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What Do You Eat When Nothing Sounds Good?

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Guest cassidy

I need to vent. I have been incredibly hungry since I got pregnant. I am constantly eating and nothing fills me up. All the foods that are healthy and I used to like taste so nasty that I can't eat them. I loved sweet potatoes and broccoli and now I couldn't get a bite down if they were my only choices. I used to eat some meat and now it grosses me out so much that I just can't. I can't even sleep through the night because I wake up starving and by the time I have eaten enough food I'm wide awake and there is no going back to sleep. I counted and one night in the middle of the night I ate 700 calories!

I do much better drinking. So, I drink a lot of kefir which has tons of protein and I drink a boost every day. I eat a lot of fruit so I think I'm still getting enough good stuff, I just need more calories. I just don't see how that is possible. I was borderline underweight when I got pregnant but I have already gained some weight, so I don't know why I can't get full.

I want to eat enough for my baby so I've tried not worrying about how healthy something is and just trying to eat and that still doesn't work. I don't even want chocolate. The only things that sound good are Papa John's pizza and a Firehouse sub - not gluten-free substitutes of those items.

So, what do you eat when you are hungry but not in the mood to eat anything? Is there anything that you love that is totally amazing?

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During some of my pregnancies I used to eat lots of Cream of Wheat (I didn't know I was celiac) ... lol

So maybe a gluten-free hot cereal might work for you? I like teff with dates and walnuts.

When I'm hungry I often make Pad Thai - the Thai Kitchen brand is quick and easy- you can add egg, chicken or tofu to it for more protein and it's good with some bean sprouts and fresh lime juice. Yum!

Suzie

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I used to keep a lot of snack-type foods around during pregnancy & breastfeeding. Home made trail mix, almonds, cereals. I, too, couldn't stand eating broccoli (though it is my favourite veggie!) and stuck to bland foods instead (potatoes, potatoes and more potatoes!) I also did okay with cauliflower...it's especially good cooked with carrots and onion, and did well with eating buckwheat kasha with bacon. :) Chocolate (just like coffee) is apparently not great for baby, so keeping it to a minimum can be a good thing. Oh...and I found ice cold water with lemon helps a lot with nausea and food aversions...ginger was another good nausea buster.

Michelle

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Guest nini

I loved smoothies when I was pregnant... still love smoothies...

hmmmm what else... steamed rice with yellow saffron seasoning (I use The Gluten Free Pantry's Saffron Rice Seasoning) just follow directions on container.

banana bread (I use The Gluten Free Pantry's Quick Mix and just kinda made up a recipe...) keep it in the fridge then warm it up by the slice in the microwave... mmmmmmm

when nothing else sounds good and I'm starving I make nachos. LOL!

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This is gluten-free and tastes GREAT. Carnation instant breakfast in the cereal isle of the grocery. It has to be the powder form only (the pre-mixed has gluten). And do NOT get the MALT chocolate. (it's gluten). reg chocolate and all other flavors are okay. Mix 1 pack with 1-cup milk. It's full of vitamins and protien and tastes AWESOME!!!!! If you are dairy free. Try goat milk..... It does not have the intense lactose effects of cow's milk. It tastes a "little" bit different. But you can't even tell in the mix. You can also mix with water, but not as nutritious or good!

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When I was pregnant I drank lemonade and ate salads, everything was coming back up anyways. The only thing I could keep down for any length of time were those things for ten months.Oh and huge bottles of green olives, never liked them till I was pregnant.

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I haven't been pregnant, but I've been in the "nothing sounds good" boat. That's usually when I turn to my own comfort foods -- which are generally breakfast-oriented. Eggs -- I eat soft-boiled eggs with avocado for protein and healthy fat. I don't react to McCann's oatmeal, so I eat that with fruit on top and a little honey. Or, I'll have the fruit with yogurt -- frozen blueberries are my fallback fruit when I'm really in a bind because I've always got some in the freezer. Potatoes are good for me and I prefer them shredded in some way -- so I'll make homemade hash browns or have some tater tots (Cascadian or another of the no-additive brands -- I react to the Ore Ida).

I'll also do nuts and dried fruit for snacks and I can pretty much always get down an almond or peanut-butter sandwich on KinnickKinnick flax and sunflower seed bread. Avocados, again -- with cashews and a little red-wine vinegar and good olive oil, salt and pepper.

