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GlutenWrangler

Should I See A Doctor?

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I was diagnosed 7 months ago with celiac disease, and have made significant progress. The thing is that I don't know if I should get more help from a doctor. My last gastroenterologist was an idiot, and I stopped seeing him a long time ago. So I haven't had a gastroenterologist since being diagnosed. I read that some of the things that can prevent healing are bacterial overgrowth and pancreatic insufficiency. I know that I have a bacterial overgrowth problem, and I am treating it with very strong probiotics. I just don't know if it is worth seeing a doctor to see if everything else is ok. Have most of you done your healing on your own, or did you end up needing assistance from a doctor? Thanks for your help.

-Brian


Celiac Sprue

Multiple Food Allergies

Diagnosed June 2006

Stopped Eating June 2007

IV Nutrition: 6/27/07 - Present

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How do you feel? Are you making progress in your healing? It is really impossible for us to make that call. If you are feeling bad, and think that something else might be wrong, then a doctor might be able to help you (and I say might, as there is no guarantee). On the other hand, if you feel like you are getting better on your own, why bother with doctors?

Anyway, that is just my opinion. I hope you're doing okay.


I am a German citizen, married to a Canadian 29 years, four daughters, one son, seven granddaughters and four grandsons, with one more grandchild on the way in July 2009.

Intolerant to all lectins (including gluten), nightshades (potatoes, tomatoes, peppers, eggplant) and salicylates.

Asperger Syndrome, Tourette Syndrome, Addison's disease (adrenal insufficiency), hypothyroidism, fatigue syndrome, asthma

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

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I decided that whatever was wrong with my body would heal on its own and I prefer to wait it out rather than risk upsetting the balance by adding supplements or herbs or even probiotics. The only things I do take are vitamins and glucosamine/chondroitin/MSM (thanks Carla!) 2 or 3 times a week. Even these I'm cautious with. I think the human body is amazing and resilient and delicate and given the chance, once the damaging substances are removed, will heal on its own.


"But then, in all honesty, if scientists don't play god, who will?"

- James Watson

My sources are unreliable, but their information is fascinating.

- Ashleigh Brilliant

Leap, and the net will appear.

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Boy, this is a tough one. I always want to put great faith in our own bodies and the messages they give us as to how we're feeling, but mine certainly hasn't told me about some crucial things that fortunately were discovered almost by accident, and by my great family doctor. I had no symptoms, gastrointestinal or otherwise, of gluten intolerance, with the exception of borderline low iron. My doctor decided to pursue things and, miraculously in our world of docs being out to lunch, sent me for the celiac blood panel. I was shocked by the positive result, and more so by the damaged villi shown on my endoscope. I also was diagnosed a year later with hypothyroid, again with no symptoms. I think my body just needs to pay more attention! Or I simply need a reset button... :rolleyes:


Emily

diagnosed type one diabetic 1973

diagnosed celiac winter 2005

diagnosed hypothyroid spring 2006

But healthy and happy! 253.gif

11 year-old Son had negative blood panel, but went on gluten-free diet of his own volition to see if his concentration would improve, his temper abate, and his energy level would increase. Miraculous response!

The great are great only because we are on our knees.

--Pierre Joseph Proudhon (1809-1865)

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Elye, do you feel different now that you aren't eating gluten?


"But then, in all honesty, if scientists don't play god, who will?"

- James Watson

My sources are unreliable, but their information is fascinating.

- Ashleigh Brilliant

Leap, and the net will appear.

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I don't feel great, but I have made a lot of progress. No more severe stomach pain, bad dehydration, severe diarrhea or insomnia. But I was thinking that 7 months would show a major improvement in my overall health. I know it can take years to fully heal, but I'm only 22, so I figured I would heal a little faster. I still have loose stools and sometimes diarrhea. I still need about 3 gallons of liquid a day to stay well hydrated. And I'm still not near as functional as I need to be. When I got celiac disease, it ravaged my body in a very short period of time. I had to stop going to college over two years ago. I was diagnosed in June of 2006, and figured I would be close to normal again by September of 2007, when I plan to go back to finish my degree. At this rate, I don't know how much better I will be by then. I don't think there is anything else wrong with me related to celiac disease that I would need to see a doctor for. But since I don't know everyone's story, I'm not sure if I'm at a normal point after 7 months. I'm taking L-Glutamine and Probiotics to speed the healing along, but at this point it seems like the necessity for so much water and the diarrhea will never go away. Based on your experience, do you think I'm healing at a normal rate? Thanks,

-Brian


Celiac Sprue

Multiple Food Allergies

Diagnosed June 2006

Stopped Eating June 2007

IV Nutrition: 6/27/07 - Present

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Elye, do you feel different now that you aren't eating gluten?

