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mtdawber

Naturopathic Doctor

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I am considering going to a Naturopath to help me figure out my new diet, generally make sure I'm doing the right things and get suggestions for better living, etc. Has anyone gone to a Naturpath? Did it help? Your thoughts would be greatly appreciated! B)


Tanya

Canadian eh and new to all of this!

DH Diagnosed December 20, 2006

Waiting on Gatro appt. until April!

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Hi Tanya,

I'm new to all of this as well...was just diagnosed last month by a Naturopathic Dr. This was after going to several regular MD's over the years with my gastro complaints only to be diagnosed with IBS and GERD (btw, my GERD is completely GONE since going gluten-free, something I consider to be nothing short of a miracle). Anyway, I'm so glad I went to the Naturopath as I would have never thought that gluten was my problem and clearly my family doctor hadn't ever thought to test me for it. I do plan, however, to contact my regular MD and get a referral from her for a registered dietician. I'm not sure how well versed a Naturopathic Dr. would be in the gluten-free diet. A dietician can help you with meal plans ect. based on what kinds of foods you like to eat and your lifestyle. I don't think a Naturopath would be able to do these things for you. Sorry this got long but I'm just still so amazed at the change in my health since going gluten-free and the fact that none of the dr's I went to in the past had ever thought to test me for gluten intolerance.

Deb


Deb,

Diagnosed with gluten sensitivity 12/15/06...gluten-free since then.

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I haven't been to a naturopath since being diagnosed, but did prior to that. She gave me vitamins and supplements that I was supposed to take six times per day . . . I ended up having to go to a conventional MD because I had lupus-like signs and symptoms. I went off the vitamins et al for about three months, tried them again, and the same thing happened. So, that wasn't such a great experience.

After my diagnosis, I was seeing a conventional MD who practiced a lot of holistic, naturopathic medicine as well, but he flaked out and I had to stop seeing him. It was a sad loss.

Now, I just see my neurologists, a dietician, endocrinologist, a geneticist and a rehabilitation MD. All of them are very Okay with my interest in using vitamins / supplements to try to reduce my symptoms vs. medication, as long as they're gluten-free. So far, it appears to be working!!!

Good luck to you . . . . and if it works, keep going! If it doesn't, then stop. I've taken that attitude since my endocrinologist said, "If you don't like a doctor -- stop going to them. Don't spend your good money going to some idiot that doesn't have your best interests at heart." I thought that was pretty good advice!

Keep us updated!

Lynne


Lynne

Courage does not always roar. Sometimes it is the quiet voice at the end of the day that says, "I'll try tomorrow".

"There's not a word yet, for old friends we've just met. Part Heaven, part space, or have I found my place? You can just visit, but I plan to stay, I'm going to go back there some day." Gonzo, in the Muppet Movie

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Please remember to differentiate. . .a naturopath is NOT the same as a naturopathic doctor. In North America, a naturopath is abrreviated as an N.D.. . .they DO NOT go to med school and are not fully qualified doctors - they often know little or nothing about pharmacological medicines and can 'prescribe' natural remedies that are entirely untested. A naturopathic doctor is a M.D., or sometimes an N.M.D. and they are very very rare in North America, as there is only one med school in North America that offers an N.M.D. qualification (which requires two sessions of study at a British university which offers a N.M.D. qualification). A naturopathic doctor is a medical doctor who is licensed to prescribe proven natural remedies in place of or in combination with pharmacological remedies. If you can find yourself a genuine naturopathic doctor, I highly recommend it. . .I get my medical care from two very capable regular M.D.s and an N.M.D. dermatologist. If you can only find an N.D. or a naturopath, use at your own risk.

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Sophiekins -- WOW -- that is great information. I had no idea that there is actually an NMD. I knew that naturopaths weren't MD's, but had no idea that an MD could actually become a naturopathic doctor. I was skeptical about the woman that I saw, but she was given good references by some friends and acquaintances. Boy, they must have had better outcomes than I did! I think you're very lucky that you're in an area that actually has an NMD. Thanks for the heads up about this . . . xxxooo Lynne


Lynne

Courage does not always roar. Sometimes it is the quiet voice at the end of the day that says, "I'll try tomorrow".

