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I have been checking out the posts about Smirnoff and am a little confused. I have read several times that Smirnoff vodka is gluten free.... but when I did a google search the other day, I read a post from this site that said that "Smirnoff ice" is not (can't find it again now). Is this right? I assumed that smirnoff ice was fine and also thought that some of the flavoured vodkas were okay too. Are people only drinking the plain Smirnoff vodka? Or the different flavours and the Smirnoff Ice products (regular and black)?

I emailed the company about all Smirnoff products and got this reponse. What do you all think?

Thank you for taking time to contact Smirnoff. We appreciate hearing from

our consumers, whether comments are complimentary or critical, because your

feedback is important.

In regards to your inquiry, please do note although our Smirnoff products

are specially filtered and treated and most likely does not contain gluten

we have no guarantee from our flavor vendors that they do not have gluten in

their products.

Once again, thank you for contacting Smirnoff.

Sincerely,

Scott D.

Smirnoff Consumer Representative

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From what I gather (although I could be wrong) Smirnoff Vodkas are gluten free because they are corn based. When I drink I have the green apple flavor and I do not get sick. However, Smirnoff Ice has malt in it therefore it does contain gluten. I tried drinking a Smirnoff Ice over Christmas and I did get instantly sick. So I do believe it contains gluten.

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It all depends on your location. In the USA Smirnoff Ice is not gluten free, but in Canada it is gluten free. So, you have to make sure you are contacting the Canadian Smirnoff and not the US Smirnoff.


Tapioca intolerant

First cousin dx'd with Celiac Disease

Grandmother died of malnutrition b/c everything made her sick... sounds like celiac to me.

Gluten-free since June 2005

Dx with IBS February 2005

Blood tests both negative (or inconclusive?) for celiac (in 2002 and 2004)

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...... I assumed that smirnoff ice was fine and also thought that some of the flavoured vodka's....

pg,

I am under the impression that this is not vodka but beer, malt liquor, same thing. Basically, these various liquor company products that come in 4packs and are in bottles like beer usually are beer. Otherwise they wouldn't be able to sell them in beer & wine stores (that can't sell spirits) here in Texas. These stores can't sell anything with a higher alcohol content than wine or beer.

I personally never liked the flavored malt drinks, but some do, mostly women and young people. It's just beer in disguise. Not only that, it's a fraud, 'cause many people simply don't know any better and think they're buying something they're not. It's misleading at best and dishonest marketing at worst.

If you look closely it should say "flavored malt beverage" right on the label. In any case we can't drink beer so it's a moot point for us.

best regards, lm


gluten-free 12-18-06

colonoscopy, upper GI
blood, urine, stool tests, prometheus panel
positive endoscopy/positive duodenal biopsies (severe villous atrophy, high intraepithelial lympocytes)
diagnosed celiac disease by Gastroenterologist Andrew R. Gottesman, 12-18-06

"Sobriety sucks. That's why they invented booze in the first place." Denis Leary - Rescue Me

Beware the chocolate of Chiapa

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pg,

I am under the impression that this is not vodka but beer, malt liquor, same thing. Basically, these various liquor company products that come in 4packs and are in bottles like beer usually are beer. Otherwise they wouldn't be able to sell them in beer & wine stores (that can't sell spirits) here in Texas. These stores can't sell anything with a higher alcohol content than wine or beer.

I personally never liked the flavored malt drinks, but some do, mostly women and young people. It's just beer in disguise. Not only that, it's a fraud, 'cause many people simply don't know any better and think they're buying something they're not. It's misleading at best and dishonest marketing at worst.

If you look closely it should say "flavored malt beverage" right on the label. In any case we can't drink beer so it's a moot point for us.

best regards, lm

Like I said PG, you are in Saskatchewan, Canada so Smirnoff Ice is fine. They don't put malt in the Canadian version since our taste buds are apparently different and we prefer the no-malt taste.


Tapioca intolerant

First cousin dx'd with Celiac Disease

Grandmother died of malnutrition b/c everything made her sick... sounds like celiac to me.

