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ravenselene

Vegetarian Nutrition

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As a vegetarian the dietary advice I have been given repeatedly has been terrible. Either I've been told to eat meat which is very offensive or I've been told to fill myself up with processed rubbish food because it's gluten free.

At my last dietician meeting I tried to get some concrete advice on food combining and on the protein requirements for a vegetarian and I was given a formula that told me how much protein was in three slices of meat!

I would like to see some pro active campaigning for better nutritional advice for all Coeliacs or Gluten Free diet followers based on simple, fresh foods. With immune systems that are already impaired loading ourselves up with sugars and refined carbohydrates is not healthy. I would also like to see some excellent and supportive nutritional advice for vegetarians on a Gluten Free diet.

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Guest cassidy

My best sources of protein are kefir, boost, milk and cheese omelettes. I'm not a vegatarian anymore but I really hate meat and I can only choke it down every once in a while. I'm pregnant so it is recommended that I get 80 -100 grams of protein a day. I have turned heavily to dairy but I'm able to meet those requirements every day.

It can be done but I don't know what I would do without dairy.

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Due to my many food allergies and celiac disease I eat a vegan/gluten-free diet. I

so understand the frustration! The dietitian I went to was useless.

I get my protein (and mind you I had to start with

small amounts) from Quinoa, Sunflower/Pumpkin

seeds, Shelled Hemp seeds (I like the Nutiva brand).

I also take a sublingual B-complex to make sure

I get enough of B-12.

There are Rice protein powders available that are

gluten free, too.

I found much of my info by searching

the internet. There should be a site or 2 that can

help you with your specific intake requirements,

though I don't know any off the top of my head.

Hope this helps some.


alicia

been gluten-free 4 yrs.

too many food allergies to list!

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Due to my many food allergies and celiac disease I eat a vegan/gluten-free diet. I

so understand the frustration! The dietitian I went to was useless.

Hi Alicia,

Thank you for that, I don't use quinoa as much as I should-my boyfriend hates it, says its like eating ants eggs! I love seeds though.

I'm writing a book for vegetarian gluten free folk like us, would you be interested in contributing? means answering around 12 questions about previous health, good advoce, bad advice etc and it woulld feature in my book alongside around 8 others...

If you would be interested I'd be thrilled to email you the questions.

My email is darklightsnapshot@yahoo.co.uk

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My 8 year old daughter is a gluten, casein, and soy free vegetarian. The rest of us are gluten and casein free but eat meat. My life would be so much easier if she would eat meat! :) My search of the internet said that if she is eating enough calories without eating a lot of junk, she will get enough protein. That rice has enough protein if you eat enough of it. I am hoping that is true. Luckily, she will eat plenty of fruits and vegetables. For breakfast, she usually eats eggs and grits. For lunch and/or dinner, I try to cook different vegetables together, add some beans, and some rice or pasta or corn. Sometimes, she will eat a Sunshine burger or some vegan tamales that I buy at Whole Foods. For snacks, she will sometimes have nuts or crackers with cashew butter or carrots and hummus. There isn't much variety in her diet but she seems happy enough with her food and she seems healthy.


Karen

gluten free 4/06

casein free 7/06

DQ1, DQ8

Daughter (11) gluten free 5/06, casein free 6/06

Daughter (9) gluten free 3/06, casein free 7/06, soy free, trying peanut free

vegetarian

gluten lite on and off since 1999

All dx'ed by Enterolab

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mmm... coconut milk

lentils

black bean tacos (corn tortillas, and vegies as desired)

Amy's brand has vegetarian and gluten free options including a great chili (make sure it is labeled "gluten free" as there are different versions and some cans are processed on equipment that processes wheat)

Trader Joes has some vegetarian and gluten free Indian pre-packaged meals


Gluten-Free since February 2006

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It's tough... the world isn't ready to deal with food restrictions in so many ways. Being in CA and WA, I've see a lot of accomodation, but less so when I've been on travel, so I wonder if part of your problem has been regional. Anyway...

