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Guhlia

For Parents With Small Children...

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Let me start by saying, she is fine! There was no major damage done. I just wanted to share this with everyone so it doesn't happen to anyone else. We were in Florida this past week staying at a hotel with a swimming pool. In order to get to the pool we had to go down a floor in the elevator. We were getting ready to go swimming last Monday and Tori (my two year old daughter) was getting really fussy because it was taking everyone so long to get ready. She threw a fit when I tried to put her shoes on, so I just skipped it. No one else was wearing shoes in the elevator, so I figured I wouldn't force her this time. It just wasn't worth the fight. When we got to the elevator she charged at the open door as it was closing. It closed on her and drug her toes down into the tracks and the door closed over them. We managed to get the door open again, though we weren't sure we were going to be able to. Her toes were bleeding badly and we weren't sure for quite some time if she was going to have any permanent damage. Anyway, she IS fine and we ended up not having to take her to the ER for stitches. She's recovering well and was able to enjoy the rest of her vacation. We were very lucky that she didn't lose any toes. I just wanted to share my story with all of you. Please, if you have young children, make them wear shoes on elevators and escalators! I would hate to hear that this happened to someone else. Having your kid screaming at the top of her lungs while literally stuck in an elevator track is NOT fun.


~Angie~

Gluten free since May 2004

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Oh my gosh Angie--I'm so glad you prefaced your story by saying she is fine! The poor little thing--she must have been so scared--good news that she didn't require stiches and was able to enjoy the rest of the vacation.

Thanks for the warning--one thing I remember from when my boys were little is it only takes one second for something like that to happen, no matter how careful you are.


Patti

"Life is what happens while you're busy making other plans"

"When people show you who they are, believe them"--Maya Angelou

"Bloom where you are planted"--Bev

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Let me start by saying, she is fine! There was no major damage done. I just wanted to share this with everyone so it doesn't happen to anyone else. We were in Florida this past week staying at a hotel with a swimming pool. In order to get to the pool we had to go down a floor in the elevator. We were getting ready to go swimming last Monday and Tori (my two year old daughter) was getting really fussy because it was taking everyone so long to get ready. She threw a fit when I tried to put her shoes on, so I just skipped it. No one else was wearing shoes in the elevator, so I figured I wouldn't force her this time. It just wasn't worth the fight. When we got to the elevator she charged at the open door as it was closing. It closed on her and drug her toes down into the tracks and the door closed over them. We managed to get the door open again, though we weren't sure we were going to be able to. Her toes were bleeding badly and we weren't sure for quite some time if she was going to have any permanent damage. Anyway, she IS fine and we ended up not having to take her to the ER for stitches. She's recovering well and was able to enjoy the rest of her vacation. We were very lucky that she didn't lose any toes. I just wanted to share my story with all of you. Please, if you have young children, make them wear shoes on elevators and escalators! I would hate to hear that this happened to someone else. Having your kid screaming at the top of her lungs while literally stuck in an elevator track is NOT fun.

How scary, Angie! I'm glad she's okay. Elevators and escalators can be dangerous. I remember when my eldest was a toddler and he had his hand on the door of the elevator at our condo...when the doors opened his fingers got pulled into the wall...pretty scary, and very lucky he wasn't seriously hurt (though it did hurt a lot!) Accidents can happen so quickly!

Michelle

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Yeah... Only a second... I felt so guilty for not forcing her to put her shoes on. I probably should have known better than to let her walk around without shoes on. I'm just so relieved that she's okay. There was about half an hour where we weren't sure. It was bleeding badly enough that we couldn't tell if all of her toe was there. Then, when the bleeding slowed, we couldn't get her to move her toes so we weren't sure if she broke any. It was definitely NOT the highlight of my vacation.

My avatar pic was taken after the elevator incident. She doesn't look too traumatized! :)


~Angie~

Gluten free since May 2004

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I'm so glad she's okay! So scary when those things happen!

On Escalators - even with shoes on, I have heard about little ones who had shoelaces dangling that got snagged between steps.

You did what most mothers would do - your on vacation, the kid is kicking up a fit cause they want to get to the pool.....where you have to take the shoes off anyway.... I would have done the same as you.

