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vampella

Income Tax & Claiming My Daughters Foods

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I would like to claim e's foods on our income tax but we need a note from the dr. Has anyone had a doctor write it up with only AMAZING dietary response? I am sure Emmah's ped will want to but I'm not 100 % sure if he can without breaking some law or oath.

TIA


Char

Emmah 4 years- Celiac , gluten-free October 2006

Leigh-Ann 7 Years- Gluten lite

Gary- possible celiac

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Many times a doctor will view a positive dietary response and consider that a diagnosis.

Taxes claims are not all that easy. You can claim the DIFFERENCE in cost between regular bread and gluten free bread, as well as other products that are gluten free. And accounting can be very difficult, but possible.

Others have said, that might send a red flags for an audit. It is legal to do so.


Lisa

Gluten Free - August 15, 2004

"Not all who wander are lost" - JRR Tolkien

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Char, some people have tried deducting their foods, and found it wasn't worth the time and effort. You can only claim the difference between what regular food costs, and what gluten-free food is. So, then for every loaf of bread, every pack of cookies, every pizza, you'd have to go and find the prize of the normal item, and deduct it from what you paid for the gluten-free item.

You have to keep all the receipts, do all that research on what normal items are that are like the gluten-free items, do all that calculating, and in the end, if the difference between her foods and regular foods doesn't exceed a certain amount (which I think is quite a lot), you don't even qualify for a tax deduction.

Anyway, you can give it a try. I have my doubts that her doctor would break any law if he puts 'gluten intolerant', as it's obvious and true.


I am a German citizen, married to a Canadian 29 years, four daughters, one son, seven granddaughters and four grandsons, with one more grandchild on the way in July 2009.

Intolerant to all lectins (including gluten), nightshades (potatoes, tomatoes, peppers, eggplant) and salicylates.

Asperger Syndrome, Tourette Syndrome, Addison's disease (adrenal insufficiency), hypothyroidism, fatigue syndrome, asthma

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

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You can claim gluten-free foods on your tax????

Wow...wish we had that here in Australia!!

Good to see the govt acknowledge the extra financial burdeon placed on families! :)


Mum to a great 11yo boy with:

Ceoliac Disease

Type I Diabetes

Multiple allergies to foods, animal furs and medications

Asthma

Eczema

Allergic Conjunctivitis

Migraine

Angular Chelitis

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I've done the tax claim for the last three years. It does make a big difference with our taxes as we are a household of two on a single persons pensions.

It does take some work though, so you'll have to decide for yourself if it's worth it to you with your individual income.

Note, that I am doing taxes in Canada. We treat it the same way you do with your other medical deductions.


Shirley

[save the Earth, It's the only planet with chocolate and wine.

It isn't about waiting for the storm to pass...

It's about learning to dance in the rain.

Gluten free since 1989

West Kootenay.... British Columbia

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I've done the tax claim for the last three years. It does make a big difference with our taxes as we are a household of two on a single persons pensions.

It does take some work though, so you'll have to decide for yourself if it's worth it to you with your individual income.

Note, that I am doing taxes in Canada. We treat it the same way you do with your other medical deductions.

Ya we are in Canada too I should have noted that. I have all my recipts so I am hopeful that the Dr will give me a letter. I know that I also only get the difference.

I'm getting my taxes done at H&R this year lol I'm not attempting that myselfLOL.

Thanks everyone for your advice, you guys ar ethe best!!!!


Char

Emmah 4 years- Celiac , gluten-free October 2006

Leigh-Ann 7 Years- Gluten lite

Gary- possible celiac

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I would like to claim e's foods on our income tax but we need a note from the dr. Has anyone had a doctor write it up with only AMAZING dietary response? I am sure Emmah's ped will want to but I'm not 100 % sure if he can without breaking some law or oath.

TIA

I would love to claim my food too, but I don't have an official diagnosis. My doctor wants me to eat gluten because she is sure that I have celiac, but I don't want that pain.


Tapioca intolerant

First cousin dx'd with Celiac Disease

Grandmother died of malnutrition b/c everything made her sick... sounds like celiac to me.

Gluten-free since June 2005

Dx with IBS February 2005

Blood tests both negative (or inconclusive?) for celiac (in 2002 and 2004)

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Ya we are in Canada too I should have noted that. I have all my recipts so I am hopeful that the Dr will give me a letter. I know that I also only get the difference.

I'm getting my taxes done at H&R this year lol I'm not attempting that myselfLOL.

Thanks everyone for your advice, you guys ar ethe best!!!!

According to CRA, you must have a diagnosis of celiac to be able to claim gluten free food. I understand that this does not include non-celiac gluten intolerance or wheat allergies. It may be worth contacting CRA for further clarification.

Michelle

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In Canada, you need a documented diagnosis of celiac disease. You can them make a medical expense claim for the difference between the cost of gluten-free food and "normal" food, but only for that portion of the gluten-free food actually eaten by the celiac.

I am a celiac, but my wife is not. We both mostly eat gluten-free food--it is just simpler that way. I can claim the difference in cost for a gluten-free loaf of bread, compared to regular bread, but must pro-rate it based on the number of slices I eat compared to what Jacquie eats. If, for example, the loaf I buy has 20 slices for $6 (.30 per slice) compared to a regular loaf of 24 slices for $3.60 (.15 per slice) and I eat 10 of the 20 slices, then I can claim fifteen cents per slice for each of those slices, that is, $1.50.

[The numbers are for illustrative purposes only]

Then, on line 330 of your tax return, you can claim this expense IF it exceeds 3% of your net income, or $1884, whichever is less

Keep detailed records of how many slices of bread, or English muffins, or bagels, or whatever each member of the household ate--you can only claim the ones eaten by a diagnosed celiac, and only the difference in cost compared to an ordinary comparable product.

All in all, a royal pain in the @$$.


Peter

Diagnosis by biopsy of practically non-existent villi; gluten-free since July 2000. I was retested five years later and the biopsy was normal. You can beat this disease!

Type 1 (autoimmune) diabetes diagnosed in March 1986

Markham, Ontario (borders on Toronto)

Celiac.com - Celiac Disease Board Moderator since 2007

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In Canada, you need a documented diagnosis of celiac disease. You can them make a medical expense claim for the difference between the cost of gluten-free food and "normal" food, but only for that portion of the gluten-free food actually eaten by the celiac.

I am a celiac, but my wife is not. We both mostly eat gluten-free food--it is just simpler that way. I can claim the difference in cost for a gluten-free loaf of bread, compared to regular bread, but must pro-rate it based on the number of slices I eat compared to what Jacquie eats. If, for example, the loaf I buy has 20 slices for $6 (.30 per slice) compared to a regular loaf of 24 slices for $3.60 (.15 per slice) and I eat 10 of the 20 slices, then I can claim fifteen cents per slice for each of those slices, that is, $1.50.

[The numbers are for illustrative purposes only]

Then, on line 330 of your tax return, you can claim this expense IF it exceeds 3% of your net income, or $1884, whichever is less

Keep detailed records of how many slices of bread, or English muffins, or bagels, or whatever each member of the household ate--you can only claim the ones eaten by a diagnosed celiac, and only the difference in cost compared to an ordinary comparable product.

All in all, a royal pain in the @$$.

:lol: Peter, I don't have that problem as my hubby refuses to eat gluten free. But it is still a pain making up the summary chart.


Shirley

[save the Earth, It's the only planet with chocolate and wine.

It isn't about waiting for the storm to pass...

It's about learning to dance in the rain.

Gluten free since 1989

West Kootenay.... British Columbia

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