"There's not a word yet, for old friends we've just met. Part Heaven, part space, or have I found my place? You can just visit, but I plan to stay, I'm going to go back there some day." Gonzo, in the Muppet Movie

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Please remember to differentiate. . .a naturopath is NOT the same as a naturopathic doctor. In North America, a naturopath is abrreviated as an N.D.. . .they DO NOT go to med school and are not fully qualified doctors - they often know little or nothing about pharmacological medicines and can 'prescribe' natural remedies that are entirely untested. A naturopathic doctor is a M.D., or sometimes an N.M.D. and they are very very rare in North America, as there is only one med school in North America that offers an N.M.D. qualification (which requires two sessions of study at a British university which offers a N.M.D. qualification). A naturopathic doctor is a medical doctor who is licensed to prescribe proven natural remedies in place of or in combination with pharmacological remedies. If you can find yourself a genuine naturopathic doctor, I highly recommend it. . .I get my medical care from two very capable regular M.D.s and an N.M.D. dermatologist. If you can only find an N.D. or a naturopath, use at your own risk.

Really? Where does that place my Naturopath? She graduated from a major university with a degree in microbiology and then graduated from Bastyr University (Naturopathic college in WA state) and has gone further in her licensing than most ND's and can legally prescribe things like antibiotics, thyroid meds, etc. Our insurance recognizes her as a primary care physician and covers her fully. She phones in prescriptions to a regular pharmacy when needed without problems. Are you sure that your information is correct?

My ND is absolutely fantastic and will send me to an MD when she feels that the problem is outside her scope of knowledge. She's been wonderful with helping me and several people I know with dietary modifications and diagnosis of some serious health problems. (She's the one who caught my kidney disease when the regular MD told me to just take diuretics. I probably would have died if I had followed his advice.)


Liz

Started Specific Carbohydrate Diet on 8-16-09 because son was diagnosed with Ulcerative Colitis and want to give him moral support.

Diagnosed with Minimal Change Nephrotic Syndrome in 2003. Discovered that going completely gluten-free put me in remission.

I would have despaired unless I had believed that I would see the goodness of the Lord in the land of the living. Psalms 27:13

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Congrats Liz, you are blessed to live in WA - the only state (to my knowledge) to accredit proper Naturopathic Doctors - and it sounds like you've found one. The N.M.D. qualification is unusual in America, and they are often only given an N.D. (because the FDA doesn't yet recognise the N.M.D.), making it difficult to distinguish the genuine ones from ordinary naturopaths. I should have been more specific in my original post. The ultimate test of whether you've got a real naturopathic doctor or just a naturopath is to ask them whether they can prescribe pharmaceutical antibiotics. If they can, they are close to what would be called an N.M.D. elsewhere in the world. If they can't, use their services at your own risk.

I'm not saying that there are no good naturopaths, all I'm saying is that the licensing rules for naturopaths are (for anyone familiar with the licensing rules that govern traditional medical doctors) scarily loose and there are a lot of quacks out there calling themselves naturopaths. A "naturopath" who can prescribe pharmaceuticals is someone you can probably trust because the licensing rules to be allowed to do this are quite stringent.

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Thanks for clarifying, Sophiekins. I agree that there are some "naturopaths" that are quacks. I have been to one. But I've been to two that are fantastic - both graduates of Bastyr. I guess we are fortunate in WA state!

Anyone considering seeing a naturopath should first ask some questions by phone about their philosophy and views on treatment - and their experience with any problems you need help with. I ruled out a couple just by asking the office manager some quick questions. (I would stay away from anyone who relies on "Applied Kinesiology", for example.)


Liz

Started Specific Carbohydrate Diet on 8-16-09 because son was diagnosed with Ulcerative Colitis and want to give him moral support.

Diagnosed with Minimal Change Nephrotic Syndrome in 2003. Discovered that going completely gluten-free put me in remission.

I would have despaired unless I had believed that I would see the goodness of the Lord in the land of the living. Psalms 27:13

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i'm also considering seeing a naturopath. the one i'm looking at went to bastyr as well. is that good?


Diagnosed in March 2006 after being in the hospital due to pancreatitis due to undiagnosed celiac

years of being told i had IBS, taking numerous IBS medications (since the age of fifteen)

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i'm also considering seeing a naturopath. the one i'm looking at went to bastyr as well. is that good?

Bastyr has a good reputation. You should still ask some questions, but it is a good sign.


Liz

Started Specific Carbohydrate Diet on 8-16-09 because son was diagnosed with Ulcerative Colitis and want to give him moral support.

Diagnosed with Minimal Change Nephrotic Syndrome in 2003. Discovered that going completely gluten-free put me in remission.

I would have despaired unless I had believed that I would see the goodness of the Lord in the land of the living. Psalms 27:13

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I am seeing a naturopathic doctor. Here in Canada things are even more complicated. There are naturopathic practitioners, and they can just have taken a weekend course or an online course to call themselves that. And then there are naturopathic doctors, who have had the same amount of training as an MD, from a college of naturopathic medicine. That's what my doctor did.

