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emi_220

Can You Trust The gluten-free Label?

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I was just diagnosed with celiac disease last week so I'm still learning about and trying to adjust to the gluten- free diet. I went to the store and saw that products say that they are gluten free right on the label and I was just wondering can trust all of these products just from that claim? I read that the US doesn't regulate the labeling of gluten free foods. I assume these companies know what they put in their food and what they don't so maybe this is a stupid question but I just wanted to be sure.

Also, if there's nothing on the label that says gluten free, but none of the ingredients are gluten in any form (even the "hidden"/questionable ones) is it safe to say that it's gluten free? or should you always call the manufacturer to be sure? :unsure:

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If, in the US, the product says that it is gluten fee (roll it over and verify for yourself), it should be gluten free.

If it says "Wheat Free", it will not be required to list barley, rye, malt and oats for some.(other gluten ingredients)

Gluten free labels mean that it should be safe to consume.

In other words:

Gluten free - great

Wheat Free- check for other gluten additives.

Hope this helps


Lisa

Gluten Free - August 15, 2004

"Not all who wander are lost" - JRR Tolkien

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Very tricky,

I trust the mainstream products from the Wegmans which state gluten-free. I never had a problem. They are very good about labeling and if they are not 100% sure they will not put the gluten free circle on it. I always double check the label in the beginning when there is no gluten free listing, I sometimes miss things and have bought a product just to get it home and find malt or something listed. It takes time but once you do it awhile you get into a routine and it is easier to shop then.


~~~~Gluten Free since 9/2004~~~~~~

Friends may come and go but Sillies are Forever!!!!!!!

36_22_10[1].gif

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There are companies that will absolutely list ALL their ingredients. I know that Kraft is one. If you don't find anything containing gluten in their ingredient list, then there isn't any. There are others, but since I am intolerant to so many things that I can't eat any prepared foods anyway, I'll leave listing other products to others.

You may want to check out Nini's newbie kit, it might answer your questions. You'll find it here: Nini's website. Scroll down to the bottom to find the links.


I am a German citizen, married to a Canadian 29 years, four daughters, one son, seven granddaughters and four grandsons, with one more grandchild on the way in July 2009.

Intolerant to all lectins (including gluten), nightshades (potatoes, tomatoes, peppers, eggplant) and salicylates.

Asperger Syndrome, Tourette Syndrome, Addison's disease (adrenal insufficiency), hypothyroidism, fatigue syndrome, asthma

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

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I agree with the above. When buying gluten free, I pretty much stick with the more popular companies, who only make gluten-free food. That way, you can ensure there is no cross contamination. Also, be aware of those foods that should be naturally gluten free (ie. rice cakes), but aren't necessarily free of gluten. Opt for the often more expensive "Gluten Free" ones.

Takes some practice, but eventually it will be second nature.

Best wishes,

Heather : )

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Guest cassidy

I don't trust it when it says gluten-free. I am overly cautious but I just really don't like getting sick. If it says gluten-free and it says which allergens are manufactured there, then I trust it.

I have gotten sick from things like Lay's chips which are on their gluten-free list, but are not produced on dedicated lines. I usually choose just to eat things that are produced in an area free of gluten.

In the beginning it was hard to check everything but now I have the brands that I use and I rarely have to check out any products anymore.

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I agree with Ursula about Kraft...yes I am bias to because my boyfriend works for them...but he explained to me that even if it technically doesn't have gluten in their product if there's the chance of cc they list gluten as an ingredient. which is great because a lot of other companies (not all) just say there is a chance of cc.


Lisa

gluten-free since~November 30, 2006 (yes I know not long)

trying to stay away from milk

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I am new to this too, but I have been reading labels and find even when they say gluten free they will state on the back that their products are manufactured in a plant that processes wheat, milk, etc. At this point I am just staying away from those products. I was at Trader Joes today and they had gluten free waffles, and I was all excited until I read that there could be cc... so I didn't buy them

It looks like that is the general consensus of this board... correct me if I am wrong.

Then I come home and make tuna salad, take a small bite, and think -- oh jeez, I didn't check the Del Monte label of sweet relish -- bad move -- I tossed it, and started over. YIKES :-)

Regarding Kraft, I have read that Miracle Whip is gluten free, but what about the other Kraft Mayo?

And does it apply to the 'Lite' ones too?

Thanks all,

Paranoid -- Cin


Cindy

Gluten Free since November 2006

Lactose Intolerant since 1980

100% Lactose Free since May 2006

Caffeine Free since August 2007

Hashimoto's Disease

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In general I trust the gluten free label, but obviously there are exceptions. I always read labels until I am familiar with a particular brand. The only companies I never read labels for are Great Value, Glutino, Ener-G, and Kinnikinnick. There are also certain "gluten free" items I won't touch, these include Bob's Red Mill and Amy's. I've been glutened way too many times by their supposedly gluten free items. Ugh... Not worth getting sick from. Mostly anymore I stick to fresh meats, veggies, fruits, Kraft products, and home baked goodies using Kinnikinnick flours. I've found this to be the easiest way to do it. If you have a super Wal-mart, I would recommend shopping there. Their Great Value brand labels gluten free and I've never been glutened by any of their products. The Great Value stuff is often better tasting than the brand name stuff and for half the price.


~Angie~

Gluten free since May 2004

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I echo Heather22 and Cassidy. I do not trust "gluten free" at face value. Companies that have dedicated gluten free facilities have always been safe for me, Kinnikinnick, Enjoy Life, and others.

Over the past year (since my diagnosis) I've been sick many times through cross-contamination by several companies that place a gluten-free label on their product but process gluten-containing items in the same facility. As someone said, if they run gluten-free food on the same lines or on lines that are in close proximity to gluten-filled lines then the company may claim an item is "gluten-free" but in my opinion it is not gluten free enough. (My opinion is based not on a whim to be over-the-edge with gluten free, but based on what my body is screaming at me.)

Currently no laws in the U.S. apply to what "gluten free" means. Read the labels and research research research via the internet and by contacting manufacturers. It's really overwhelming at first, but little by little you'll find your way, and before you know it, you're no longer overwhelmed. Nini's Newbie Survival Kit will help you tremendously.

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I do not always trust it. I have gotten sick from corn chips, creme of rice and Turkey. They all said Gluten free but they sure made me sick.

I trust the companies that have a dedicated factory or have a special routine making the stuff kinda.


One Celiac gene and one gluten intolerance gene (HLA-DQ 2,1).

Grain free, casein free, soy/legume free + a bunch of allergies I have had since I was a child (stone fruits, nuts..carrots)

Following the Specific Carbohydrate Diet, but no nuts, legumes or casein.

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