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darlindeb25

From The Renegade Neurologist

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In a recent issue of Archives of Neurology (http://archneur.ama-assn.org), Mayo Clinic researchers reported a strong relationship between celiac disease and declining brain function. The authors described coincidental problems of both gastrointestinal as well as brain function in a surprisingly high number of individuals. Interestingly, in describing their patients they report,


Deb

Long Island, NY

Double DQ1, subtype 6

We urge all doctors to take time to listen to your patients.. don't "isolate" symptoms but look at the whole spectrum. If a patient tells you s/he feels as if s/he's falling apart and "nothing seems to be working properly", chances are s/he's right!

"The calm river of your life approaches the rocky chute of the rapids - flow on through. You are the same water. The rocks cannot hurt you. Remember, now and then, that you are the water and not the boat. Flow on!

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Celiac.com Sponsor (A8):

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Thanks so much for posting the link to this guy's blog. I'm really impressed with it, and I haven't even made my way down to the gluten article yet. :)


Catherine

Gluten Free Since 4/1/06 and feeling much nicer!

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I am definitely one taco short :blink: ... I went to this website and couldn't figure out what to look at ...

http://archneur.ama-assn.org .....................

Was I supposed to just go the other site ???

Copied in from renegade nuerologist site ...

Celiac disease, may in fact be the most common disease of mankind, affecting about 1% of humanity. It is generally described as being a chronic digestive disorder, caused by an increased sensitivity to gluten, a common protein found in wheat, barley, and rye. Typically, medical texts describe various gastrointestinal manifestations of this disease including malnutrition, a distended abdomen, and the passage of stools having a high fat content.

New research on celiac disease indicates that it can have a profound effect on the nervous system. In fact a physician in Great Britain, Dr. Maios Hadjivassiliou, who is a recognized world authority on gluten sensitivity, reported in the journal, The Lancet, that gluten sensitivity can actually be at times exclusively a neurological disease. That means that people can be showing symptoms of gluten sensitivity by having issues with brain function without any gastrointestinal problems whatsoever.

Researchers in Israel have described neurological problems in 51 percent of children with gluten sensitivity. They also have described a link between gluten sensitivity and attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Actually, the link between gluten sensitivity and problems with brain function, including learning disabilities, and even memory problems, is not that difficult to understand. Gluten sensitivity is caused by elevated levels of antibodies against a component of gluten called gliadin. This antibody (the antigliadin antibody) combines with gliadin when a person is exposed to any gluten-containing food like wheat, barley or rye.

When this happens, protein-specific genes are turned on in a special type of immune cell in the body. When these genes are turned on, inflammatory chemicals called cytokines are created. Cytokines, which are the chemical mediators of inflammation, are directly detrimental to brain function. In fact, elevated levels of cytokines are seen in such devastating conditions as Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, multiple sclerosis, and even autism. Essentially, the brain does not like inflammation and responds quite negatively to the presence of cytokines.

In a recent issue of Archives of Neurology (http://archneur.ama-assn.org), Mayo Clinic researchers reported a strong relationship between celiac disease and declining brain function. The authors described coincidental problems of both gastrointestinal as well as brain function in a surprisingly high number of individuals. Interestingly, in describing their patients they report, “… cognitive impairment associated with celiac disease was never the initial clinical diagnosis.” They further ask clinicians for “… a reevaluation of the role of celiac disease in causing cognitive impairment [as it] has the potential of expanding the narrow spectrum of treatable dementia.”

So the take home message, from a preventative perspective, is to ask your doctor to do a simple blood test for gluten sensitivity before you suspect you are one taco short of a combo platter.

marcia


Jan 1990 - Dx CFS/ME/FM (URI's, Ataxia, myoclonus, orthostatic hypotension, insomnia, brain fog, swollen lymph nodes, sore throat... ) Completely Disabled (housebound and bedridden at times)

2004 - Digestive pain all the time.

May 2004 - Hiatal hernia, erosive gastritis, gastroparesis (endoscopy)

August 2004 - Colon polyps, diverticulitus, internal hemorrhoids (colonoscopy)

No relief from Nexium, Prilosec, Protonix, Zelnorm, Miralax, Imodium, Lomotil ...

July 2005 - GP recommended WFDFSFEFCF + vegan (Also, anything that hurts free)

Immediately stopped needing naps and digestive pain reduced.

Sept 2005 - GFDFCFSFEF + chemical free - Immediately stopped feeling jittery / buzzing and digestive issues were much better.

