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rez

Bedwetting?

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Does anyone know anything or have any experience with bed wetting. We know my son is gluten intolerant and don't know if this could have anything to do with my 10 year old daughter wetting the bed. Any ideas? I don't want to jump to any conclusions and rush to put on the diet. She doesn't want anything to do with this diet. Please let me know if anyone has any suggestions. Thanks.

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My son wets the bed, too. He's 10 and not gluten intolerant. You should have her checked to see if there's a health problem causing it -- we did for my son and there was no problem. He's just a bed wetter. He washes his own sheets and clothes and wears a Pull-up to bed every night. None of us stress over it, except when he's too lazy to take his Pull-ups to the trash outside and we all have to smell the urnine in it -- he tends to hide them -- yuck. Bedwetting is normal, but more common in boys.

We tried the alarm you can get ... it didn't help him at all. He's actually very lazy, so I think in his case it was low motivation. I know for a fact that he's woken up dry and just laid there and wet himself ... even if he doesn't have a Pull-up on!!


gluten-free 12/05

diagnosed with Lyme Disease 12/06

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It could be gluten causing it, or other intolerances. It is also possible that she needs to see a chiropractor. I know several people who had bedwetters, and the children stopped bedwetting after being adjusted by a chiropractor.

My oldest daughter would wet her bed (or pee wherever) because she was a sleepwalker and wouldn't wake up.

It would be a good idea to make sure there is no physical problem. And in order to rule out celiac disease, you need to have her tested, too. Since it is genetic, and your son has it, the whole family really needs to be tested.


I am a German citizen, married to a Canadian 29 years, four daughters, one son, seven granddaughters and four grandsons, with one more grandchild on the way in July 2009.

Intolerant to all lectins (including gluten), nightshades (potatoes, tomatoes, peppers, eggplant) and salicylates.

Asperger Syndrome, Tourette Syndrome, Addison's disease (adrenal insufficiency), hypothyroidism, fatigue syndrome, asthma

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My niece wet the bed until she was 15 or so and started taking a hormone thing. Some people's bodies just are really slow at making the chemical that tells your body not to make urine at night. Don't stress over it.


"But then, in all honesty, if scientists don't play god, who will?"

- James Watson

My sources are unreliable, but their information is fascinating.

- Ashleigh Brilliant

Leap, and the net will appear.

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Does anyone know anything or have any experience with bed wetting. We know my son is gluten intolerant and don't know if this could have anything to do with my 10 year old daughter wetting the bed. Any ideas? I don't want to jump to any conclusions and rush to put on the diet. She doesn't want anything to do with this diet. Please let me know if anyone has any suggestions. Thanks.

Bedwetting has many causes.

It can be hidden allergies/intolerances (not necessarily gluten related) which cause her to sleep through the inner "alarm bells" that wake the rest of us up.

It can be caused by emotional trauma. Sexual abuse.

Physical problems. muscle/bladder problems.. multiple things.

I agree with the others, have her physically checked out to rule out certain causes. Since your other child has gluten problems, it might not hurt to have her tested.


V

Severe airborne allergies since childhood. Was on constant antihisamines with behavior issues. Digestion issues started noticably around 1985.

1992 IBS diagnosis.

2004 Corn allergy - through diet discovery.

2005 RAST negative to all food allergies. High cholesterol diagnosed as PCOS.

2006 Immunolabs ELISA and IgE assay:

IgE to Corn, Milk, Eggs, & White Bean.

IgG to peppers, blk/wt pepper, beans, almonds, yeasts.

Neg. to Celiac, gluten, etc. High IgA level.

2008 No longer considered as having PCOS, or associated risks.

Currently avoiding corn, eggs, cow & goat milk, all beans (cept some soy derivatives & peanut oil), cruciferous veggies, onions/garlic, carrots/celery, anything bilberry/cranberry/blueberry, peppers, and anything remotely corn derived, corntaminated.

Currently off all allergy medications for airborne allergies and breathing fine.

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