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Run_4_Jesus

Does Anyone Have Hypoglycemia Along With Their Celiac?

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The reason that diabetics (baring crazy survive in the wilderness for a month scenarios) don't go into a hypoglycemic state without being on meds is because diabetes, by definition, means you don't have enough insulin to move the sugar out of the blood stream, so blood sugar levels *stay* high. Of course, you don't go from having plenty of insulin to having virtually none, and it seems pretty reasonable that in the course of developing diabetes (probably especially type I, as the pancreas *tries* to heal itself despite the autoimmune destruction), there will be spurts of more insulin production (or sensitivity to it) and then less, as the body tries to compensate. If it produces too much, or is too responsive, then you'd get a hypoglycemic episode.

That is one reason why it is important to be checked for diabetes if you are experiencing hypoglycemia - if it's a sign that the pancreas is starting to misfire, and not produce insulin properly (or that your cells are changing their sensitivity to insulin), then you need to know, to keep blood sugar levels very stable, so you *don't* develop diabetes.

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Sorry, not a teen but had to weigh in. My mother always told me that hypoglycemia could turn into diabetes. But the last 3-5 doctors I have spoken with have told me that one has NOTHING to do with the other. Not that I think doctors know much about anything, but I find it curious that they would say that while everyone on this forum seems to believe the opposite. I am hypoglycemic and diabetes runs on both sides of my family so it scares me to death. I don't completely avoid sugar but I try to limit it. Just my 2 cents.

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Sorry, not a teen but had to weigh in. My mother always told me that hypoglycemia could turn into diabetes. But the last 3-5 doctors I have spoken with have told me that one has NOTHING to do with the other.

It could be an issue of an overloaded term.

This site talking about pre-diabetes, and the pancreases attempt to pump out more insulin to the body that is becoming less responsive to it, touches on it.

Hypoglycemia can be caused by a lot of different things, and over production by the pancreas prior to it giving up is only one of them.

The other reason it's very useful to know what's going on is that diabetic hypoglycemia and non-diabetic hypoglycemia are treated a little differently. (Well, best treated, anyway.) If you have reactive hypoglycemia (cause isn't really well understood), and you find yourself with low blood sugar, and use the advice of a glass of juice or something else high sugar - you'll get a rebound effect. You'll feel fine for half an hour, an hour, and then - since your body is either producing a whole heck of a lot of insulin, or is really reactive to it - you'll crash with an even lower blood sugar. Instead, you would want to consume something with some complex carbs - to raise blood sugar slowly - and some fat/protein - to keep blood sugar levels up as digestion takes a while with everything mixed together. This prevents the wild swings in blood sugar (and hence insulin production rates), and is "easier" on the pancreas.

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Hypoglycemia can be caused by a lot of different things, and over production by the pancreas prior to it giving up is only one of them.

The other reason it's very useful to know what's going on is that diabetic hypoglycemia and non-diabetic hypoglycemia are treated a little differently. (Well, best treated, anyway.) If you have reactive hypoglycemia (cause isn't really well understood), and you find yourself with low blood sugar, and use the advice of a glass of juice or something else high sugar - you'll get a rebound effect. You'll feel fine for half an hour, an hour, and then - since your body is either producing a whole heck of a lot of insulin, or is really reactive to it - you'll crash with an even lower blood sugar. Instead, you would want to consume something with some complex carbs - to raise blood sugar slowly - and some fat/protein - to keep blood sugar levels up as digestion takes a while with everything mixed together. This prevents the wild swings in blood sugar (and hence insulin production rates), and is "easier" on the pancreas.

I find that protein works best, and animal protein works the fastest. Apologies to vegetarians/vegans, but it's the truth. I carry wheat free energy bars everywhere I go (they're actually vegan as well) that have a few grams of protein and (I'm pretty sure) gluten-free oats - I have never reacted to them and I am VERY sensitive to gluten.

If I eat sugar or something for a quick fix, I crash again within minutes, so I guess I have the reactive kind? Thanks for the info and taking all the time to explain this stuff.

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