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kschell

Celiac Girl Scout Campout

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I'm new to this forum, but not new to Celiac disease. My daughter and I both are Celiac. She is 9 we are going on our first G.S. campout with the service unit. There will be limited access to the kitchen where food is prepared and then served cafeteria style. If anyone has ever been in this situation I would appreciate any responses to how you handled it. Thanks!

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I have not been in this situation, but would love to read the responses from those who have. My son is a Cub Scout and is supposed to go to Webelo Camp this summer. Both of us are gluten free - and I have no idea how that is going to work. I hope you get a lot of responses!


Jayhawkmom -

Mom of three....

Jay - 11

Bean - 8

Ian - 3

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kschell,

Will you have access to keep food cold, like a refrigerator or a cooler (ice replenished each day)? Are there limitations on how much you can bring to camp? Will you have access to a microwave?


Phyllis

Gluten Free - 30 years

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Chelsea (Penguin) who belongs to this board used to (not sure if she still does) help out with girlscouts. I think she was a troop leader and of course Celiac to boot. I'm sure she would be able to help you. You might try PMing her for more info.

-Jessica :rolleyes:


Jessica

Gluten Free since 12-31-2002!!

Kansas

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I am a scout leader. The first thing you need to do is contact whoever is running the event and get the menu. Let them know of your daughter's restrictions. Often, if you tell them before hand they can make different choices. For example, we didn't find out about a peanut allergy until the day she arrived-we would have chosen a snack other than ants on a log!

If your troop is planning their own food, I would talk to the leader about making plans for everyone. There are many, many camp friendly foods that are naturally gluten free. Walking tacos are a good one! Girl Scouts love hot dogs & s'mores. If there is an event like that, make arrangements for your DD to go first so her dog & marshmallow are not contaminated with the gluteny buns & graham crackers. Bring substitutes for this part if your DD is not keen on eating them solo. Mine will just eat a hot dog with no bun & roasted marshmallow's with a side of chocolate.

Breakfast is trickiest as the easiest things to serve for a crowd tend to be pasty based. Again, find out what they are serving and if there are comparable items to bring or if you can suggest a gluten-free recipe that wouldn't cost extra (budget is always a concern with scouts, but I have volunteered to supply my own gluten-free mixes for everyone just to make it easier to cook).

I can provide many campfire recipes if you need them. Just let me know!


Mom to 3 girls

DD1-diagnosed by allergist 10/2006

DD4 & DD9-diagnosed by Mom 01/2007

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I led Brownies and Guides years ago, before gluten free. As I remember our camps, most of the things we made would have been easily changed. And it would have been no problem to set up a small portable card table close by to prepare gluten free foods without contamination.

Hot dogs, hamburgers, bring your own buns of course, and check to see what is added to the burger meat. We never added anything as we had a girl allergic to wheat. You'll also need to bring a small tub of margarine well marked gluten free etc. But yes, the best thing to do is sit down with the people figuring out the menu.

Breakfast was for the most part, bacon and scrambled eggs and fruit. We didn't bother with toast or pancakes or anything like that.


Shirley

[save the Earth, It's the only planet with chocolate and wine.

It isn't about waiting for the storm to pass...

It's about learning to dance in the rain.

Gluten free since 1989

West Kootenay.... British Columbia

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I was a Boy Scout as a youth and had a life-changing experience in the program. I now serve on the board for the local scout council. Shortly after being diagnosed last November, I made the offer to volunteer to handle ANY food alergy or special needs campers at either of our two council camps. I deal with more than just gluten so I understand how things are. Our scouts and leaders pay money to attend our camps and that covers food. I do not want to have a scout bring his own hot dog buns or rice pasta, or whatever. It will take some effort and a little money, but all of the scouts at our camps will be able to eat every meal with his unit, granted special items or substitutions may be needed for the individual scout.

Like others have said, contact the people in charge, if they are not willing to work with you 100% call the Council Executive (I believe Girl Scouts have CEs too). Contact someone on their board, or tell me, I certainly know howo to get things done in a scout council and I will make it happen. If anyone needs a break from food planning and cooking, it's people with food alergies and special needs.

Good luck to you and let us know how it turns out.

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My son, Matt is celiac and diabetic, attended cubs for 3 yrs and is now in scouts. As others have said - talk to the leader. I was camp cook for the cub camps and we prepared lots of meals gluten free or I provided substitutes. the group was more than willing to work with me...for scouts, they are in patrols and plan their own menu - all members are keen on cooking gluten free for the weekends and making it fit his diabetes plan. The scout group paid for the gluten free pancake mix that I provided - I felt that it was important to do ALL pancakes gluten free so no risk of cross contamination - the kids all thgouht they were better than the pancakes they had at home.They made trail mix with chocolate chips or M & M's (gluten free in Canada).