What frustrates me most about the advice for vegetarians to get protein is that it usually centers around dairy - one of the top eight allergens. If not dairy, then soy - another of the top eight allergens. And then eggs too - another of the top eight allergens! (Ok, I care most about dairy since I can't have it. :P)

So, here's a list (some items more helpful than others), in order of protein content by weight (no meat, dairy, or soy is in this list, but eggs and nuts are), taken from the USDA Nutrient Database:

(a little hard to read here, I grant you, but quite useful..)

NDB_No Description Weight (g) Common Measure

Content per Measure

USDA National Nutrient Database for Standard Reference, Release 18

) Content of Selected Foods per Common Measure, sorted by nutrient content Protein ( g

16051 Beans, white, mature seeds, canned 262 1 cup 19.02

16070 Lentils, mature seeds, cooked, boiled, without salt 198 1 cup 17.86

16008 Beans, baked, canned, with franks 259 1 cup 17.48

16086 Peas, split, mature seeds, cooked, boiled, without salt 196 1 cup 16.35

16043 Beans, pinto, mature seeds, cooked, boiled, without salt 171 1 cup 15.41

16033 Beans, kidney, red, mature seeds, cooked, boiled, without salt 177 1 cup 15.35

16015 Beans, black, mature seeds, cooked, boiled, without salt 172 1 cup 15.24

20011 Buckwheat flour, whole-groat 120 1 cup 15.14

20046 Rice, white, long-grain, parboiled, enriched, dry 185 1 cup 15.00

16038 Beans, navy, mature seeds, cooked, boiled, without salt 182 1 cup 14.98

16025 Beans, great northern, mature seeds, cooked, boiled, without salt 177 1 cup 14.74

16072 Lima beans, large, mature seeds, cooked, boiled, without salt 188 1 cup 14.66

16057 Chickpeas (garbanzo beans, bengal gram), mature seeds, cooked, boiled, without salt 164 1 cup 14.53

11196 Cowpeas (blackeyes), immature seeds, frozen, cooked, boiled, drained, without salt 170 1 cup 14.43

16103 Refried beans, canned (includes USDA commodity) 252 1 cup 13.83

16034 Beans, kidney, red, mature seeds, canned 256 1 cup 13.44

16010 Beans, baked, canned, with pork and sweet sauce 253 1 cup 13.38

16063 Cowpeas, common (blackeyes, crowder, southern), mature seeds, cooked, boiled, without salt 172 1 cup 13.30

20044 Rice, white, long-grain, regular, raw, enriched 185 1 cup 13.19

16011 Beans, baked, canned, with pork and tomato sauce 253 1 cup 13.03

16006 Beans, baked, canned, plain or vegetarian 254 1 cup 12.07

11040 Lima beans, immature seeds, frozen, baby, cooked, boiled, drained, without salt 180 1 cup 11.97

16073 Lima beans, large, mature seeds, canned 241 1 cup 11.88

16058 Chickpeas (garbanzo beans, bengal gram), mature seeds, canned 240 1 cup 11.88

20022 Cornmeal, degermed, enriched, yellow 138 1 cup 11.70

20025 Cornmeal, self-rising, degermed, enriched, yellow 138 1 cup 11.61

16064 Cowpeas, common (blackeyes, crowder, southern), mature seeds, canned, plain 240 1 cup 11.38

11546 Tomato products, canned, paste, without salt added 262 1 cup 11.32

11038 Lima beans, immature seeds, frozen, fordhook, cooked, boiled, drained, without salt 170 1 cup 10.32

20020 Cornmeal, whole-grain, yellow 122 1 cup 9.91

12516 Seeds, pumpkin and squash seed kernels, roasted, with salt added 28.35 1 oz (142 seeds) 9.35

19061 Snacks, trail mix, tropical 140 1 cup 8.82

13350 Beef, cured, dried 28.35 1 oz 8.82

11313 Peas, green, frozen, cooked, boiled, drained, without salt 160 1 cup 8.24

16112 Miso 68.75 1 cup 8.04

16089 Peanuts, all types, oil-roasted, with salt 28.35 1 oz 7.95

06204 Soup, PROGRESSO HEALTHY CLASSICS LENTIL, canned, readyto-serve 242 1 cup 7.79