Take care of you and the wounded toes.

Sandy


Sandy

Type 1 diabetes - 1986

hypothyroid -1993

pernicious anemia

premature atrial beats

neuropathy

retinopathy

daughter is: age 15

central hypotonia and developmental delay

balance issues (rides an adult 3 wheel bike)

hypothyroid 1996

dermatographia - a form of angioedema 2002

celiac 2004 - by endoscopy

diagnosed Aspergers at age 7 - responded very well (HUGE difference) to gluten-free diet

recovered from Kawasaki (2003)

lactose intolerant - figured out in Oct/06

Gilberts syndrome (April/07)

allergy to stinging insects

scoliosis Jan 2008

nightshade intolerance - figured out April 2008

allergy to Sulfa antibiotics

son is 13

type 1 diabetic - 2003 diagnosed on his 9th birthday

celiac - 2004 by endoscopy

lactose intolerant - figured out Nov/06

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OMG Angie! I am so glad there was no permanent damage! As a mother of four, I know exactly just how easily things like this can happen!

I remember watching the news one day and a child who was on an escalator had their foot too close to the edge of the step, up against the wall part, and their shoe jammed in-between the step and the wall and almost ripped their foot off. To this day, when I have the kids on escalators, I insist they stay in the middle!

Hugs.

Karen


Karen

positive bloodwork, positive biopsy

Celiac, collagenous colitis, hypothyroidism

endometriosis (at age 20)

spinal stenosis (early 20's)

Biopsy August 2006 confirmed complete villous atrophy despite being gluten-free for years and bloodwork within range showing compliance with diet. Doctor has confirmed diagnosis of Refractory Celiac Sprue.

Endoscopy also showed numerous stomach ulcers, have started taking Losec.

Mother to Eileen 13 yrs

Rhiannon 8 yrs

Daniel & Connor 6 yr twin boys......

"Joyfulness keeps the heart and face young. A good laugh makes us better friends with ourselves and everybody around us."

Orison Swett Marden

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"An optimist laughs to forget. A pessimist forgets to laugh."

Tom Nansbury

"Doctor to patient: I have good news and bad news. The good news is that you are not a hypochondriac."

Unknown

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Man, and my husband already thinks I'm neurotic about escalators. I don't know why, but they freak me out. I guess it's because of all the emphasis my parents put on being careful on them. I really hate using them. I use stairs whenever possible.


~Angie~

Gluten free since May 2004

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Guest cassidy

How scary! Glad she is ok.

When I was little my shoe lace got caught in an escalator. I was ok but it took a while to get it out and it was at the top and people kept trying to get off while we were getting my shoe lace out. I also had someone in front of me get their umbrella stuck at the bottom and it was hard to get off when they were trying to get it out. I have been freaked out about escalators ever since and rarely use them. I never realized that could happen in an elevator.

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((hugs)) - I'm so glad that your dd is ok!!


Mom of:

Carleigh~ 10 years old, allergic to wheat, milk, peanuts, strawberries, and many EAs. She is currently soy-light and egg-light ~ celiac testing inconclusive by allergist.

Gluten-Free since 10/05 She's a gymnast. : )

Nick ~ 13 years old with no known allergies.

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You know as a non parent it never ceases to amaze me how parents try and be perfect....

I think you loose something when you become a parent although you obviously gain much more more...:D

Anyway my own dear mom laments this and that, she apoligises for this that and the other... accusing me of being a hypochondriac when I was undiagnosed was actually the only one that hurt!

I was was such a complete ***tard she flipped and through a cardboard salt pot at me... then made me clean it up...

and she apologised for me being a complete idiot...

You know all that matters is your LOVE....

If the worst had happened and she had lost a toe.... missed a vacation etc. it all heals with time and you are already giving her the most important gift a mother can give...

So everyone, yes be careful out there but if the unexpected happens it happens and i still maintain the biggest thing you have is your unconditional LOVE ! Now you just made me phone my MOM.... I don't do it half often enough!


Fere libenter homines id quod volunt credunt. (JC, De Bello Gallico Liber III/XVIII)

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I saw a sign at the paediatrician's office a while back:

Accidents are predictable and preventable.