Gluten-free since June 2005

Dx with IBS February 2005

Blood tests both negative (or inconclusive?) for celiac (in 2002 and 2004)

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Like I said PG, you are in Saskatchewan, Canada so Smirnoff Ice is fine. They don't put malt in the Canadian version since our taste buds are apparently different and we prefer the no-malt taste.

f,

I am so sorry (really), I failed to notice she was in canada. I should'nt have made it to her attention but just a general response. Actually, my post was not specifically concerning smirnoff ice, but the broader category of liquor company flavored (malt or no malt) beverages.

Now I'm curious as to why the difference between the us & canada regarding this. Is it really a taste preference thing, or maybe influened because we have 50 different state liquor laws here or what?

best regards, lm


gluten-free 12-18-06

colonoscopy, upper GI
blood, urine, stool tests, prometheus panel
positive endoscopy/positive duodenal biopsies (severe villous atrophy, high intraepithelial lympocytes)
diagnosed celiac disease by Gastroenterologist Andrew R. Gottesman, 12-18-06

"Sobriety sucks. That's why they invented booze in the first place." Denis Leary - Rescue Me

Beware the chocolate of Chiapa

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All Smirnoff liqours are gluten-free. Even if you don't believe that distilling makes liqours OK, Smirnoff is corn based. The comment about not guaranteeing the flavors is the sound of yet another company going to a CYA statement.

As already posted, Smirnoff Ice is gluten-free in Canada but not in the U.S. It's my understanding that Smirnoff Ice in the U.S. does not contain liquor because of 1) the various state liquor laws, and 2) the federal liquor tax would make them too expensive. I can think of one product where I live that does use liquor (Kahlua mixes) and they cost more than $5 for four small bottles.

richard

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pg,

I am under the impression that this is not vodka but beer, malt liquor, same thing. Basically, these various liquor company products that come in 4packs and are in bottles like beer usually are beer. Otherwise they wouldn't be able to sell them in beer & wine stores (that can't sell spirits) here in Texas. These stores can't sell anything with a higher alcohol content than wine or beer.

I personally never liked the flavored malt drinks, but some do, mostly women and young people. It's just beer in disguise. Not only that, it's a fraud, 'cause many people simply don't know any better and think they're buying something they're not. It's misleading at best and dishonest marketing at worst.

If you look closely it should say "flavored malt beverage" right on the label. In any case we can't drink beer so it's a moot point for us.

best regards, lm

LOL ... so true....

However ... I wouldn't be so ready to trust the differences in Canadian vs American ....

It's just beer in disguise. Not only that, it's a fraud, 'cause many people simply don't know any better and think they're buying something they're not. It's misleading at best and dishonest marketing at worst.
I tend to agree, its certainly not a transparently honest marketing plan, indeed it is widely believed in Europe (where you can variously buy "beer" and "spirits" at different ages (You can order beer in a bar at 16 in France in the presence of a responsible adult ... who can be anyone not affiliated with the bar over 18) ...

... that "alchopops" are simply a way to get the younger generation in order to groom them to drink the hard stuff the minute they can buy it!

When I say widely beleived several countires passed legislation against marketing "alchopops" directly at teenagers which was the primary focus of their marketing.

One only has to look at what these companies offer at "promotion nights" where they sponser bars to give it away for free with gifts...

Jameson's Whisky did one and gave away green wollen scarves and umbrellas ... not your typical teen-wear ... for instance (I happen to have both freebies even though I didn't imbibe)

Glenmorangie gave away golf tees and a nice little holder....

Smirnoff give away T shirts wallpaers and ring tones for cell phones....? I wonder what market segment that hits? Oh and a free chance to enter a raffle for a years subscription ot a teen music mag?

So my perception is they are trying to circumvent laws to protect minors ... I agree the advertising is at best misleading... WHY on earth would I trust this company?

All Smirnoff liqours are gluten-free. Even if you don't believe that distilling makes liqours OK, Smirnoff is corn based. The comment about not guaranteeing the flavors is the sound of yet another company going to a CYA statement.

lovegrov.... I just want to acknowledge your compromise on this... and say I respect it. I'm now going to quote you and partially disagree but in complete respect and acknowledging you made a compromise....

