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Does Anyone Have Hypoglycemia Along With Their Celiac?

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I've been a Celiac my whole life but I was just diagnosed with hypoglycemia a few months ago and all of my delicious, wonderful, sugary wheat-free cookies, cakes, etc. have been stripped from my diet. :( I LOVE sugar! I would continue to eat it and just say, "Screw hypoglycemia" except that when my blood sugar goes crazy while I'm running (I run cross country, indoor track, and outdoor track) I pass out.

Anyways, I'm not really sure what the purpose of this post is: but if anyone's hypoglycemic - leave me a comment!

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Im afraid I dont know very much about hypoglycemia but I often did wonder might my son be a sufferer. He is celiac but sometimes when he hasnt eaten he just loses it... gets very cross and irritable. .... anyway, isnt hypoglycemia somehow related to diabetes? and isnt celiac carried on the diabetes gene? Sorry this is a very unhelpful post just asking you questions instead of helping out... apologies... but it made me think!

Best of luck - someone with more to say will probably post soon.

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Yup, I have hypoglycemia. I haven't cut out sweets, but just limit the amount I eat. I tend to be a grazer also, I pretty much snack my way through the day. I only have issues if I don't eat for awhile.

-Laurie

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I've been a Celiac my whole life but I was just diagnosed with hypoglycemia a few months ago and all of my delicious, wonderful, sugary wheat-free cookies, cakes, etc. have been stripped from my diet. :( I LOVE sugar! I would continue to eat it and just say, "Screw hypoglycemia" except that when my blood sugar goes crazy while I'm running (I run cross country, indoor track, and outdoor track) I pass out.

Anyways, I'm not really sure what the purpose of this post is: but if anyone's hypoglycemic - leave me a comment!

my life has been just the opposite of yours :P....i was dx'ed w/ hypoglycemia about 15 years ago, when i was a kid. just found out about the celiac 6 months ago. it's tough committing to a lifestyle change. i admit i do have a serious weakness for chocolate. but what i've learned is that you have to have balance in your diet. i don't eat any sweets unless i've eaten some protein and carbs first. that helps cushion the sugar when you consume it. it also helps you to be less hungry when eating sweets. i'm also a grazer, i'll eat something every couple of hours, so as to keep my blood sugar levels stable. you don't have to cut out all sugar, just be careful how much you do eat, and make sure you're eating very healthy foods as well. there are some good posts on here from hypoglycemics about what foods to eat if you need help, just search for them. :) you can ask us anything, we're happy to help.

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I was diagnosed with hypoglycemia before celiac. Changing my diet to help my blood sugar made a huge difference in my health. I thought I would miss the extra breads, cereals, things that I used to eat way too much of, but I didn't miss them at all. I felt so good for a change that it was worth it.

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I have had hypoglycemia for years - and it's completely controlled by diet. I eat several smaller meals, lots of veggies and moderate amount of meats, and low on carbs (well, most of the time).

Sometimes I get very hungry in an hour or so after eating and so I eat again. I'm not governed by the clock.

Occasionally I don't get hungry and "forget" to eat, and before I know it I'm in a daze and/or irritable. When my blood sugar drops like this it takes about 20-30 minutes after eating to normalize, and sometimes longer, so I try not to let this happen. Drinking some fruit or vegetable juice followed by protein is helpful to quickly raise the blood sugar level.

I used to carry a small plastic container with one serving of protein powder that I could add water to, shake and drink, when I needed it. It was real convenient. It also helped to have the protein powder immediately after getting up in the morning. (Can't have any protein powder now because of other food allergies - darn!)

You'll get the hang of it in no time. As was mentioned before, you'll want to be eating a more healthy diet anyway.

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Im afraid I dont know very much about hypoglycemia but I often did wonder might my son be a sufferer. He is celiac but sometimes when he hasnt eaten he just loses it... gets very cross and irritable. .... anyway, isnt hypoglycemia somehow related to diabetes? and isnt celiac carried on the diabetes gene? Sorry this is a very unhelpful post just asking you questions instead of helping out... apologies... but it made me think!

Best of luck - someone with more to say will probably post soon.

Hypoglycemia is most often related to diabetes but there are a lot of cases where it has nothing to do with diabetes - I guess your body just reacts crazily to sugar.

Thanks everyone! I just became a member of this website yesterday when I stumbled across it while doing research for a paper on celiac disease and boy - I wish I had known about this earlier! ;)

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Laymen's definitions:

Hypoglycemia - the pancreas secretes too much insulin and so it "eats up" all the sugars in the blood too quickly. Blood sugar level goes too low. Pancreas is out of wack - may eventually give out and then one has diabetes.

Diabetes - the pancreas doesn't secrete enough insulin, or none at all, and the sugar in the blood doesn't get digested.

Hypoglycemia doesn't have to develop into diabetes. By limiting the sugars eaten, and thereby not stimulating the pancreas to over react and make too much insulin all the time, one can theoretically avoid wearing the organ out.

Diet considerations:

Starches convert immediately to sugars when digested. So you need to limit simple starches like flours (there goes the breads). Whole grains are broken down more slowly so they are preferred.