It's funny...as I mentioned, I didn't have any classic symptoms before being diagnosed, and I really have always felt well. So no, I don't really feel any different...I'm still feeling well. However, I now DO react when I get glutened! I have the abdominal cramping, the bloating, the diahrrea...NOW I know what everybody was talking about! Makes sense, I guess--my lower intestine has healed and now when it reacts to the invading gluten, I can feel it!

Brian, have you thought about other food intolerances? Unfortunately, it is not uncommon for a celiac to go gluten-free and suddenly become sensitive to other foods, casein being a big one.


Emily

diagnosed type one diabetic 1973

diagnosed celiac winter 2005

diagnosed hypothyroid spring 2006

But healthy and happy! 253.gif

11 year-old Son had negative blood panel, but went on gluten-free diet of his own volition to see if his concentration would improve, his temper abate, and his energy level would increase. Miraculous response!

The great are great only because we are on our knees.

--Pierre Joseph Proudhon (1809-1865)

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I've been gluten-free about 10 months, and I've also been a little disappointed in my recovery. On the other hand, I feel WAY better than I did a year ago, so that's a positive thing. In my case, I was undiagnosed for at least 8 years, so I figure it will take me longer to heal than fpr people who were diagnosed more quickly. My belly feels much better, but I still have trouble sleeping, drink an awful lot of water, and feel generally tired.

I've definitely developed other food allergies. I've eliminatd eggs, dairy, soy and nuts --- all things I used to eat frequently

It's hard to be patient while healing. And it's not like there's any way to objectively measure the process, either. I mean, if you hurt your back, you can say "Oh, this month I can lift 10 more pounds than last month." With us, we can just feel 'better' or 'not better'. And, if you're like me, you have some days that pretty good and some that are pretty bad. It's a general improvement, not a steady improvement.

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I can't stand the need for so much water. Not only that, but the water has to be fresh poland spring water. The date on the bottle can't be more than a month old. It's hard enough just to get the water, never mind drinking 3 gallons of it. Granted, I have improived, but the need for so much water has not changed. Does this go away?


Celiac Sprue

Multiple Food Allergies

Diagnosed June 2006

Stopped Eating June 2007

IV Nutrition: 6/27/07 - Present

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I can't stand the need for so much water. Not only that, but the water has to be fresh poland spring water. The date on the bottle can't be more than a month old. It's hard enough just to get the water, never mind drinking 3 gallons of it. Granted, I have improived, but the need for so much water has not changed. Does this go away?

The body adapts to how much water it needs - people who drink that much regularly find that they need that much, but people who drink 1/10th that (less than 5 cups a day) may not be dehydrated either. You *may* find that you can slowly wean yourself off that much water (if you're not doing activities that cause you to sweat out lots of water or have a condition, like untreated diabetes, that causes frequent urination).


Tiffany aka "Have I Mentioned Chocolate Lately?"

Inconclusive Blood Tests, Positive Dietary Results, No Endoscopy

G.F. - September 2003; C.F. - July 2004

Hiker, Yoga Teacher, Engineer, Painter, Be-er of Me

Bellevue, WA

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I hear ya on the Water issue I used to drink maybe 2 gallons a day and then have a dry throat and night if I wasnt drinking water constantly. I have not been officially diagnosed, But gluen free for 1 month and Positve Enterolab Results. Now I have been gluten-free I have to remind myself to drink water, I drink maybe 4 bottles of water and a cup or 2 a night.

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Brian,

Make sure you are getting enough electrolytes, especially salt. If your electrolytes get out of whack (as they did for me), drinking water will actually make you thirstier. The reason is that the water doesn't get into your cells, because it needs the electrolytes to get through the cell membranes. The more you drink, the more dilute your blood electrolytes get, and the harder it is for the water to get into the cells. (I ended up in the hospital because of this about 3 years ago).

Gatorade helps, but it has a lot of sugar. I've been using a product called 'Endurolytes' by Hammer Nutrition, and it's helped reduce my need for water quite a bit. It's about $15.00 for 120 capsules, which is equivalent to about 30 quarts of Gatorade, so it's also cheaper. The casules are mostly salt, but also include other electrolytes (Ca, Mg, K). Endurolytes are designed for long-distance runners to take with water when they're racing/training.

Tommy

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Tommy,

I definitely make sure to get my electrolytes, especially since overhydration can be deadly. My total liquid for the day looks like this:

15 24oz bottles of water

4 Gatorades

2 Pepsi 12oz cans

Tiffany,

So what your saying is that I may have needed this much fluid before, but I don't need that much now, but my body thinks it needs it? That's interesting. I've never thought about it that way. Maybe I could try weaning off slowly. It's kind of like, how would I ever know how much I really need if I always drink the same amount. Good point. Thanks.


Celiac Sprue

Multiple Food Allergies

Diagnosed June 2006

Stopped Eating June 2007

IV Nutrition: 6/27/07 - Present

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