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norm41

Told Yesterday That In Ny celiac disease Is Tax Deductable

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As far as I know it is for the difference between say a regular loaf of bread and the gluten free bread. You need to keep all receipts and you need to pass the deductible limit for health I think (on itemized deductions form).


Andrea

Enterolab positive results only June 06:
Me HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 1 0201; HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 2 0301; Serologic equivalent: HLA-DQ 2,3 (subtype 2, 7)
Husband HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 1 0201; HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 2 0302; Serologic equivalent: HLA-DQ 2,3 (subtype 2,8)



The whole family has been soy free since February, gluten free since June 2006.

The whole family went back to a gluten diet October 2011.  We never had official testing done and I decided to give gluten a go again.  At this point I've decided to work on making some gluten free things again, though healthwise everyone seems to be fine.  The decision to add gluten back in was also made based on other things I'd read about the 2nd sequence of genes.  It is my belief that we had a gluten intolerance, but thanks to things I've learned here, I know more what to keep an eye on.  If you have a confirmed case of celiac, please don't go back to gluten, it's a lifelong lifestyle change.

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It is possible, in theory, to do so, but there are a number of caveats:

1) you can only deduct the increased price of gluten-free foods, which means you have to keep receipts and deduct the cost of "normal" foods

2) you've got to keep meticulous records and have a doctor's letter on file with the IRS

3) realize that this is a big red flag for the IRS to audit you

4) it may or may not last - many accountants debate how legit it is, as specialty gluten-free foods are not *required* (there are lots of naturally gluten-free foods that we can live off of instead)

5) you have to be itemizing your medical expenses (that is, they must be over 7.5% of your AGI)


Tiffany aka "Have I Mentioned Chocolate Lately?"

Inconclusive Blood Tests, Positive Dietary Results, No Endoscopy

G.F. - September 2003; C.F. - July 2004

Hiker, Yoga Teacher, Engineer, Painter, Be-er of Me

Bellevue, WA

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The "over 7.5% of AGI" makes it impossible for me to deduct anything at all for medical.

But if that isn't a barrier......then

Your Dr. probably has to "prescribe" gluten-free items - probably itemized. Those foods have to be NECESSARY for your health. Probably none are. My accountant told me that it can't really be done because of that. Sugar-Free substitutes are not deductible for diabetics (my husband is diabetic). Same thing: there are plenty of low-glycemic foods that are in a regular diet and no Dr. will "prescribe" substitutes as necessary for health (implied is that there is a detrimental effect to your health if you don't have the specific foods).

Unfortunately for us Celiacs the "removal of a food group" does not constitute medical treatment - it's JUST FOOD!! (but that's the GOOD thing about Celiac- the treatment is non-medical unlike Cancer or heart conditions, or kidney disease).

If I HAD to have a disease, I'd pick Celiac over many other awful diseases, and the heck with the taxman!


Franceen

Diagnosed DH by Allergist via gluten-free Diet Success

Gluten-free since Dec 2005

Gluten-free works so why keep getting tests?

Neg skin biopsy & Neg bloodwork after gluten-free for 3 months

No Endoscopy - need to eat gluten for good test & won't do it

No other Allergies or major ailments!

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It is possible, in theory, to do so, but there are a number of caveats:

1) you can only deduct the increased price of gluten-free foods, which means you have to keep receipts and deduct the cost of "normal" foods

2) you've got to keep meticulous records and have a doctor's letter on file with the IRS

3) realize that this is a big red flag for the IRS to audit you

4) it may or may not last - many accountants debate how legit it is, as specialty gluten-free foods are not *required* (there are lots of naturally gluten-free foods that we can live off of instead)

5) you have to be itemizing your medical expenses (that is, they must be over 7.5% of your AGI)


Bev

Mom of Garrett - Mizzou freshman; diagnosed Jan 2005

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