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AliceW

"this Product Was Processed In A Facility That Processes Wheat"

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Hi everyone,

Another CC question from a newbie!

It seems that there are two categories of gluten-free foods: those officially certified to be gluten free, processed in a dedicated gluten-free facility, etc, and those that do not contain gluten ingredients but that aren't guaranteed completely gluten-free due to manfacturing processes.

It seems to me that the difference in the level of restrictiveness between holding one's food intake to these two different standards is quite high. There are a LOT of foods that do not contain gluten ingredients but that are not necessarily manufactured for a celiac customer base...many chocolates, crackers, teas, makeup, etc etc. Being able to use these products makes the gluten-free diet SO much easier to follow. BUT, the question is: how much is too much?? The medical profession seems to feel that tiny traces of gluten are OK for most celiacs:

Alimentary Pharmacology & Therapeutics

Volume 19 Issue 12 Page 1277 - June 2004

doi:10.1111/j.1365-2036.2004.01961.x

Volume 19 Issue 12

The safe threshold for gluten contamination in gluten-free products. Can trace amounts be accepted in the treatment of coeliac disease?

P. Collin*, L. Thorell

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I eat these types of products. If I'm not sure how "clean" something is, I'll only eat a little until I trust the package. After several packages I tend to trust the manufacturer and eat as much as I want.

If you really sensitive (I am), you can figure out pretty quickly what you can comfortably eat and you want to avoid.


"But then, in all honesty, if scientists don't play god, who will?"

- James Watson

My sources are unreliable, but their information is fascinating.

- Ashleigh Brilliant

Leap, and the net will appear.

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I sometimes eat them. It depends on the food really, but if it's minimally processed I'll definitely give it a try. If it's something that's highly processed, I'm likely to not chance it. I just figure that the more it is processed the more it comes into contact with the possibly contaminated production lines, etc.

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i eat things that say they were packed in a facility that also processes/manufactures/etc wheat,

i used to be a nut about it when i was first dx, but i couldn't live like that- seemed that every gluten-free package was processed in the same facility as wheat, still have to live a little!

i think it's inevitable to get glutened, i'm still relatively new, but i'm sure some pros will tell you glutening can still happen... example, my mom told me to eat carrots at dinner, i did, i asked her what was in them (they tasted funny) and she said "oh, read the package" and right there on the list 3 gluten containing ingredients...

i do agree with you though, i think companies are putting that on their packages to cover themselves and try to avoid any legal probs. it's really up to you though- my support group has said that the chances are minimum for CC to happen when gluten-free is processed in the same facility

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i think it is mosty a CYA statement, but as of yet, i don't buy things for my girls if they say "processed in the same facility as......"


Christine

15 year old twins with celiac, diagnosed dec. 2005

11 year old daughter with celiac diagnosed dec 2005

17 year old son with celiac gene

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I don't eat products that have the statement "produced in a ..."


Tapioca intolerant

First cousin dx'd with Celiac Disease

Grandmother died of malnutrition b/c everything made her sick... sounds like celiac to me.

Gluten-free since June 2005

Dx with IBS February 2005

Blood tests both negative (or inconclusive?) for celiac (in 2002 and 2004)

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I draw the line at "manufactured on the same equipment as..." With the new labeling laws, alot of these "same facility" statements cropped up, and it made me realize that almost everything is made in a facility that also proccesses wheat -- certainly at big companies like Frito-Lay. Even Lays Stax, which have their own dedicated gluten-free line, would be manufactured in a facility that processes wheat, due to the other products the company makes.

I'm not sure I would even react to things made on the same equipment, but for now, I avoid them.


_____________________

w.g.i.b.s.

High IGG, normal IGA and TTG.

Very positive dietary response.

Gluten-free since 12/26/05.

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Alice,

I think its a combination of the CYA (we have actually had this convo before, so I know there are many who agree with that) and the fact that it really could be an issue.

I am an extremely sensitive Celiac, and I am notorious for reacting to things when others haven't :) In my 2.5 years of eating gluten free, I only know of two products that I reacted to that I shouldn't have. One, I believe was mislabeled (I later found they had other labeling problems) and the second was a potential ---albeit mild --- reaction to something that shared equipment. It was 2 years ago, I believe.

Also want to add that this is a relatively new statement that you will see for wheat, because of the 2006 Food Labeling Law...hence, the potential CYA.

So, it is a personal decision, but in general, my theory is along the lines of Jestgars.

Laura

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As always, thanks to everyone for the very helpful replies! :) I feel reassured. You guys are such a smart, supportive bunch of people; I feel really fortunate to have stumbled onto this site!

Alice :) :)

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To start with I avoided these products, as I was scared I might get glutened, and I think I have on occassions.

But now after a year gluten-free I am venturing out a bit more and will try these products on occassions.

If anything the last year has taught me how to say no to food, and to be my body's best friend and I have also learnt about moderation, so now if I try these products I will do it responibly and will be quite aware whether I have a reaction or not.

Not many diseases teach us a lot about food, but I only wish I knew what I know now 30 years ago.

Cathy

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To start with I avoided these products, as I was scared I might get glutened, and I think I have on occassions.

But now after a year gluten-free I am venturing out a bit more and will try these products on occassions.