It's very true. Rarely is there an "accident" that couldn't have been avoided if we took preventative measures. That said, you really can't control another person (even your own kids) and sometimes our judgement calls aren't perfect. All you can do is do your best to avoid injury, and try to teach your kids to be mindful and careful.

Michelle

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I am so glad to hear Tory is doing better. How scary that must have been. I am glad to hear the rest of the vacation went well and everyone made it home ok.


~~~~Gluten Free since 9/2004~~~~~~

Friends may come and go but Sillies are Forever!!!!!!!

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I'm glad this turned out good in the end. I would have done the same thing. I mean, you are going to the pool anyway, so what's the point of putting shoes on :blink: . However I will be more careful in elevators next time.

I think you loose something when you become a parent

Of course you loose something. Your sanity! ;)

Hugs, Stef


Stef

Next goals:

Results for 2011:

1x PA State Champ (I defended my title in pointfighting) and also again Grand Champion in pointfighting

August 20-27: Karate and Kickboxing World Championships in Germany (my homecountry)

gluten-free since 07/21/2004

Shermans Dale, PA

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Accidents are predictable and preventable

:unsure: not sure about that - with kids, yes its predicatble that when they start to walk - they will fall.....when they start to eat - they will choke........when they ride abike they will fall off of it..

my daughter tripped on the sidewalk once and hit the sidewalk face first, horrible nosebleed big patch of blood on the sidewalk......... how I could have predicted that one, I do not know, the only way I could have prevented it is to keep her home :huh:

Again , glad she's okay..

Sandy


Sandy

Type 1 diabetes - 1986

hypothyroid -1993

pernicious anemia

premature atrial beats

neuropathy

retinopathy

daughter is: age 15

central hypotonia and developmental delay

balance issues (rides an adult 3 wheel bike)

hypothyroid 1996

dermatographia - a form of angioedema 2002

celiac 2004 - by endoscopy

diagnosed Aspergers at age 7 - responded very well (HUGE difference) to gluten-free diet

recovered from Kawasaki (2003)

lactose intolerant - figured out in Oct/06

Gilberts syndrome (April/07)

allergy to stinging insects

scoliosis Jan 2008

nightshade intolerance - figured out April 2008

allergy to Sulfa antibiotics

son is 13

type 1 diabetic - 2003 diagnosed on his 9th birthday

celiac - 2004 by endoscopy

lactose intolerant - figured out Nov/06

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:unsure: not sure about that - with kids, yes its predicatble that when they start to walk - they will fall.....when they start to eat - they will choke........when they ride abike they will fall off of it..

my daughter tripped on the sidewalk once and hit the sidewalk face first, horrible nosebleed big patch of blood on the sidewalk......... how I could have predicted that one, I do not know, the only way I could have prevented it is to keep her home :huh:

Again , glad she's okay..

Sandy

Except when they start to walk (or learn any new skills), it's up to caregivers to provide safe places for them to test out their new abilities. When they start to eat, it's up to caregivers to choose the appropriate timing and foods for safe eating. When kids explore their world, it's up to caregivers to provide childproof/child-friendly surroundings.

There is an interesting survey/study that was done to find out the public's interpretation of the word accident:

http://ip.bmj.com/cgi/content/full/5/1/19

A bit of info from the link:

Keywords: accident; public; national survey; terminology

North American injury control professionals eschew the word accident. They believe it reinforces public misconceptions that injuries cannot be predicted or prevented, or that injuries are controlled by fate. This concern has been raised by numerous leaders of the modern injury prevention movement:

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I agree, my post was kind of tongue in cheek, and when my daughter fell, she was 10 yrs old, not a toddler. She also had sensory issues with her mouth so I had to be doubly cautious about food - or she would choke.

She banged her cheek once and had bruise...she did this while walking in a special walker when she was 3yr old(the kind used by handicapped kids - not Toys R Us variety). the physiotherapist was on one side and I on the other, , she lost her center of balance and bang - into the handle,. could it have been prevented - likely with padding on the handle or if the physiotherapist had 3 hands because she was rescusng the "bottom half" when the leg buckled and i was holding the walker steady.

I only wanted to let the OP know she was not alone, she obviously learned from it and wanted to share it with us so no one else had it happen to them.

Sandy