As already posted, Smirnoff Ice is gluten-free in Canada but not in the U.S. It's my understanding that Smirnoff Ice in the U.S. does not contain liquor because of 1) the various state liquor laws, and 2) the federal liquor tax would make them too expensive. I can think of one product where I live that does use liquor (Kahlua mixes) and they cost more than $5 for four small bottles.
This makes complete sense ... It's honestly the only sense for a company like Smirnoff :D and that's financial sense...

Other than this I just don't trust the company.... based on how much it costs them if they get proven wrong?

I think the gluten issue is largely financial, not just for Smirnoff but for any company selling liquor...

Anyway, its largely beleived that 21 is the legal drinking age i the US but this is not entirely true....

Fraternities and sororities operate outside of this as a simple example.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fraternities_and_sororities

In response to the developing stereotype of excessive alcohol use in fraternity life, some fraternities today are alcohol-free.
Which taken at face value indicates many of them are not alcohol free and by definition serving alcohol to under 21's...

My understanding is that the Univerity itself acts as a "responsible adult" ... anyway... Never having been in one I can only guess but anyone want to guess how popular alchopops are in frat houses? Any brothers or sisters care to comment?


Fere libenter homines id quod volunt credunt. (JC, De Bello Gallico Liber III/XVIII)

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Anyway, its largely beleived that 21 is the legal drinking age i the US but this is not entirely true....

Fraternities and sororities operate outside of this as a simple example.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fraternities_and_sororities

Which taken at face value indicates many of them are not alcohol free and by definition serving alcohol to under 21's...

My understanding is that the Univerity itself acts as a "responsible adult" ... anyway... Never having been in one I can only guess but anyone want to guess how popular alchopops are in frat houses? Any brothers or sisters care to comment?

The fraternities that serve alcohol are not serving it legally. They usually go to great lengths to hide it from the university as well. When I was in college, they'd put the beer in the private rooms because the university had the right to search the house, but not the guy's rooms. They still do this today. If the university officials walk in, they will not be able to find it.

What this comment means, that some fraternities are alcohol free, is that if the national office of the fraternity finds out there was illegal alcohol there, they will either kick out the person with it, or possibly even withdraw the charter for the chapter and reorganize at a later date. This is becoming the norm.

We used to hide the alcohol in our rooms, but drink it elsewhere back when I was in a sorority. My daughter is now in the same sorority and she tells me that they'll get in trouble for doing that today. They keep it in their car now. Even back when I was there, we seldom drank in the house, and if we did, we were hiding in our room.


gluten-free 12/05

diagnosed with Lyme Disease 12/06

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I can only guess but anyone want to guess how popular alchopops are in frat houses? Any brothers or sisters care to comment?

Umm, no, they drink beer. Sometimes there is cheap vodka available that they drink as shots. It's all based on price.

Back when I was in school and knew beer made me sick (now I know why, LOL), I used to buy a McDonald's Coke, then pour enough rum in it for the evening because I couldn't drink the beer. My dad usually bought me the rum, or my mom, LOL.

Some states allow minors to drink at a private club or home if the PARENT is there. So, that means my kids can drink legally at home with me since I live in Ohio. But when we were in Indiana, I could get into trouble serving them at home. I cannot serve someone else's kid unless that parent is present, and I cannot give my child alcohol in a public restaurant, etc.


gluten-free 12/05

diagnosed with Lyme Disease 12/06

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Carla

http://www.sinfonia.org/resources/PolicyonChapterHouses.pdf

PHI MU ALPHA SINFONIA FRATERNITY POLICY ON CHAPTER HOUSES

.............

Unless the general public is invited to a chapter party, the house or the facility in which the party is

held would probably not be considered a public place. For that reason serving liquor at such a function would

not be considered doing so at a public place and in violation of the law. To be safe, it should be made clear

that members of the general public are not invited to chapter functions. Some safeguards should also be

taken to insure that persons other than chapter members and their guests are barred from events where

alcoholic beverages will be served.

The greatest potential liability occurs when one negligently or otherwise serves liquor to a person

already intoxicated and that intoxicated person then injures himself or a third party. If a reasonable person

would not have served liquor to that individual considering his age, maturity and apparent sobriety, liability

attaches to the server for any damage that an individual might do. That liability may attach not only to the

server but also to the chapter and its members as well.


Fere libenter homines id quod volunt credunt. (JC, De Bello Gallico Liber III/XVIII)

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Also, this.

