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bklynceliac

All Major Beers Gluten-free?

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Went into the local shoppe looking for Redbridge, which they didn't have. However, I spoke to a very intense beer guy at this very intense beer shop (Bierkraft in Park Slope, Brooklyn for any locals), who told me that all major market beers are actually gluten free. He said it had to do with the anti-bacterial filter they're passed through being way too small to allow any gluten molecules into the beer. He was very specific in his explanation, but it sounded a little fishy to me. Anyone else heard this? Anyone tried major beers (bud, miller, coors etc) and not had any problems? Seemed like an interesting theory either way.


Diagnosed through Enterolab (9.27.06)

Antigliadin IgA 164 (Normal Range <10 Units)

Antitissue Transglutaminase IgA 75 Units (Normal Range <10 Units)

Quantitative Microscopic Fat Score 874 Units (Normal Range <300 Units)

Fecal anti-casein (cow’s milk) IgA antibody 73 Units (Normal Range <10 Units)

HLA-DQ 2,1 (Subtype 2,5)

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This has been around for awhile but I personally don't believe it and wouldn't drink those beers (of course I became beer snob years ago and quit drinking those beers anyway). Allegedly some of those mass-produced beers have indeed been tested for gluten and and no measureable gluten was found, but I can't tell you which ones. The gluten content of non-wheat beers probably is pretty small, especially when compared to breads and pastas, but I still wouldn't go there without more proof.

richard

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Went into the local shoppe looking for Redbridge, which they didn't have. However, I spoke to a very intense beer guy at this very intense beer shop (Bierkraft in Park Slope, Brooklyn for any locals), who told me that all major market beers are actually gluten free. He said it had to do with the anti-bacterial filter they're passed through being way too small to allow any gluten molecules into the beer. He was very specific in his explanation, but it sounded a little fishy to me. Anyone else heard this? Anyone tried major beers (bud, miller, coors etc) and not had any problems? Seemed like an interesting theory either way.

aHHH! Do not drink beer, it is made from barley and you might as well have a real cheeseburger. It is a rumor and an old wives tale.


Gluten Free since April '04

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Here's what it says in Wikipedia:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gluten_free_beer

One listing of gluten-free beers:

http://www.bellaonline.com/articles/art30583.asp


McDougall diet (low fat vegan) since 6/00

Gluten free since 1/6/07

Soy free and completely casein and egg free since 2/15/07

Yeast free, on and off, since 3/1/07 -- I can't notice any difference one way or the other

Enterolab results -- 2/15/07

Fecal Antigliladin IgA 140 (Normal Range <10 units)

Fecal Antitissue Transglutaminase IgA 50 (Normal Range <10 units)

Quantitative Microscopic Fecal Fat Score 517 (Normal Range <300 units)

Fecal anti-casein (cow's milk) IgA antibody 127 (Normal Range <10 units)

HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 1 0501

HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 2 06xx

Serologic equivalent: HLA-DQ 1,1 (subtype 5,6)

Fecal anti-ovalbumin (chicken egg) IgA antibody 11 (Normal range <10 units)

Fecal Anti-Saccharomyces cerevisiae (dietary yeast) IgA 11 (Normal range <10 units)

Fecal Anti-Soy IgA 119 (Normal Range < 10 units)

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Beer could very well test at zero gluten, but that's not because it's anywhere near gluten-free! From everything I've read, it seems the ELISA test is designed for for omega-gliadin, which is a component of wheat gluten -- so it won't detect barley, rye, or oats.

The way I figure it, if Budweiser were gluten-free, Anheuser-Busch would never spend the money to come up with a gluten-free beer; they'd just put "gluten-free" on the Bud label.

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Guest cassidy

There was someone here a while ago who said he could tolerate one of the domestic beers like bud light but if he tried a dark beer or microbrew he would get sick. Then again that is around the time someone else said they could eat normal donuts and were fine and then later posted that they had a very bad delayed reaction.

Personally, I'm highly sensitive and I wouldn't give it a try because I don't usually eat things produced on the same lines as gluten and having a beer isn't worth being sick for a few weeks.

I would also think that the people who make gluten free beers are highly intense beer folks and if the regular beers are gluten-free then then they wouldn't spend their time making a gluten-free beer. The one I tried tasted good but it wasn't very carbonated. My favorite part of a beer is the intense carbonation that almost burns your throat when you take a big sip - I haven't found that in the gluten-free variety yet.

So, while I don't know for sure, I'm not going to give it a try.

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Yeah, well G W-ya sometimes sounds like he knows what he is talking about too. Oh wait, no he doesn't...sorry bad example.


Dx and Gluten Free since 1996

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IMHO Bud Light is more like water than beer. Maybe that's why he could drink it without difficulty. :lol:

Good thing I prefer wine or scotch. But if I'm still going gluten-free come baseball season (no diagnosis yet and this is only my second week on the diet), I don't know what I'm going to do. It just seems wrong to sit there drinking wine :rolleyes: or not drinking at all :o Maybe if my team wasn't always in the cellar, it would be easier ...


McDougall diet (low fat vegan) since 6/00

Gluten free since 1/6/07

Soy free and completely casein and egg free since 2/15/07

Yeast free, on and off, since 3/1/07 -- I can't notice any difference one way or the other

Enterolab results -- 2/15/07

Fecal Antigliladin IgA 140 (Normal Range <10 units)

Fecal Antitissue Transglutaminase IgA 50 (Normal Range <10 units)

Quantitative Microscopic Fecal Fat Score 517 (Normal Range <300 units)

Fecal anti-casein (cow's milk) IgA antibody 127 (Normal Range <10 units)

HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 1 0501

HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 2 06xx

Serologic equivalent: HLA-DQ 1,1 (subtype 5,6)

Fecal anti-ovalbumin (chicken egg) IgA antibody 11 (Normal range <10 units)

Fecal Anti-Saccharomyces cerevisiae (dietary yeast) IgA 11 (Normal range <10 units)

Fecal Anti-Soy IgA 119 (Normal Range < 10 units)

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this is when the hard cider comes in handy! unless the park doesn't allow glass bottles... I haven't seen canned cider in the US.