For vegetables, I tend to do a lot of spinach salads (if spinach is around) and I'll force myself to get through carrots because I need the vitamins -- usually it helps to have some hummus -- I'll do red pepper strips with hummus as well.

I don't like to do a lot of processed corn-syrup-type stuff, but I'd totally lost my appetite a few months back and really had a tough time keeping weight on so I was drinking Boost plus chocolate drink -- watch out for the chocolate malt flavor which isn't gluten-free

The eggs, however, are seriously my fallback! I don't know what I'd do without them!

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I need to vent. I have been incredibly hungry since I got pregnant. I am constantly eating and nothing fills me up. All the foods that are healthy and I used to like taste so nasty that I can't eat them. I loved sweet potatoes and broccoli and now I couldn't get a bite down if they were my only choices. I used to eat some meat and now it grosses me out so much that I just can't. I can't even sleep through the night because I wake up starving and by the time I have eaten enough food I'm wide awake and there is no going back to sleep. I counted and one night in the middle of the night I ate 700 calories!

I do much better drinking. So, I drink a lot of kefir which has tons of protein and I drink a boost every day. I eat a lot of fruit so I think I'm still getting enough good stuff, I just need more calories. I just don't see how that is possible. I was borderline underweight when I got pregnant but I have already gained some weight, so I don't know why I can't get full.

I want to eat enough for my baby so I've tried not worrying about how healthy something is and just trying to eat and that still doesn't work. I don't even want chocolate. The only things that sound good are Papa John's pizza and a Firehouse sub - not gluten-free substitutes of those items.

So, what do you eat when you are hungry but not in the mood to eat anything? Is there anything that you love that is totally amazing?

I hear ya, my youngest is now 8 months old so trust me, i've been there a couple times now! With my second/last all i ate was pretzels and lemonade. I'm sure your tired of gluten-free pretzels by now. As crazy as it sounds, you almost have to think about what REALLY sounds good to you right now, and i know how hard that can be. In a couple of months it will get better. Try snacking on those pretzels and other things until you get past this "stomach always hungry and cramping phase". Another thing would be to walk around the grocery store looking at everything...it might help you think of a new idea, or also try looking at different gluten-free recipes online. Hope this helps some :)

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I loved smoothies when I was pregnant... still love smoothies...

hmmmm what else... steamed rice with yellow saffron seasoning (I use The Gluten Free Pantry's Saffron Rice Seasoning) just follow directions on container.

banana bread (I use The Gluten Free Pantry's Quick Mix and just kinda made up a recipe...) keep it in the fridge then warm it up by the slice in the microwave... mmmmmmm

when nothing else sounds good and I'm starving I make nachos. LOL!

I'd second the vote for smoothies... I found it easier to drink things when pregnant instead of trying to eat food.

I also had trouble eating broccoli, and normally I love it.

I often made banana smoothies when pregnant and the early stages of breastfeeding:

1 1/2 cups pineapple juice (or 1 cup pineapple and ~1/2 cup orange juice)

1 or 2 bananas

juice from 1/2 lemon (or add 1/2 a peeled lemon to the blender)

~6 ice cubes

Extras:

grind ~1 Tbl of Lame Advertisement or flax seeds before adding other ingredients to blender

1 or 2 scoops of gluten-free vanilla ice cream

peeled, cored apple

other fruit or berries (eg strawberries)

I'd drink a whole blender full of this stuff when pregnant, sometimes dh would have some with me too. It would help boost my energy level. Now I have 3 kids, so I always have to share when I mix-up a batch of smoothies :) .

Extras:

grind ~1 Tbl of Lame Advertisement or flax seeds before adding other ingredients to blender

Are we not allowed to post info about certain products? The above post was a suggestion to add a grain called _s_a_l_b_a_

Anyone know why the post says "lame advertisement" instead of what I had originally typed?

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Suzie,

I am new to all this celiac stuff and I had a question abut getting pregnant. I was wondering about how long would have to be eating gluten free foods before I can attempt to get pregnant? My sister and I both want a child and she is more celiac then I am but I was wondering also if I would have to eat all gluten free foods or what? My sister told me I would have to eat the gluten free foods for at least 6 months to a year. Was she right?