The purchase of alcoholic beverages by a social chairman for a party at which minors may consume

alcohol may be considered purchasing alcohol for a minor. To assure that this does not occur, purchases of

alcoholic beverages should be made only on an individual basis by members of lawful age.


gluten-free 12/05

diagnosed with Lyme Disease 12/06

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This was also there ...

Yes but that is specifically bypassed....

http://www2.potsdam.edu/hansondj/LegalDrinkingAge.html

The National Minimum Drinking Age Act of 1984 required all states to raise their minimum purchase and public possession of alcohol age to 21. States that did not comply faced a reduction in highway funds under the Federal Highway Aid Act.... It does not prohibit persons under 21 (also called youth or minors) from drinking. The term "public possession" is strictly defined and does not apply to possession for the following:

* An established religious purpose, when accompanied by a parent, spouse or legal guardian age 21 or older

* Medical purposes when prescribed or administered by a licensed physician, pharmacist, dentist, nurse, hospital or medical institution

* In private clubs or establishments

* In the course of lawful employment by a duly licensed manufacturer, wholesaler or retailer.


Fere libenter homines id quod volunt credunt. (JC, De Bello Gallico Liber III/XVIII)

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Private Clubs, yes. I used to drink wine with my parents at the country club. Again, that was Ohio and I could drink with my parents in private places, just not public. I could not, however, order alcohol there without my parents being present.

As far as fraternities and sororities legally serving alcohol, I just don't think that's true. I certainly have never heard of one doing it legally ... even the previous example you gave does not allow it. MOST of the members of a fraternity/sorority will not be over the age of 21 since it's undergraduates who belong to the chapters.


gluten-free 12/05

diagnosed with Lyme Disease 12/06

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Okay, the map is misleading and I don't actually understand it. I KNOW the drinking age in Florida is 21 ... my dad owns a night club there. My own daughter could not drink in his nightclub or anywhere else even if she was with me (normally he does not allow those under 21 in ... but since she was over 18 and it was a weeknight, he made and exception for a short time so she could see the place).

So, I really don't know what they mean "not prohibited." It must be referring to "not prohibited in private places."


gluten-free 12/05

diagnosed with Lyme Disease 12/06

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I have found a wonderful vodka for the gluten free circuit - Ciroc, it is made from grapes. It is very smooth and I have yet to have a hangover the next day. :blink:

Janet

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Private Clubs, yes. I used to drink wine with my parents at the country club. Again, that was Ohio and I could drink with my parents in private places, just not public. I could not, however, order alcohol there without my parents being present.

As far as fraternities and sororities legally serving alcohol, I just don't think that's true. I certainly have never heard of one doing it legally ... even the previous example you gave does not allow it. MOST of the members of a fraternity/sorority will not be over the age of 21 since it's undergraduates who belong to the chapters.

Carla, look back at my first post when I said the university assumed the role of a legal guardian.

I know a know a lot of weird stuff but the reason I wrote this and knew where to look is because it was explained to me by an American Law student. I wasn't just stabbing in the dark... I pretty much knew what to google... and the law student (who was here last year doing his Masters) explained this to me when I asked specifically about how frat houses get away with it and if its just a TV thing.

I could not, however, order alcohol there without my parents being present.

Is I think the key here ... read the whole link ... the federal prohibition only covers SELLING alcohol... and not every state even signed up for it, some took a hit instead on Federal funding for highways and others made specific exclusions..

The one I believe used by frat's is the private property ... and no members of the public present... only members (fraternity brothers) of the fraternity are present and they cannot be charged directly for drinks or serve themselves.

In the same way, drugs are illegal, especially in prisons... but it would be niaeve to think they do not exist!

Perhaps we can wait for anyone currently in a frat or sorority to comment on the original question as to if alchopops are popular?

(regardless of legality or not)

However many of the state exceptions are actually over "beer" and "liquor" so Lovegroves tax reason also applies if an exception applies for "beer" since as larry mac initially pointed out it is essentailly a "beer"


Fere libenter homines id quod volunt credunt. (JC, De Bello Gallico Liber III/XVIII)

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f,

I am so sorry (really), I failed to notice she was in canada. I should'nt have made it to her attention but just a general response. Actually, my post was not specifically concerning smirnoff ice, but the broader category of liquor company flavored (malt or no malt) beverages.