Hard cider sounds like a great idea, but I'll have to do that watching games at home. They don't allow you to bring in your own food or drink at all -- even water. And they search your bags on the way in. <_< The idea is to force you to buy the expensive stuff the vendors sell inside.


McDougall diet (low fat vegan) since 6/00

Gluten free since 1/6/07

Soy free and completely casein and egg free since 2/15/07

Yeast free, on and off, since 3/1/07 -- I can't notice any difference one way or the other

Enterolab results -- 2/15/07

Fecal Antigliladin IgA 140 (Normal Range <10 units)

Fecal Antitissue Transglutaminase IgA 50 (Normal Range <10 units)

Quantitative Microscopic Fecal Fat Score 517 (Normal Range <300 units)

Fecal anti-casein (cow's milk) IgA antibody 127 (Normal Range <10 units)

HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 1 0501

HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 2 06xx

Serologic equivalent: HLA-DQ 1,1 (subtype 5,6)

Fecal anti-ovalbumin (chicken egg) IgA antibody 11 (Normal range <10 units)

Fecal Anti-Saccharomyces cerevisiae (dietary yeast) IgA 11 (Normal range <10 units)

Fecal Anti-Soy IgA 119 (Normal Range < 10 units)

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bah! go to a microbrew and talk to them about the process. (not to mention that wheat isn't the problem, but barley.) you may get *way* less gluten in beer than bread, but it is not worth it!


Tiffany aka "Have I Mentioned Chocolate Lately?"

Inconclusive Blood Tests, Positive Dietary Results, No Endoscopy

G.F. - September 2003; C.F. - July 2004

Hiker, Yoga Teacher, Engineer, Painter, Be-er of Me

Bellevue, WA

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I remember how sick beer used to make me. Of course I had no idea why I was getting so sick back then. I loved beer even though it had serious consequences. There is no way (in my opinion) that beer is gluten free.


Tapioca intolerant

First cousin dx'd with Celiac Disease

Grandmother died of malnutrition b/c everything made her sick... sounds like celiac to me.

Gluten-free since June 2005

Dx with IBS February 2005

Blood tests both negative (or inconclusive?) for celiac (in 2002 and 2004)

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Hard cider sounds like a great idea, but I'll have to do that watching games at home. They don't allow you to bring in your own food or drink at all -- even water. And they search your bags on the way in. <_< The idea is to force you to buy the expensive stuff the vendors sell inside.

get a note from your docotor explaining celiac disease, carry it with you. bc of the ADA laws, any stadium or place like that that does not cell gluten free food cannot deny you bringing in your own food, i always carry my own. it should be NO problem at all.


Gluten Free since April '04

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IMHO Bud Light is more like water than beer. Maybe that's why he could drink it without difficulty. :lol:

Good thing I prefer wine or scotch. But if I'm still going gluten-free come baseball season (no diagnosis yet and this is only my second week on the diet), I don't know what I'm going to do. It just seems wrong to sit there drinking wine :rolleyes: or not drinking at all :o Maybe if my team wasn't always in the cellar, it would be easier ...

I think if you try to sip a glass of wine at a baseball game then I have no doubt that a "Milwaukee's Best" can will come crashing down on you.

Tom

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The way I figure it, if Budweiser were gluten-free, Anheuser-Busch would never spend the money to come up with a gluten-free beer; they'd just put "gluten-free" on the Bud label.

Okay that is exactly what I was gonna say.


Jillian

Positive Blood test and Biopsy

Inflamed stomach lining

Gluten free since July 6, 2005

Tarrytown, NY

"Sometimes being a b$tch is all a woman has to hold onto." - Dolores Claiborne

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Oh, I don't mean to whine. They do sell gluten-free food and drink, just not the stuff I want :rolleyes: I don't know that I could get a doctor to explain why I need hard cider :lol: I haven't been officially diagnosed yet, anyway. I try to stay away from doctors all I can. I'm awaiting my ordered Enterolab tests now ...

I'm sure the selections will be better in a year when we have our new stadium (fingers crossed). But I'll certainly bear in mind the doctor's note idea -- it may come in useful.


McDougall diet (low fat vegan) since 6/00

Gluten free since 1/6/07

Soy free and completely casein and egg free since 2/15/07

Yeast free, on and off, since 3/1/07 -- I can't notice any difference one way or the other

Enterolab results -- 2/15/07

Fecal Antigliladin IgA 140 (Normal Range <10 units)

Fecal Antitissue Transglutaminase IgA 50 (Normal Range <10 units)

Quantitative Microscopic Fecal Fat Score 517 (Normal Range <300 units)

Fecal anti-casein (cow's milk) IgA antibody 127 (Normal Range <10 units)

HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 1 0501

HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 2 06xx

Serologic equivalent: HLA-DQ 1,1 (subtype 5,6)

Fecal anti-ovalbumin (chicken egg) IgA antibody 11 (Normal range <10 units)

Fecal Anti-Saccharomyces cerevisiae (dietary yeast) IgA 11 (Normal range <10 units)

Fecal Anti-Soy IgA 119 (Normal Range < 10 units)

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