I am going to write down your recipe and try it.

Please give me a response on those questions.

Motherhen

I'd second the vote for smoothies... I found it easier to drink things when pregnant instead of trying to eat food.

I also had trouble eating broccoli, and normally I love it.

I often made banana smoothies when pregnant and the early stages of breastfeeding:

1 1/2 cups pineapple juice (or 1 cup pineapple and ~1/2 cup orange juice)

1 or 2 bananas

juice from 1/2 lemon (or add 1/2 a peeled lemon to the blender)

~6 ice cubes

Extras:

grind ~1 Tbl of Lame Advertisement or flax seeds before adding other ingredients to blender

1 or 2 scoops of gluten-free vanilla ice cream

peeled, cored apple

other fruit or berries (eg strawberries)

I'd drink a whole blender full of this stuff when pregnant, sometimes dh would have some with me too. It would help boost my energy level. Now I have 3 kids, so I always have to share when I mix-up a batch of smoothies :) .

Are we not allowed to post info about certain products? The above post was a suggestion to add a grain called _s_a_l_b_a_

Anyone know why the post says "lame advertisement" instead of what I had originally typed?

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Suzie,

I am new to all this celiac stuff and I had a question abut getting pregnant. I was wondering about how long would have to be eating gluten free foods before I can attempt to get pregnant? My sister and I both want a child and she is more celiac then I am but I was wondering also if I would have to eat all gluten free foods or what? My sister told me I would have to eat the gluten free foods for at least 6 months to a year. Was she right?

I am going to write down your recipe and try it.

Please give me a response on those questions.

Motherhen

You may find you'll get more response to your questions if you start a new thread about this topic. :)

What do you mean that your sister is "more celiac" than you. Have you tested positive for celiac? If you are positive then, yes, all your foods have to be gluten-free. I don't know if you need to be gluten free for any specific length of time before attempting a pregnancy. If you can get pregnant sooner than later then that's great...just make sure you continue to be completely gluten-free during and after your pregnancy.

Michelle

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I got pregnant only 4 months after going gluten free, so the 6 months doesn't account for individual differences very well...

Suzie,

I am new to all this celiac stuff and I had a question abut getting pregnant. I was wondering about how long would have to be eating gluten free foods before I can attempt to get pregnant? My sister and I both want a child and she is more celiac then I am but I was wondering also if I would have to eat all gluten free foods or what? My sister told me I would have to eat the gluten free foods for at least 6 months to a year. Was she right?

I am going to write down your recipe and try it.

Please give me a response on those questions.

Motherhen

I'm going through that now and find that yogurt is usually non-offensive to me. I also have been drinking a chocolate nutritional supplement that Kroger stores make (like Ensure) - it says gluten-free right on the label. It does have a fair amount of sugar in it, but lots of vitamins and will do in a pinch when nothing else sounds good.

I need to vent. I have been incredibly hungry since I got pregnant. I am constantly eating and nothing fills me up. All the foods that are healthy and I used to like taste so nasty that I can't eat them. I loved sweet potatoes and broccoli and now I couldn't get a bite down if they were my only choices. I used to eat some meat and now it grosses me out so much that I just can't. I can't even sleep through the night because I wake up starving and by the time I have eaten enough food I'm wide awake and there is no going back to sleep. I counted and one night in the middle of the night I ate 700 calories!

I do much better drinking. So, I drink a lot of kefir which has tons of protein and I drink a boost every day. I eat a lot of fruit so I think I'm still getting enough good stuff, I just need more calories. I just don't see how that is possible. I was borderline underweight when I got pregnant but I have already gained some weight, so I don't know why I can't get full.

I want to eat enough for my baby so I've tried not worrying about how healthy something is and just trying to eat and that still doesn't work. I don't even want chocolate. The only things that sound good are Papa John's pizza and a Firehouse sub - not gluten-free substitutes of those items.

So, what do you eat when you are hungry but not in the mood to eat anything? Is there anything that you love that is totally amazing?

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Suzie,

I am new to all this celiac stuff and I had a question abut getting pregnant. I was wondering about how long would have to be eating gluten free foods before I can attempt to get pregnant? My sister and I both want a child and she is more celiac then I am but I was wondering also if I would have to eat all gluten free foods or what? My sister told me I would have to eat the gluten free foods for at least 6 months to a year. Was she right?