Carbohydrates that are "locked up" in fiber are digested more slowly and don't trigger vast amounts of insulin to be secreted - that's usually vegetables, and less sweet fruits like Granny Smith apples and melons.

Sweet vegetables, like carrots and tomatoes, have more natural sugar in them. Raw veggies have more useful fiber than cooked.

Fruits have a lot of natural sugars and should not be eaten alone without some protein.

Juices, fruit or vegetable, are like concentrated sugar water.

Fats and protein sources digest more slowly and don't trigger high insulin.

So.... if you have a pizza, go light on the sauce, and heavy on the meats and veggies (and cheese unless your watching fatsj).

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Laymen's definitions:

Hypoglycemia - the pancreas secretes too much insulin and so it "eats up" all the sugars in the blood too quickly. Blood sugar level goes too low. Pancreas is out of wack - may eventually give out and then one has diabetes.

Diabetes - the pancreas doesn't secrete enough insulin, or none at all, and the sugar in the blood doesn't get digested.

Hypoglycemia doesn't have to develop into diabetes. By limiting the sugars eaten, and thereby not stimulating the pancreas to over react and make too much insulin all the time, one can theoretically avoid wearing the organ out.

Diet considerations:

Starches convert immediately to sugars when digested. So you need to limit simple starches like flours (there goes the breads). Whole grains are broken down more slowly so they are preferred.

Carbohydrates that are "locked up" in fiber are digested more slowly and don't trigger vast amounts of insulin to be secreted - that's usually vegetables, and less sweet fruits like Granny Smith apples and melons.

Sweet vegetables, like carrots and tomatoes, have more natural sugar in them. Raw veggies have more useful fiber than cooked.

Fruits have a lot of natural sugars and should not be eaten alone without some protein.

Juices, fruit or vegetable, are like concentrated sugar water.

Fats and protein sources digest more slowly and don't trigger high insulin.

So.... if you have a pizza, go light on the sauce, and heavy on the meats and veggies (and cheese unless your watching fatsj).

great summary of the diet!

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My doc's ahve never addressed me about it, but I have noticed for years that my BGL is always just under 70. I have brought it up and the doc's just shrug it off.

So if you hear anything please let me know.

Jacqui

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Right now I am reading a book called "Adrenal Fatigue, The 21st Century Stress Syndrome" by James L. Wilson, N.D., D.C., Ph.D.

He says that people with hypoglycemia usually have some degree of adrenal fatigue. I certainly have severe adrenal fatigue, as well as a low functioning thyroid and hypoglycemia.

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I've been hypoglycemic ALL MY LIFE... I wish I made the connection with gluten intolerance sooner. :( The only way I can manage it is by diet. See my signature.

Flowergirl

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Never heard of hypoglimisya.... what ever... but my sis is diabetic. sounds hard... but she has to be diabetic because of the celiac gene, cuz we don't have a diabetes gene in my fam. on either side.. period.

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I was told I was hypoglycemic two years ago. Since I cut wheat, I have not had a sugar crash. The Celiac is turning out easier to deal with than the hypoglycemia was, because you just eliminate gluten. With hypoglycemia, you have to balance sugar in your system.

The first few weeks are hard, but try replacing sugary snacks with fruit or soy crisps. they are yummy and healthy, and both are great for your condition. Talking to a nutritionist can help, too. After a while, your body actually adjusts its cravings and tastes so that eating sugary snacks and sodas is not at all appealing.

Good luck from a former hypoglycemic!

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I think I'm discovering I'm a hypoglycemic. I just bought a glucose monitor out of curiousity. I eat a very low GI diet (no starches and sugars except maybe a couple times a month). I just tested myself after getting home from work and my glucose level was 58! I had 1 oz of almonds about 90 minutes before.

I don't get the classic symptoms of hypoglycemia I just get very sleepy. But I used to, before I adopted my no-starch/no-sugar diet.

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Yep. I don't avoid all sugar, just make sure that my diet is regularly balanced. Then I can afford a cookie here and there.

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Yes and I read a great excerpt from the dummy's guide to hypoglycemia the other day at the book store. it said that gluten intolerance was the most common allergy in hypoglycemics. found that very interesting.

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Guest wanaenjoylife

i was diagnosed with hypoglycemia a little while ago and am being tested for celiac...even though im almost 100% sure i have it. almonds are reallly great. I too LOVE SUGAR, but just eat limited amounts with protein and it helps. I blacked out in class the other day bcuz i didnt have any gluten-free food with me and was starving. it was awful. but just keep some sort of protein with you and it also helps with the sugar cravings. email me if you want to talk

knshore@hotmail.com

aim sn: knsgoestonz511

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I have just found this Forum and find it VERY interesting. I ahev not been diagnosed with Celiac or Hypo but have been having major problems for 2 years now and after about 50k worth of tests the doctors are still lost.