*and if this post sounds defensive - probably is, I am trying to keep things lighthearted because while accidents might be preventable - immune mediated disease isnt and my daughter is currently undergoing a battery of test for autoimmune hepatitis......... so... I just wanted to help "moms" know, yes of course use common sense but be prepared for things like falling toddlers etc. If they fall, its not your fault , if they fall into glass coffee table that smashes - then yes that was preventable.


Sandy

Type 1 diabetes - 1986

hypothyroid -1993

pernicious anemia

premature atrial beats

neuropathy

retinopathy

daughter is: age 15

central hypotonia and developmental delay

balance issues (rides an adult 3 wheel bike)

hypothyroid 1996

dermatographia - a form of angioedema 2002

celiac 2004 - by endoscopy

diagnosed Aspergers at age 7 - responded very well (HUGE difference) to gluten-free diet

recovered from Kawasaki (2003)

lactose intolerant - figured out in Oct/06

Gilberts syndrome (April/07)

allergy to stinging insects

scoliosis Jan 2008

nightshade intolerance - figured out April 2008

allergy to Sulfa antibiotics

son is 13

type 1 diabetic - 2003 diagnosed on his 9th birthday

celiac - 2004 by endoscopy

lactose intolerant - figured out Nov/06

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I agree, my post was kind of tongue in cheek, and when my daughter fell, she was 10 yrs old, not a toddler. She also had sensory issues with her mouth so I had to be doubly cautious about food - or she would choke.

She banged her cheek once and had bruise...she did this while walking in a special walker (the kid used by handicapped kids - not Toys R Us variety). the physiotherapist was on one side and I on the other, , she lost her center of balance and bang - into the handle,. could it have been prevented - likely with padding on the handle or if the physiotherapist had 3 hands because she was rescusng the "bottom half" when the leg buckled and i was holding the walker steady.

I only wanted to let the OP know she was not alone, she obviously learned from it and wanted to share it with us so no one else had it happen to them.

Sandy

*and if this post sounds defensive - probably is, I am trying to keep things lighthearted because while accidents might be preventable - immune mediated disease isnt and my daughter is currently undergoing a battery of test for autoimmune hepatitis......... so... I just wanted to help "moms" know, yes of course use common sense but be prepared for things like falling toddlers etc. If they fall, its not your fault , if they fall into glass coffee table that smashes - then yes that was preventable.

I certainly wasn't trying to put you on the defensive, and wasn't making a judgment about anybody. Hey, I've got three kids...one of whom is especially "accident" (or should I say "injury") prone (the one who happened to get his fingers stuck in the elevator door...which I tried to prevent, but wasn't moving fast enough.) As I said earlier, you can't control other people. I still think that the sign I saw makes an interesting (and true) statement. :)

Michelle

BTW, as an fellow Canadian, I'm sure you know that the old-fashioned baby variety of walkers (not the physical therapy kind) are banned for sale and use in Canada...the powers that be are the ones trying to prevent injuries (ie predictable & preventable accidents) in that regard. :D

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You know as a non parent it never ceases to amaze me how parents try and be perfect....

Funny that you mention that... It's probably because of signs like the one Michelle posted that she saw in her pediatricians office. Parents are constantly being judged by everyone around them, including their own parents and family. It makes it hard NOT to try to be perfect. That being said, I know I'm far from perfect and my daughter loves me just how I am. :)

Thanks for all the kind words.


~Angie~

Gluten free since May 2004

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Funny that you mention that... It's probably because of signs like the one Michelle posted that she saw in her pediatricians office. Parents are constantly being judged by everyone around them, including their own parents and family. It makes it hard NOT to try to be perfect. That being said, I know I'm far from perfect and my daughter loves me just how I am. :)

Thanks for all the kind words.

I think I felt like a worse parent after reading the poster (at the paediatrician's office) about never, ever, ever having a trampoline at home...how they are always unsafe and lead to injury. We'd already bought one. Hope I'll never have to hear the accident prevention lecture for letting the kids use it! :unsure:

Michelle

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Michelle, pediatricians are horrible about scaring you and making you feel guilty, aren't they?!?!?! It's like we don't feel guilty enough when our kids get hurt. Do we really need them to add insult to injury? I understand they're just trying to prevent accidents, but come on...


~Angie~

Gluten free since May 2004

