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hi,

The well known bone of contention, Oats! in your personal experience are ok for coeliacs or should they be avoided?

I'm not asking for my own benefit as i'm avoiding everything that has the slightest possibilty of causing me a problem! but my mother has some mysterious health problems that i personally believe are coelaics, it is genetic so if i have it and my dad is fine she might well have it too. I've been trying to convince her to go Gluten Free but i think shes holding back because she doesn't want to change her diet that much. Which brings me to oats, she admittably couldn't survive without her porridge in the morning and dislikes the alternatives, and i think if she could still have her porridge she'd be much happier about giving up the rest of her gluten.

Now i hear mixed reports on websites but i'm not sure what to believe so who amoung you can handle oats and who can't?

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Hi Rob:

As your mum to try "McCains Irish Steel Cut Oat" for her porridge"

They are grown in dedicated field and not subject to cross-contamination.

That should make her happy. :)


Lisa

Gluten Free - August 15, 2004

"Not all who wander are lost" - JRR Tolkien

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There is also one Canadian company, and one American company that has gluten free oats. However, they are pretty expensive.

If you are from Britian the Irish oats are your best bet :P


Shirley

[save the Earth, It's the only planet with chocolate and wine.

It isn't about waiting for the storm to pass...

It's about learning to dance in the rain.

Gluten free since 1989

West Kootenay.... British Columbia

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1) Pretty much all commercial oats, including McCanns, have been tested to be contaminated with wheat at levels above the 200ppm European CODEX standard. There are a few places, glutenfreeoats.com that are set up, throughout the whole process, to provide uncontaminated oats.

2) Even pure, lab grown oats, with no wheat contamination, cause intestinal damage in approximately 10% of celiac patients who appear to be sensitive to avenin, the oat protein which is structurally similar to the wheat protein gliadin. There is no production change that will change this and no way to test this is via a lab test.

Has she tried all the variations of cream of rice, cream of buckwheat, quinoa flakes, millet grits, and various combinations thereof? When made with some milk (or milk-alternative) and vanilla and cinnamon, they can be quite tasty, though the cooking time is definitely longer and a little different than oats.


Tiffany aka "Have I Mentioned Chocolate Lately?"

Inconclusive Blood Tests, Positive Dietary Results, No Endoscopy

G.F. - September 2003; C.F. - July 2004

Hiker, Yoga Teacher, Engineer, Painter, Be-er of Me

Bellevue, WA

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