I have self-diagnosed myself with Gluten problems even though my celiac tests were negative. Bascially if I stay away from Gluten I am lot better. However, I have begun having "episodes" that consist of my blood sugar plumeting. We have a Glocometer and it drops quickly and then recovers after about 10 minutes after the episode begins. It has been anywhere from 17 at the height of an attack to 70 as I begin to feel a little better.

I have been to four Gastroentergologists and now am going to see one who specializes in Oddi Sphincter Dysfunction but from what I have seen on this Board I have every single symptom of Celiacs Disease and Hypo together.

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Right now I am reading a book called "Adrenal Fatigue, The 21st Century Stress Syndrome" by James L. Wilson, N.D., D.C., Ph.D.

He says that people with hypoglycemia usually have some degree of adrenal fatigue. I certainly have severe adrenal fatigue, as well as a low functioning thyroid and hypoglycemia.

I just read this and am trying to find out more about the symptoms of adrenal fatigue. I have been gluten free for 7 months now. I have severe panic attacks and we though getting rid of gluten and refined sugar may help. Lately I have been getting the weirdest headaches and I can't figure out if it's hypoglycemia or something different. It usually starts over one eye and then I get tunnel vision and get really nauseous. I get really shaky and can't seem to stop shaking. I eat wen this happens and it seems to help most of the time. I really don't understand what is happening so if anyone has ever had anything like this I'd love some feedback.

Thanks

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Yes I've been this way since a teenager. I don't have time to read the reply's right now just wanted to say yes its a real problem for me and I do much better on a low carb, small frequent meal diet.

Gail

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Guest sru_gal_8504

i am not a teen. i am 22. sorry i know it says for teens only. but i have borderline hypogylcemia.

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Hi, know this thread is old but anyway, I'm a medical student in Belfast and was just researching a case I saw last week with hypoglycemic episodes secondary to celiac disease and came across this board. After investigations (including a 72hr fast) all other possible causes of these episodes were ruled out. It turned out he was not strictly adhereing to his gluten-free diet. Furthermore, he also engaged in heavy frequent exercise, and heavy exercise is associated with hypoglycemic episodes. I noticed the original poster mentions she runs (alot I imagine) and if this is the case perhaps reducing (but not cutting out) the amount of exercise may actually be beneficial but most important stick to the gluten-free diet and definately don't indulge in gluten-containing foods if you do exercise alot.

PS. hypoglycemia is not related to diabetes unless the person is on medication, such as insulin, for already diagnosed diabetes

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Hi from Maryland. I was diagnosed with celiac about two and a half years ago, and I notice that over the past six months or so, it has become more and more difficult to wake up in the morning; I have very little to no energy (whereas before I was up at five or so and either in the pool, jogging, or riding my bike); often I am dizzy, nauseous, sweating, manifesting the signs of (fasting) hypoglycemia. What to do, what to do...on the one hand, it's my understanding ya gotta jump-start that blood sugar level right away (this morning I felt like I nearly needed to call an ambulance, my head hurt so badly--I ran yesterday p.m. and obviously sleeping eight or nine hours without a snack or with just a simple snack isn't working for me any more); however, on the other hand, everyone is saying/strongly warning NOT to jump-start the body with simple sugars, that this will just lead to further deterioration and that downward spiral of even more insulin production...ultimately, diabetes....and of course, one has to add to it the fluctuating hormone levels that I'm experiencing, which can also exacerbate the problem.... anybody have any ideas, experience with this, treatments that seem to work for them? Of course I will make an appt with my endocrinologist: that's a no-brainer, but I would like very much to hear how other women are handling this. Clearly, based on what I've read just in just this forum itself, I am not alone: there are a lot of people out there like me. And for me, what might make me different, I'm not sure, but I just don't want to give up the exercise. It's been lousy enough to've been sick and somewhat compromised by celiac for most of my life neve knowing until two years ago what it was/is; I can't bear the idea of losing more time to further deterioration. I just can't. LIfe is so short.

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You should be tested for blood sugar issues. There are tests that can be helpful and give a profile of what is happening with your blood sugar over time and in reaction to glucose. I would want a monitor and to test my BG in the am if what you described is happening. If I knew how low my BG was I could bring it up with a glucose tablet in a measured amount with a predictable effect. Diabetics are taught that X number of grams of glucose will bring BG up by x number of points, based on weight and individual profile. Some say hypoglycemia can't happen in those with diabetes who are not on insulin I'm not sure that's always the case. Individuals vary. My BG used to go up high and come down low. I am not on insulin or any meds. Now that I have a meter and control my diet carefully, it doesn't go up(only a little) and doesn't come down like it used to. It stays in a fairly nice even zone. I eat a very lowcarb diet and eat 4 meals a day. I came to that decision after several medical tests and lots of BG tests at home. Plenty of data. I would want to find out exactly what my body is doing if I were you. Others can give general advice as to diet, and even Doc.s do that, but we are all individuals and unless you have the data on you, you are limited in what you can do and how effective it will be.

Find out what tests are available and ask for specific ones. And don't let any Doc. dismiss your concerns or ignore your requests. There are several types of blood sugar issues. I wouldn't so easily dismiss any one type of blood sugar issue without testing.

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