating meat, veggies, fruit, nuts without much else but it can be hard to do. With so many of us having to deal with this sort of thing I am so thankful at least we have a place to come and get recipes, support and advice. I hope you get relief from your fibro and the other stuff soon.


Courage does not always roar, sometimes courage is the quiet voice at the end of the day saying

"I will try again tommorrow" (Mary Anne Radmacher)

Diagnosed by Allergist with elimination diet and diagnosis confirmed by GI in 2002

Misdiagnoses for 15 years were IBS-D, ataxia, migraines, anxiety, depression, fibromyalgia, parathesias, arthritis, livedo reticularis, hairloss, premature menopause, osteoporosis, kidney damage, diverticulosis, prediabetes and ulcers, dermatitis herpeformis

All bold resoved or went into remission in time with proper diagnosis of Celiac November 2002

 Gene Test Aug 2007

HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 1 0303

HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 2 0303

Serologic equivalent: HLA-DQ 3,3 (Subtype 9,9)

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