June 2006 - Dx B12 and iron deficient. Started B12 injections and using cast iron pan.

August 2006 - MYOCLONUS GONE. (off Klonopin)

September 2006 - ATAXIA, INSOMNIA and Feeling like the floor was moving under my feet gone.

June 19, 2007 - Positive DQ2, Dx Celiac

October 2007 - Sleeping like a baby, waking up with energy, but still having fatigue/stamina issues

Nov 2007 - Started Paleo diet for chronic hypoglycemia

April 2008 - GTT normal. I'm no longer hypoglycemic. Started Low oxalate diet for kidney stones.

May 1, 2008 - Began salt loading for OI/NMH - noticed immediately muscle weakness was gone. I was sodium deficient but my labs don't reflect it. Still working on OI and PEM.

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Thanks for posting that. I have had lots of neurological symptoms. Bad memory, confused, brain fog, depression, anxiety. I felt like Beeker in the Muppet Show. Still do sometimes.


One Celiac gene and one gluten intolerance gene (HLA-DQ 2,1).

Grain free, casein free, soy/legume free + a bunch of allergies I have had since I was a child (stone fruits, nuts..carrots)

Following the Specific Carbohydrate Diet, but no nuts, legumes or casein.

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Thanks for posting that (love the one taco short of combo platter :P ). I definitely think that there is much more to celiac than some know. I've always been surprised that we are just treated by GI's since for many of us there are neuro manifestations. I always thought that celiac should have a team approach in treatment

.


***************************

Beverly

Gluten free since 2005

In the midst of winter, I found there was within me an invincible summer.

Albert Careb

36_35_6[1].gif

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I am definitely one taco short :blink: ... I went to this website and couldn't figure out what to look at ...

http://archneur.ama-assn.org .....................

Was I supposed to just go the other site ???

Copied in from renegade nuerologist site ...

Celiac disease, may in fact be the most common disease of mankind, affecting about 1% of humanity. It is generally described as being a chronic digestive disorder, caused by an increased sensitivity to gluten, a common protein found in wheat, barley, and rye. Typically, medical texts describe various gastrointestinal manifestations of this disease including malnutrition, a distended abdomen, and the passage of stools having a high fat content.

New research on celiac disease indicates that it can have a profound effect on the nervous system. In fact a physician in Great Britain, Dr. Maios Hadjivassiliou, who is a recognized world authority on gluten sensitivity, reported in the journal, The Lancet, that gluten sensitivity can actually be at times exclusively a neurological disease. That means that people can be showing symptoms of gluten sensitivity by having issues with brain function without any gastrointestinal problems whatsoever.

Researchers in Israel have described neurological problems in 51 percent of children with gluten sensitivity. They also have described a link between gluten sensitivity and attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Actually, the link between gluten sensitivity and problems with brain function, including learning disabilities, and even memory problems, is not that difficult to understand. Gluten sensitivity is caused by elevated levels of antibodies against a component of gluten called gliadin. This antibody (the antigliadin antibody) combines with gliadin when a person is exposed to any gluten-containing food like wheat, barley or rye.

When this happens, protein-specific genes are turned on in a special type of immune cell in the body. When these genes are turned on, inflammatory chemicals called cytokines are created. Cytokines, which are the chemical mediators of inflammation, are directly detrimental to brain function. In fact, elevated levels of cytokines are seen in such devastating conditions as Alzheimer


28 yr old Male

Diagnosed Celiac in February 2007

Gluten-free/Casein Free

HLA DQ 2,3 Subtype (2,8) I have both celiac genes!

Married

1 child 9 months- Levi

Yeast/Bacteria overgrowth

" CHANGE THE WAY YOU LOOK AT THINGS AND THE THINGS YOU LOOK AT CHANGE"

Wayne Dyer

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mtndog I agree with you, it should be a team approach, not only GI and Neuro docs but also Endos, celiac has a tendency to mess with these things too [diabetes, thyroid] but I think we're very far from that right now, if we approached a doctor with that idea I think we would pretty much be laughed at unfortunately.

I have many neurological problems of unknown cause which, so far, have all been linked to Celiac by studies, it frustrates me so much that doctors can be so ignorant about such an important development! If doctors started putting attention to Celiac it would be a HUGE breakthrough for medicine, but I guess they don't want to deal with a disease which has such an easy solution because otherwise they couldn't pump us full of drugs through all of our lives until we take the matters into our own hands.

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