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peasoup

Cross Contamination Problems

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I've been having a lot of flare ups lately, and the only thing I can think to put it down to is cross contamination. I cook all my own meals so they are all gluten-free, but I live in a student house with five other people so the kitchen certainly isn't. Can gluten still be 'present' in eg saucepans or seives after they've been washed up? Do I need to have my own set of pans which no one else uses, or would it be ok to wash everything up before I use it to make sure it really is clean. I just seem to be suffering continously, I barely get over one bout before I'm hit again and it's really starting to get me down, I need to sort it out.

Thanks

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I would want my own pans, knives, silverware, plates & cups (especially if they are Gladware or some kind of plastic), etc. Just the bare minimum, maybe, but you can't rely on intensils and stuff other people are using...it's too difficult and makes getting sick too easy, staying well too much work.

I would also get myself a small cutting board that no one else EVER touches...plus, a can opener just for myself too.

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Hi peasoup, and welcome :)

From the sound of things, I think that you are probably getting cross contaminated in your kitchen.

Are the pans you're using non-stick? If so, and they have scratches, they could be harboring gluten. If that's the case, I'd suggest you get yourself a small set of stainless steel cookware that can be scoured out and cleaned properly.

You should definately have your own collander, strainer, and toaster. Put your name or something on those so no one else uses them for gluten foods.

Remember that wooden cutting boards and spoons also need to be replaced.

Be careful with the countertop, microwave oven, toaster oven--put down plastic wrap, foil or use a plate to prepare your food. Crumbs are the enemy here :D

Also, are all of your personal care products gluten-free?


Patti

"Life is what happens while you're busy making other plans"

"When people show you who they are, believe them"--Maya Angelou

"Bloom where you are planted"--Bev

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Personal care products that can contain gluten:

mascara, foundation, powder, eye shadow, eyebrow tint, lipstick, lip gloss, toothpaste, mouthwash, flavoured floss, shampoo, bar soap, bodywash, conditioner, hairspray, hair wax, hair gel, hair serum, moisturizer, exfoliator, shaving gel, hair removal creams, lubricant (trust me, you do NOT want to find this one out the hard way. . . ), feminine pads. . . do I need to go on?

Gluten can be inhaled, ingested, or absorbed through skin or mucous membranes. . .this means that anything that goes on, in or near your body should be checked for gluten. If you are absolutely desperate for makeup, most of MAC's cosmetics are grain free (though you do have to check every time you purchase one. . .makeup companies are as prone to changing recipies as anyone else). In shampoos and conditioners, look out for products that advertise themselves as enriched with vitamin E (usually a wheat or oat extract), avoid ingredients like hydrolyzed plant protein, and keep an eye out for triticum vulgaris (the latin name for wheat). Clairol's Herbal Essences shampoos are gluten free (not sure about their conditioners. . .) as are some of John Frieda's products. Ice products used to be gluten free, though I've not checked in a couple of years.

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Guest cassidy

My strainer certainly got me sick. I now have my own pots, pans, colander, and can opener. I would recommend getting some of your own stuff and hopefully that will help.

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Personal care products that can contain gluten:

Gluten can be inhaled, ingested, or absorbed through skin or mucous membranes. . .this means that anything that goes on, in or near your body should be checked for gluten.

I have read that this is not true, that the problem with products is not actually breathing or absorbing through skin, but on touching your mouth or getting dust in your mouth and then swallowing. In practice, it is essentially the same, but slightly less worrying. Flour in the air would still be a problem, but it might mean some flexibility with things that will never come near your hands or mouth or that you can wash off your hands.

Does anyone have sources on this?

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My various doctors (because I live part of the year in Europe and part of the year in Canada, my medical needs are handled by two teams - four docs in Canada and four docs in Europe) are divided (but not by continent) on the question of whether gluten can be absorbed through skin and mucal membranes. . .I think the conclusion they came to was that contact gluten would be a problem if you have DH. . .which I do. We discovered, somewhat by accident, that in my case at least, my body will react in a celiac fashion to absorption of gluten through mucal membranes - mascara with wheat in it will cause a systemic celiac response, as will vaginal lubricants/medications, nasal sprays and dental products. In other circumstances, I have experienced a purely DH reaction to gluten containing products - after making a friend a sandwich with wheat bread, my hands will swell slightly and turn bright red where the bread came in contact. Then again, there is enough wheat protein remaining in the average extra-strength ibuprofen for it to be a problem for me, so it could simply be my heightened sensitivity that is the problem, and it makeups,etc could be fine for you.

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