I am going to write down your recipe and try it.

Please give me a response on those questions.

Motherhen

Hi Motherhen,

Michelle had a good suggestion... if you start a new thread with your question you'll probably get lots of feedback.

I don't know what you've been told or why? If you are celiac, you'll need to eat a completely gluten-free diet for life.

Have you been unable to get pregnant so far? Celiac disease can affect the reproductive system and result in infertility in some people. But it doesn't affect everyone the same way.

I've just recently found out that I'm celiac- I have 3 children and was fortunate to get pregnant right away each time we decided to have a new child, even though I had untreated celiac disease.

You're lucky that you know you're celiac- you'll be able to treat your disease. Some people find that they get very ill during pregnancy or post-partum if they are not diagnosed.

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banana bread (I use The Gluten Free Pantry's Quick Mix and just kinda made up a recipe...) keep it in the fridge then warm it up by the slice in the microwave... mmmmmmm

Another vote for banana bread.

Cocoa Pebbles :ph34r:

Chips and salsa

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Guest cassidy

I got some Carnation instant breakfast and it was good. It was easier to drink that because eating anything just sounded so bad. I might try smoothies, but what do people put in them? I saw one recipe. Does anyone else have any favorites?

Thank you all for your suggestions.

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I got some Carnation instant breakfast and it was good. It was easier to drink that because eating anything just sounded so bad. I might try smoothies, but what do people put in them? I saw one recipe. Does anyone else have any favorites?

Thank you all for your suggestions.

I put all kinds of fruits in my smoothies. Almost always bananas, but otherwise, varieties of berries, pineapple, mango, papaya... anything. Sometimes I'll add soy yogurt or soy milk, but usually not. Sometimes I'll add coconut milk for fat, and sometimes rice or hemp protein powder.

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Guest nini

smoothie recipes:

Tip: peel bananas and freeze them on a cookie sheet with either parchement paper or wax paper then store in freezer bags, buy big bags of frozen fruit, strawberries, blueberries, peaches

with yogurt add more if desired

my favorite

1-2 cups apple juice

2 frozen bananas

4-6 large frozen strawberries

1/4 cup Vanilla yogurt

2 tbsp. local honey

variation on that one substitute orange juice for apple juice

My daughter's fave

1-2 cups apple juice

1 frozen banana

1/2 cup blueberries

handful of frozen strawberries

1/4 cup Vanilla yogurt

2 tbsp. local honey

Peach smoothie

1-2 cups orange juice

1 cup frozen peaches

1/4 cup Vanilla yogurt

Blueberry/Banana Smoothie

1-2 cups apple juice (tastes funky with orange)

1 frozen banana

1 cup frozen blueberries

2 tbsp. local honey

1/4 cup Vanilla or plain yogurt

you can experiment with just about any liquid you like, for example

Silk Soymilk smoothie

1-2 cups Chocolate or Vanilla Silk Soymilk

handful of walnuts

1 cup frozen raspberries

optional you can add ground flax seeds to any smoothie

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Potatoes...you can cook them so many different ways. I made breakfast potatoes, baked potatoes and homemade potato soup. Speaking of soup, that was another ok food for me. Lastly, like other people mentioned, smoothies. I was very sick during my pregnancy and had trouble holding anything down, food or fluids. One thing they told me in the hospital though that worked was to have things that were slushy or frozen. I have no idea why it works, but it did for me, when almost nothing else worked. Put your drinks in a blender with some ice, and try to add whatever else you can into a smoothie to get extra nutrition and calories. Good luck!

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I could have written this post! I am 11 weeks pregnant and nothing sounds good! I am also casein free too so it makes it even more difficult.

For breakfast I have eggs, juice, bacon, banana, gluten-free cereal and almond milk.

snack, apple and peanut butter

lunch is hard, nothing sounds good. I've been having rice, bush's baked beans and lunch meat.

dinner is hard too. meat and a potato or rice.

When I'm starving I usually have envirokidz koala krisp cereal.

Before bed I usually have peanuts in the shell and a banana or apple sauce. The protein seems to keep me full all night.

I love the idea of adding coconut milk to a smoothie, being CF it's hard to make a good smoothie that will fill me up. I miss dairy :(

Mia H.

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