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Michelle, pediatricians are horrible about scaring you and making you feel guilty, aren't they?!?!?! It's like we don't feel guilty enough when our kids get hurt. Do we really need them to add insult to injury? I understand they're just trying to prevent accidents, but come on...

Trying to prevent accidents is of course good but to say all accidents is preventable isn't true... if your driving along the highway and a passing plane engine falls on your car then this was so far out of your control its silly to worry about.

The point is you simply cannot cover every possible accident that might possibly happen, you have to draw a sensible limit and use judgement. A child falling on kitchen knives left point up in a open dishwasher is obviously easily preventable, the child finding a chair, opening the dishwasher and taking out a knife and hurting themself is beyond planning....

Children are resourceful little tykes... I know I was one... I have my share of scars and broken bones I had my share of moments but I can't look back and say my mom should've protected me, in most cases I made a big effort to be a brat and defeat her attempts at safety...


Fere libenter homines id quod volunt credunt. (JC, De Bello Gallico Liber III/XVIII)

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I have 5 grown kids now and yes, they had lots and lots of "accidents". Accidents happen, we can't stop them from happening, that's why they are called accidents. My kids used to get hurt just playing. One summer the ER knew us on a first name basis, I was afraid they would think I was abusing my kids. One of them said, "Honey, don't you worry, your kids tell us what happens and we can tell they are telling the truth and their stories are so funny!" One time, my youngest was riding his bike and had a rope tied to the oldest, Jeremy is 7 years older and when he decided he was done playing, he stopped moving. Well, of course Joe fell off the bike and broke his thumb! Stupid yes, but still an accident--Jeremy had no intention of hurting Joe. Holly and Nick were wrestling in the back yard and Nick sprained his ankle, another time, Holly broke her thumb. Accidents happen. When kids do something, they are not planning on getting hurt, they just do. We can't prevent these things. We can't stand over our kids 24 hours a day. Two of my sons became football players and I hated it, but they loved it. Nick was also a basketball player. We have had sprained ankles, messed up knees, broken tailbone, concussion, one son spray painted his face--you name it, they have done it.

That's why most of us have kids when we are young!!!!!!!! Now I watch my kids going through the same things with their kids! What goes around, comes around! :P Enjoy them!


Deb

Long Island, NY

Double DQ1, subtype 6

We urge all doctors to take time to listen to your patients.. don't "isolate" symptoms but look at the whole spectrum. If a patient tells you s/he feels as if s/he's falling apart and "nothing seems to be working properly", chances are s/he's right!

"The calm river of your life approaches the rocky chute of the rapids - flow on through. You are the same water. The rocks cannot hurt you. Remember, now and then, that you are the water and not the boat. Flow on!

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Trying to prevent accidents is of course good but to say all accidents is preventable isn't true... if your driving along the highway and a passing plane engine falls on your car then this was so far out of your control its silly to worry about.

The accident would have been out of the car driver's control, but not out of the control of the airline...the airplane falling out the of the sky would have been prevetable with proper maintenance, a sober pilot, etc. ;)

The point is you simply cannot cover every possible accident that might possibly happen, you have to draw a sensible limit and use judgement. A child falling on kitchen knives left point up in a open dishwasher is obviously easily preventable, the child finding a chair, opening the dishwasher and taking out a knife and hurting themself is beyond planning....
I don't agree there. Keeping knives out of reach would be the way to prevent that injury...it's a childproofing issue. But I understand your point. And that's where the inability to control other people comes into play. You can predict and prevent many accidents, especially for yourself.

Children are resourceful little tykes... I know I was one... I have my share of scars and broken bones I had my share of moments but I can't look back and say my mom should've protected me, in most cases I made a big effort to be a brat and defeat her attempts at safety...

It's also a learning experience. Once you have an injury from a particular action, then you (hopefully) learn how to predict and prevent it happening again to you. You can then try to impart that wisdom to your own child(ren). Whether they take and use that advice is really up to them. :)

Michelle

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