All menus were worked out with me in attendance, I provided gluten free cereal for my son, we had ham and potatoes with fresh veges at one cub camp - leader had separate butter container set aside for Matt. Tin foil dinners are always a hit - gluten free meat (Grimms or Freybes are good) potatoes and carrot or other vege, onions - wrap it in tin foil and throw it on the fire.

Ask to be part of the menu planning, if pasta is on the menu - let them know you can provide rice pasta as long as it is cooked separately. The group should not have an issue with compensating you for costs of providing substitutes.

For smores - I made gluten free crispy rice squares - made them flat like a wafer and cut them into squares - they substitute for the graham cracker! So Matt didnt have to just stick with a marshmallow! He could eat a smore right along with everyone.

As a note : it is an excellent learning situation for all the members of the troup - learning about celiac, helping a fellow scout by making safe meals - the kids in our group have embraced the knowledge and it educates them about celiac (and diabetes).

Sandy


Sandy

Type 1 diabetes - 1986

hypothyroid -1993

pernicious anemia

premature atrial beats

neuropathy

retinopathy

daughter is: age 15

central hypotonia and developmental delay

balance issues (rides an adult 3 wheel bike)

hypothyroid 1996

dermatographia - a form of angioedema 2002

celiac 2004 - by endoscopy

diagnosed Aspergers at age 7 - responded very well (HUGE difference) to gluten-free diet

recovered from Kawasaki (2003)

lactose intolerant - figured out in Oct/06

Gilberts syndrome (April/07)

allergy to stinging insects

scoliosis Jan 2008

nightshade intolerance - figured out April 2008

allergy to Sulfa antibiotics

son is 13

type 1 diabetic - 2003 diagnosed on his 9th birthday

celiac - 2004 by endoscopy

lactose intolerant - figured out Nov/06

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Sandy,

Are M&Ms, chocolate chips, and smores on the diabetes food list in Canada? lol. Just kidding, I have type I also, no need to explain, I understand what you meant.

I think that is SO COOL that the troop/patrol has taken such an interest in your son's dietary needs. I can see how it becomes a learning experience for all. Thanks fo sharing.

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Are M&Ms, chocolate chips, and smores on the diabetes food list in Canada? lol. Just kidding, I have type I also, no need to explain, I understand what you meant.

LOL :lol:

I think that's why he likes scouts - they go on long hikes and go, go , go all day - Matt says scout camp is where he can have smores and not have to take extra insulin, then he beams a big smile! After one long day hike, they ended with a campfire and smores - he did his blood sugar when he got home and , I hear this whoop and a holler - MOM! I'm ONLY 6.6!!! All those diabetics understand moments like that, kinda like you "got away with it"

We have a special diabetes food list for scouts :D

Sandy


Sandy

Type 1 diabetes - 1986

hypothyroid -1993

pernicious anemia

premature atrial beats

neuropathy

retinopathy

daughter is: age 15

central hypotonia and developmental delay

balance issues (rides an adult 3 wheel bike)

hypothyroid 1996

dermatographia - a form of angioedema 2002

celiac 2004 - by endoscopy

diagnosed Aspergers at age 7 - responded very well (HUGE difference) to gluten-free diet

recovered from Kawasaki (2003)

lactose intolerant - figured out in Oct/06

Gilberts syndrome (April/07)

allergy to stinging insects

scoliosis Jan 2008

nightshade intolerance - figured out April 2008

allergy to Sulfa antibiotics

son is 13

type 1 diabetic - 2003 diagnosed on his 9th birthday

celiac - 2004 by endoscopy

lactose intolerant - figured out Nov/06

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I went on an overnight with my girl scout troop last year and I brought all my own food. I was an assistant leader and there was no way I was going to trust a bunch of nine-year-olds not to cross contaminate my salad! We did have access to a kitchen. I tried to bring similar food (like a sandwich for lunch rather than a sub). Didn't want to make the girls jealous that I had "better" food.


Gluten-Free since September 15, 2005.

Peanut-Free since July 2006.

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Thank you for all the great responses about G.S. camping gluten-free. I have spoken with the person from our service unit in charge of planning the trip. She was very cooperative and gave me the full menu. I found that many items could easily be substituted and Sat. dinner is baked chicken and rice!! Totally gluten-free. She also gave me the name and phone of the cook at the camp, so my next step is to call her and discuss access to the kitchen to prevent cross-contamination. Thanks for all the support!!

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