The Canadian government has been debating on whether they'll let naturopathic doctors prescribe things like antibiotics and hormones (like Armour thyroid for instance) for quite a while. My doctor was really hoping that by December he would have been able to prescribe those things, but it didn't happen yet. Of course, regular MDs are opposed to that, they'd lose money if people can go to a naturopathic doctor for those things.

So, if you check out a naturopath, and you don't see the diploma from an accredited institution on the wall, be wary.


I am a German citizen, married to a Canadian 29 years, four daughters, one son, seven granddaughters and four grandsons, with one more grandchild on the way in July 2009.

Intolerant to all lectins (including gluten), nightshades (potatoes, tomatoes, peppers, eggplant) and salicylates.

Asperger Syndrome, Tourette Syndrome, Addison's disease (adrenal insufficiency), hypothyroidism, fatigue syndrome, asthma

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

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I am seeing a naturopathic doctor. Here in Canada things are even more complicated. There are naturopathic practitioners, and they can just have taken a weekend course or an online course to call themselves that. And then there are naturopathic doctors, who have had the same amount of training as an MD, from a college of naturopathic medicine. That's what my doctor did.

The Canadian government has been debating on whether they'll let naturopathic doctors prescribe things like antibiotics and hormones (like Armour thyroid for instance) for quite a while. My doctor was really hoping that by December he would have been able to prescribe those things, but it didn't happen yet. Of course, regular MDs are opposed to that, they'd lose money if people can go to a naturopathic doctor for those things.

So, if you check out a naturopath, and you don't see the diploma from an accredited institution on the wall, be wary.

Hi UrsaMajor

I used to see a homepath/ND in toronto who i loved! she actually changed my life. it was when i had "IBS" which was probably celiac. i had tried every medication and the drs were just like, theres nothing else we can do for you so my mom took me to her. she immeditaly put me on a wheat free diet (Not gluten free) and some other herbs and stuff. within months i was fine! she never mentioned celiac but she was on the right track. the naturopath emailed me back and im goign to make an appt as soon as possible. here is the link if anyone is curious:

http://www.beaconnaturopathic.com/

Jess


Diagnosed in March 2006 after being in the hospital due to pancreatitis due to undiagnosed celiac

years of being told i had IBS, taking numerous IBS medications (since the age of fifteen)

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Your doctor looks like a good one. And naturopathic doctors actually get training in nutrition, while MDs get pretty much none, and know nothing about nutrition, and how food can make you ill (or well, for that matter).

My doctor didn't get enough training on salicylates and thought most herbs didn't contain a lot. That's why we tried herbals first for the adrenal and thyroid problems, because I stupidly agreed that those small amounts would be okay (he asked, it was my own fault). I got really sick, and my temperatures went down even further.

So, I lent him my e-book (on a C D) 'The Salicylate Handbook' to educate him over the Christmas holidays. He printed almost all of it (over a hundred pages) and now has a big binder, which he uses as a reference when dealing with me (and I am sure it will benefit others). It takes days to read all the information, and he is willing to do that to help me. You find me an MD who would spend days to help a patient.

He is also willing to take a seminar on IV therapy (which he would be allowed to administer) if he thought it would help me.

And Sophie, if a doctor is an ND, he is a REAL doctor. Just like MD means medical doctor, ND is a naturopathic doctor, and and a DC is a doctor of chiropractic. They are ALL medical doctors, needing to get their pre-med science degree before entering whichever university/college of their choice after.

Actually, chiropractic and naturopathic doctors get more training in quite a few things than MDs. and are a ton more knowledgeable in many ways than an MD.

It's only that the MDs seem to have most of the power given to them that makes people think they know more and are better.

My naturopath and chiropractor are my main doctors, I use my MD only for referrals and writing prescriptions when I need them. Because she is pretty clueless, while the other two are awesome.

Another difference is, that most MDs are happy to stick with what they've learned in medical school many years ago, and aren't up to date on a lot of things. While chiropractors and naturopaths constantly go to seminars to stay up to date on new developments and new therapies.


I am a German citizen, married to a Canadian 29 years, four daughters, one son, seven granddaughters and four grandsons, with one more grandchild on the way in July 2009.

Intolerant to all lectins (including gluten), nightshades (potatoes, tomatoes, peppers, eggplant) and salicylates.

Asperger Syndrome, Tourette Syndrome, Addison's disease (adrenal insufficiency), hypothyroidism, fatigue syndrome, asthma

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

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Your doctor looks like a good one. And naturopathic doctors actually get training in nutrition, while MDs get pretty much none, and know nothing about nutrition, and how food can make you ill (or well, for that matter).

My doctor didn't get enough training on salicylates and thought most herbs didn't contain a lot. That's why we tried herbals first for the adrenal and thyroid problems, because I stupidly agreed that those small amounts would be okay (he asked, it was my own fault). I got really sick, and my temperatures went down even further.