If anything the last year has taught me how to say no to food, and to be my body's best friend and I have also learnt about moderation, so now if I try these products I will do it responibly and will be quite aware whether I have a reaction or not.

Not many diseases teach us a lot about food, but I only wish I knew what I know now 30 years ago.

Cathy

I'm with Kaycee- the "threshold" in Europe is 200 ppm and I have reacted to 33 ppm. I will occasionally chance it with facility but definitely not shared equipment.


***************************

Beverly

Gluten free since 2005

In the midst of winter, I found there was within me an invincible summer.

Albert Careb

36_35_6[1].gif

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I think it's a good faith CYA. It gives people information with which to make their own decisions, but also provides cover. It's unrealistic to expect dedicated lines for all potentially gluten-free foods - manufacturing lines are expensive. But it's also very difficult to trace down contamination when we know we're getting sick, but have no insight into the making of a product. So it's a compromise.

I will eat some products with these items, but it will often vary on the product, and I'll take into account other's experiences with the company in general. Dried fruit is usually a no if it's shared lines, but shared *buildings* worry me less than shared equipment.


Tiffany aka "Have I Mentioned Chocolate Lately?"

Inconclusive Blood Tests, Positive Dietary Results, No Endoscopy

G.F. - September 2003; C.F. - July 2004

Hiker, Yoga Teacher, Engineer, Painter, Be-er of Me

Bellevue, WA

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A shared facility means that somewhere in the plant there is wheat. Well, somewhere in my house there is wheat also. My wife eats some things which have gluten in them, so I don't live in a gluten-free house. The risk is, in my opinion, no greater when a food manufacturer states that they process wheat in the same facility.

Shared equipment is obviously a greater risk. My wife uses the same dishes and utensils that I do, and they are washed in the same dishwasher as mine. Her cereal bowl goes in there with everything else when she eats cereal that is not gluten-free.

I consider the type of food and the ease with which the equipment can be washed. I do worry about powdered things like flour, but other than those things, I don't really worry. Equipment that processes things like salad dressing can be cleaned fairly easily--anything which deals with liquid ingredients must be washed with plenty of water. Minute traces of the previous formula may remain, and gluten is a likely a small component of that product. You will encounter trace amounts of gluten in your life unless you live in a hermetically sealed bubble.

Are we even sure that a "gluten free facility" really is? Do any of the workers there eat gluten-containing products? How thoroughly do they wash before entering the plant? After their lunch break?

In short, I don't generally worry about a shared facility, nor about other CYA disclaimers, although I do consider the context.


Peter

Diagnosis by biopsy of practically non-existent villi; gluten-free since July 2000. I was retested five years later and the biopsy was normal. You can beat this disease!

Type 1 (autoimmune) diabetes diagnosed in March 1986

Markham, Ontario (borders on Toronto)

Celiac.com - Celiac Disease Board Moderator since 2007

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Guest cassidy

I do not eat foods produced in a facility that contains wheat. I started off not worrying about it but I kept getting sick. Unfortunately, I have found that I am very sensitive and those products get me most of the time.

Someone posted that their is wheat in their house. There is wheat in my house as well. I am very careful to wipe down counters, fridge handles, and wash my hands before making my food. I don't know how well other people/manufacturers do this, so I just don't chance it.

I really wish I could eat that stuff because I LOVE Amy's products and Baked Lay's but those are both out for me.

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It depends on the product. If I can get a similar product that I know is gluten free then I won't buy it. I should say that I am not the one with the gluten problem, but my daughter. I do buy her some rice cereal bars that are produced with things she is allergic to because they come in handy when she is running late (that's usually) and needs a quick breakfast or snack. So far no problems with them. I also bought some nutritional yeast that is produced with things we are allergic to because I had asked the store to special order it for me. The kind they sell contains whey and we are allergic. I tried the yeast in some stuffed potatoes and we didn't get sick.

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I avoid them. I believed they should be safe, but like Cassidy and others I kept getting sick. I do not get sick when I avoid these foods. I have become almost exclusively fresh fruit, meat, veggies and foods from dedicated gluten-free facilities.

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At first I was very paranoid and stayed away, but now I do eat them. I agree with a previous poster that I don't scarf down the whole package the first couple times though; but I am always cautious with any new food.


Ev in Michigan

GFDF since 8/20/05

Negative Bloodwork ~

Dr. encourages me to trust my

"Gut Reaction"

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I started off not worrying about it but I kept getting sick. Unfortunately, I have found that I am very sensitive and those products get me most of the time.

Someone posted that their is wheat in their house. There is wheat in my house as well. I am very careful to wipe down counters, fridge handles, and wash my hands before making my food. I don't know how well other people/manufacturers do this, so I just don't chance it.

I was the same as you Cassidy, at first I did not worry too much about what I was eating, if it looked gluten free, that was good. But I got caught a few too many times, and now I risk proccessed food only occassionally.

Yes we do have flour in our house, I work in a floured environment, namely noodles that get washed in the dishwasher and stick to my drinking mug.

But I have noticed since ditching most of the gluten free prepackaged, prepared food, with oodles of additives etc, I have hardly had any problem with being glutened, even though I work and live along side gluten eaters (that sounds a bit cannabalistic) .

So I think I have got it about right for my health and am not worrying about the gluten in my environment, the only thing I make sure of is that I will never cook with gluten flour again.

Cathy

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