11464 Spinach, frozen, chopped or leaf, cooked, boiled, drained, without salt 190 1 cup 7.62

01143 Egg substitute, liquid 62.75 1/4 cup 7.53

11308 Peas, green, canned, regular pack, drained solids 170 1 cup 7.51

01123 Egg, whole, raw, fresh 58 1 extra large 7.30

19080 Candies, semisweet chocolate 168 1 cup 7.06

01132 Egg, whole, cooked, scrambled 61 1 large 6.76

16090 Peanuts, all types, dry-roasted, with salt 28.35 1 oz (approx 28) 6.71

16390 Peanuts, all types, dry-roasted, without salt 28.35 1 oz (approx 28) 6.71

20089 Wild rice, cooked 164 1 cup 6.54

01129 Egg, whole, cooked, hard-boiled 50 1 large 6.29

01123 Egg, whole, raw, fresh 50 1 large 6.29

01128 Egg, whole, cooked, fried 46 1 large 6.27

01131 Egg, whole, cooked, poached 50 1 large 6.27

12652 Nuts, pistachio nuts, dry roasted, with salt added 28.35 1 oz (47 nuts) 6.05

12061 Nuts, almonds 28.35 1 oz (24 nuts) 6.03

11461 Spinach, canned, drained solids 214 1 cup 6.01

11008 Artichokes, (globe or french), cooked, boiled, drained, without salt 168 1 cup 5.85

11093 Broccoli, frozen, chopped, cooked, boiled, drained, without salt 184 1 cup 5.70

20010 Buckwheat groats, roasted, cooked 168 1 cup 5.68

11101 Brussels sprouts, frozen, cooked, boiled, drained, without salt 155 1 cup 5.64

11303 Peas, edible-podded, frozen, cooked, boiled, drained, without salt 160 1 cup 5.60

01123 Egg, whole, raw, fresh 44 1 medium 5.54

11575 Turnip greens, frozen, cooked, boiled, drained, without salt 164 1 cup 5.49

12537 Seeds, sunflower seed kernels, dry roasted, with salt added 28.35 1 oz 5.48

11458 Spinach, cooked, boiled, drained, without salt 180 1 cup 5.35

11019 Asparagus, frozen, cooked, boiled, drained, without salt 180 1 cup 5.31


Tiffany aka "Have I Mentioned Chocolate Lately?"

Inconclusive Blood Tests, Positive Dietary Results, No Endoscopy

G.F. - September 2003; C.F. - July 2004

Hiker, Yoga Teacher, Engineer, Painter, Be-er of Me

Bellevue, WA

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The one thing I found was that the gluten-free diet doesn't really cut out many protein sources. It's not like I was getting all my protein from wheat products. The only issue is that a lot of the "fake" meat products contain wheat so those had to go. Instead of eating the pre-packaged veggie products, I use a lot more plain tofu and beans.

I eat a lot of cheese and eggs, too. All that cheese probably isn't good for me, but I do try to eat mozeralla more because it's lower in fat.


Gluten-Free since September 15, 2005.

Peanut-Free since July 2006.

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My 8 year old daughter is a gluten, casein, and soy free vegetarian. ... My life would be so much easier if she would eat meat! :)

Hi,

Do you think your daughter would answer some questions for my book? there are 12 I think, about health before gluten free, best advice, favourite foods etc... I am including some case studies to enable readers to realise that you can be vegetarian and gluten free and there are others out there who are doing it. I will be including a childrens chapter-for parents mainly but maybe you you tell me what information you think would be most valuable fpr parents pf gluten free vegetarians?

I'd love some input if you and or your daughter would be willing?

My email address is darklightsnapshot@yahoo.co.uk

Emma

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The one thing I found was that the gluten-free diet doesn't really cut out many protein sources. It's not like I was getting all my protein from wheat products.

