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Munew

Help With Mixers

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We have a house full of celiacs and I burned out my mom's old mixer trying to make gluten-free bread (Sunbeam 120 Watts). I had heard that a Kitchenaid was the only way to go for gluten-free cooking. When I got on the internet to research there were a lot of complaints about the plastic gear burning out. What do you all think? I read one of the people who had a Kitchenaid went over to a Viking. But I don't want to buy an $$$$$ mixer and burn it out. We have 4 out of 5 on a gluten-free diet and my husband is sick of being the human mixer --especially on high speed.

Thank you,

munew

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The plastic gears on mine broke ... I'd never recommend a Kitchen Aide blender. Get one with metal gears!

I've heard good things about the ones Starbucks uses ... they're obviously sturdy -- they're Vitamix.

Mine right now is just a cheap one ... I figure this way when it breaks it's not the tragedy it was with the Kitchen Aide.

Oh, I do have a Kitchen Aide MIXER, it's the blender that I had trouble with the plastic on. I've had my mixer for years, but I don't use it often.


gluten-free 12/05

diagnosed with Lyme Disease 12/06

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We have a house full of celiacs and I burned out my mom's old mixer trying to make gluten-free bread (Sunbeam 120 Watts). I had heard that a Kitchenaid was the only way to go for gluten-free cooking. When I got on the internet to research there were a lot of complaints about the plastic gear burning out. What do you all think? I read one of the people who had a Kitchenaid went over to a Viking. But I don't want to buy an $$$$$ mixer and burn it out. We have 4 out of 5 on a gluten-free diet and my husband is sick of being the human mixer --especially on high speed.

Thank you,

munew

Hi,

I too went looking for a good mixer for our gluten free baking. We too have a family that eat gluten free, husband, children and 10 grandchildren. When I went to look at the ratings there were different KitchenAid machines, plus lots of others. We had a Bosch years ago and that is what I went looking for. After talking to other gluten free people, including Carol Fenster Kitchen Aid rated the best for our gluten free baking/mixing. I do not think that the rating reports take much gluten free mixing into consideration, that is why I wanted to talk to those like me, that needed it for gluten free items. Mine has metal parts, as far as I know, its the 600 series, which has the largest bowl I could find. I mix many loaves of bread or whatever I am making at a time and that was important to me. Some don't like the fact that the 600 series bowl lifts out instead of the arm lifting up, but I don't mind that because I love every other part of it. It has a bigger motor to handle bigger things and I love it! I have never had gluten free bakery items come out so well as with the KitchenAid 600 series machine. I can't say enough about it. I went looking for the best pricing and surprisingly found it at a local Ace Hardware. He matched the lowest price I had found on line. I use it all the time and wouldn't trade it for any other kind of mixer. I think its probably like anything else, the company must have high end and low end models, some performing and outlasting others. Hope this helps! :) Happy Baking!

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We have a house full of celiacs and I burned out my mom's old mixer trying to make gluten-free bread (Sunbeam 120 Watts). I had heard that a Kitchenaid was the only way to go for gluten-free cooking. When I got on the internet to research there were a lot of complaints about the plastic gear burning out. What do you all think? I read one of the people who had a Kitchenaid went over to a Viking. But I don't want to buy an $$$$$ mixer and burn it out. We have 4 out of 5 on a gluten-free diet and my husband is sick of being the human mixer --especially on high speed.

Thank you,

munew

I have a KitchenAid that I've had for probably 18 years. I've used it for both types of breads (gluten-free and regular), large batches of cookies, potatoes--most everything you could think of. I've never had a problem with it--it runs and looks like the day I bought it. I would recommend it.

Carla--I have a Waring blender--those are the way to go in my opinion. They use them in bars and restaurants, too. Had mine forever. I like to buy quality, and only once! :D


Patti

"Life is what happens while you're busy making other plans"

"When people show you who they are, believe them"--Maya Angelou

"Bloom where you are planted"--Bev

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We have a house full of celiacs and I burned out my mom's old mixer trying to make gluten-free bread (Sunbeam 120 Watts). I had heard that a Kitchenaid was the only way to go for gluten-free cooking. When I got on the internet to research there were a lot of complaints about the plastic gear burning out. What do you all think? I read one of the people who had a Kitchenaid went over to a Viking. But I don't want to buy an $$$$$ mixer and burn it out. We have 4 out of 5 on a gluten-free diet and my husband is sick of being the human mixer --especially on high speed.

Thank you,

munew

It just dawned on me that it is possible that someone that had a KitchenAid Stand Mixer (if one burned out) very well could have used the wrong mixer tool for the motor. I noticed when I got mine that in the book it said certain tools were for certain things. I would assume that it would be too hard on the tool/blade as well as the motor if something was used for something heavy or sticky that was only meant for something light like eggs. I know the wire mixer whip is meant for things like eggs, not sticky or heavy dough. Maybe that is why someone's burned out.

And also, the plastic gears the person mentioned that burned out were on a blender not the stand mixer, there is quite a difference in the machines.

I have never seen anything outdo the KitchenAid and it even gave me more loaves of gluten free bread per batch than my old mixer, that is how well it mixes! I love it!

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Guest nini

my stand mixer is a GE and it's great, it's got dough hooks and regular mixers... the dough hooks are great for mixing the gluten-free breads... For pie crust and biscuits I use my food processor as it's got a much stronger blade.

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