So, I lent him my e-book (on a C D) 'The Salicylate Handbook' to educate him over the Christmas holidays. He printed almost all of it (over a hundred pages) and now has a big binder, which he uses as a reference when dealing with me (and I am sure it will benefit others). It takes days to read all the information, and he is willing to do that to help me. You find me an MD who would spend days to help a patient.

He is also willing to take a seminar on IV therapy (which he would be allowed to administer) if he thought it would help me.

And Sophie, if a doctor is an ND, he is a REAL doctor. Just like MD means medical doctor, ND is a naturopathic doctor, and and a DC is a doctor of chiropractic. They are ALL medical doctors, needing to get their pre-med science degree before entering whichever university/college of their choice after.

Actually, chiropractic and naturopathic doctors get more training in quite a few things than MDs. and are a ton more knowledgeable in many ways than an MD.

It's only that the MDs seem to have most of the power given to them that makes people think they know more and are better.

My naturopath and chiropractor are my main doctors, I use my MD only for referrals and writing prescriptions when I need them. Because she is pretty clueless, while the other two are awesome.

Another difference is, that most MDs are happy to stick with what they've learned in medical school many years ago, and aren't up to date on a lot of things. While chiropractors and naturopaths constantly go to seminars to stay up to date on new developments and new therapies.

Thanks for the information! i just called and the first appt costs 223! is that alot or is that normal!


Diagnosed in March 2006 after being in the hospital due to pancreatitis due to undiagnosed celiac

years of being told i had IBS, taking numerous IBS medications (since the age of fifteen)

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Thanks for the information! i just called and the first appt costs 223! is that alot or is that normal!

My first appointment (one hour long) was $150.00. Now I pay $300.00 in advance, and get a discount, getting six half an hour appointments for that (normally a half an hour appointment would be $65.00 I think).

Fortunately our private insurance will cover up to $300.00 a year per person in our household for naturopathic medicine. So, at least six appointments are covered.


I am a German citizen, married to a Canadian 29 years, four daughters, one son, seven granddaughters and four grandsons, with one more grandchild on the way in July 2009.

Intolerant to all lectins (including gluten), nightshades (potatoes, tomatoes, peppers, eggplant) and salicylates.

Asperger Syndrome, Tourette Syndrome, Addison's disease (adrenal insufficiency), hypothyroidism, fatigue syndrome, asthma

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

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I love mine, and after reading this thread, I checked her credentials and she did graduate from Bastyr as well! (Seems to be a common link here..) (By the way, she is in NH if anyone is looking for a referral to her...)

She is the one doctor that listened to me and believed me when I was sick and told me we would find out what was causing this. The first one out of six doctors.

I found her through a friend that had a successful experience, if possible, I think referrals are the best way to go. (Isn't that true of just about anything though?? :)

Good luck!


Gluten free since Sept. 2006

Improved on gluten free diet

Enterolab results confirmed suspicions on Jan. 29th 2007

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Let me say this again: a Naturopathic Doctor is a MEDICAL doctor (someone who went to an accredited medical school. . .like Bastyr) who is trained to use traditional homeopathic remedies in tandem with or as a substitute for pharmaceutical remedies. A naturopath is not a doctor, nor is a chiropractor, except is the same way that my cousin is, who is a "doctor" of computer science. The gold standard is to ask what they can prescribe. If they cannot prescribe antibiotics or grade three pain remedies (prescription pain relief), they are NOT a doctor (as a side note, you'll notice that your MD, your NMD, and your dentist can prescribe these, while your naturopath, along with your chiropractor, your hairdresser and your mechanic, cannot). Bastyr is one of the few colleges in North America which provides students with medical training that is elsewhere considered to lead to a degree as an NMD.

I am not saying that there are no good naturopaths (ie, providers of homeopathic remedies who are NOT doctors), nor am I saying that there are no bad MDs (trust me. . .I've met my fair share). What I am saying is that there is a difference (a substantial one) between a Naturopath and a Naturopathic Doctor, just as there is a difference between a nurse and a brain surgeon and that the differences are important (would you really trust a nurse to do brain surgery? what about an EMT?. . .who, by the way, takes a three week course, unlike many naturopaths who "qualified" after a weekend online seminar).

I am the first to admit that it was my NMD dermatologist who finally sorted out my disfiguring skin condition (in five minutes, no less). . .while no fewer than eight conventional dermatologists threw up their hands in despair. And I see an NMD GP whenever I can get my hands on one. . .simply because he makes his remedies right in front of me (and they work), unlike my MD who has them made anonymously in China somewhere.

And you don't need a science degree to go to medical school, just a selection of the right courses. I have a friend who is now an MD, but her undergraduate degree is in music.

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