Thank You, that is a good point about the gluten-free diet not cutting into our proptein quota's too harshly, you are right-the main issue is with vegetarian 'meats' which onvariably have wheat in them. Quorn doesn't -well, the plain Quorn is gluten-free but it is made on the same factory as the glutened products so there could be contamination issues...

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I love love LOVE Quorn! My family had the Quorn turkey for Thanksgiving dinner, and even the meat eaters enjoyed it!

I also find it insulting when people say, "Your diet is limited enough, why don't you just eat meat?" I don't tell other people what they should or shouldn't eat! My nutritionist is understanding and supportive, and we even went to the grocery store together to brainstorm meal ideas. For me, it is very important to get protein at all meals, as I have high blood sugar, and need to balance my carbs with fat and protein.

Actually, in this sense, my Celiac diagnosis was a blessing. I have been vegetarian since I was 4, and was diagnosed Celiac at 21. Before my diagnosis, I was a carb and junk food junkie. Because I was always slender, I never worried about nutrition. Once I was diagnosed, I started taking better care of myself, and even tried things like TOFU, which I now know, when properly prepared, is pretty darn tasty!

- Lauren

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Great thread. I have been vegetarian 35 years. Celiac was diagnosed 7 years ago. Because I was undiagnosed so long I developed many other sensetivities. Protiens seem to link them all. I eat no grain, or legumes. I found that high fat dairy works for me. Salicylates limit many choices so I depend on raw cahew and high fat dairy. I am able to handle yellow and green split peas as well.

I'm ordering the Quorn. Sounds interesting. I miss the fake meats. Thanks for the tip.

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I love love LOVE Quorn!

Me too, I stopped eating it in case of contamination but I've just started to include it again. Do you have any problems with it?

I also find it insulting when people say, "Your diet is limited enough, why don't you just eat meat?"

My dietician and Coeliac UK said that to me! or words to that effect anyway, terrible!

Would you be interested in contributing to my book? Means answering around 12 questions, you'll have your own page possibly with a small photograph of you but definately with your name. I think it would really help, you are a perfect candidate for the book...

My email is darklightsnapshot@yahoo.co.uk

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Great thread. I have been vegetarian 35 years. Celiac was diagnosed 7 years ago. Because I was undiagnosed so long I developed many other sensetivities. Protiens seem to link them all. I eat no grain, or legumes. I found that high fat dairy works for me. Salicylates limit many choices so I depend on raw cahew and high fat dairy. I am able to handle yellow and green split peas as well.

I'm ordering the Quorn. Sounds interesting. I miss the fake meats. Thanks for the tip.

The manufacturers do warn that there may be a risk of cross contamination so please please bear that in mind! I cut it out completely but have just reintroduced it today. The level of risk, I'm guessing here, will probably depend on the particular factory it is made in because other Quorn products do have gluten in them and as of yet they do not have a seperate production line.

It IS delicious and very easy to use as a meat substitute but go carefully...

I'd love for you to answer my case study questions for the book? I'll email you back :)

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Would you be interested in contributing to my book?

Would love to! I am the Publication Management student who took an interest in your book awhile ago :P Feel free to email me the questions, LMaruskin@email.msmary.edu, or you can email me and I can give you my phone #.

Cool, I would love to be able to help!

- Lauren

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There is a yahoo group called vegetariangf of Yahoo groups that is about vegetarianism and gluten-free living. You may find this helpful.

I eat about 90% vegetarian. I eat meat or fish about twice a week (trying to find ways to eat more fish, though). I get plenty of nutrients. It's harder to do so when gluten-free, but certainly not impossible at all.

Nutritional advice people get is bad for the most part, period. It's true that there's more misinformation out there about vegetarianism. But in general what I see recommended for gluten-free people is lots and lots of processed foods, substitutes for gluten products - As opposed to a diet that features whole grains, unprocessed foods, veggies, beans, etc.

I think a website with info about gluten-free veggie nutrition and lifestyle would be great.


*Gluten free since 7/06

*Cutting down on soy and dairy since 9/06

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