Now I'm curious as to why the difference between the us & canada regarding this. Is it really a taste preference thing, or maybe influened because we have 50 different state liquor laws here or what?

best regards, lm

Sorry if I was short, but I just didn't want there to be any confusion.

I didn't realize that you guys had different state liquor laws. Interesting.


Tapioca intolerant

First cousin dx'd with Celiac Disease

Grandmother died of malnutrition b/c everything made her sick... sounds like celiac to me.

Gluten-free since June 2005

Dx with IBS February 2005

Blood tests both negative (or inconclusive?) for celiac (in 2002 and 2004)

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It would be interesting to know whether your law student friend was ever IN a fraternity/sorority! I can only speak as to the policies of the NATIONAL chapters, these are the ones on the larger campuses, and sometimes the smaller. It's generally very small colleges that have chapters that are not national. According to a USA Today article, no NATIONAL chapter allows it. http://www.usatoday.com/news/health/child/...ge-drinking.htm

National Greek organizations, too, have taken action, banning alcohol and hazing from chapter houses and shuttering houses that violate rules. Phi Sigma Kappa national officials this week revoked the charter of its University of Maryland chapter, effective Saturday. About 30 members must move out of the fraternity house by the end of next week.

Back to your original question. My daughter goes to a Big Ten University. They drink beer or cheap vodka. No argument that drinking in college exists ... just arguing over whether it's legal. The law can be interpreted in different ways, thus the need for lawyers. We'll have to agree to disagree. I'm more familiar with how the fraternity/sororities operate than the laws governing them. I was in a sorority, my daughter is, and I served on the house board of the sorority (the "landlord") last year.


gluten-free 12/05

diagnosed with Lyme Disease 12/06

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Is I think the key here ... read the whole link ... the federal prohibition only covers SELLING alcohol... and not every state even signed up for it, some took a hit instead on Federal funding for highways and others made specific exclusions..

Hmm, I've never heard of a state where you can order alcohol under the age of 21. I know there are exclusions, on private property as your link said.


gluten-free 12/05

diagnosed with Lyme Disease 12/06

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Back in the ancient days when I was in college, each year each of the four classes sponsored a grain alcohol punch party. At that time we could drink beer at age 18 but in Virginia you still couldn't have liquor until age 21. Didn't seem to matter; we still had these parties fueled by this 190 proof paint peeler called Everclear (which you can't get in Virginia any more). Two of the four parties were held in the middle of town on fraternity property and everybody just looked the other way as long as you didn't assault anyone or damage property. I never heard of a fraternity getting busted for an alcohol violation.

Down the road at my wife's college, they had an annual party called Easter's that also involved thousands, perhaps tens of thousands, of people getting drunk and sliding in the mud. The city actually closed down public streets for this and the medical school sent students out to monitor for people who might need medical attention.

Times were different.

richard

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At Ohio State, I drank a "considerable" amount before I was 21. This occurred at Fraternity Houses, friends houses and bars.

At the time, the elder fraternity members in my house allowed underage brothers to drink at parties (encouraged is a better word). However, my National Fraternity's bylaws outlawed underage consumption of alcohol. Over the past 15 years, fraternities have gotten sued for every little thing that happens at their houses. As such, the national fraternities started cracking down and making many houses "dry houses".

My fraternity at OSU is a dry house. They allow some drinking on alumni weekends (thank God), but otherwise there is no drinking in the house. Furthermore, my fraternity alligned with OSU and started having a "house professor" from the university live with the brothers. As such, the brothers now can now get in trouble for drinking at the house from the university (as well as the chapter's judicial committee and the chaplain) as the house was now considered "quasi-university" property.

I would feel bad for the guys, but most brothers who are 21 or older do not live in the house anymore anyway. The house smells better, looks better and their recruitment has gone up since they eliminated alcohol-related events at the house and banished hazing.

With the amount of lawsuits in this country, it was no suprise that frats would quit having huge "keggers" at their house.

BB

p.s. When I was there, we used to offer "jungle juice" or "hairy buffalo" for girls who did not want beer. It contained a egregious amount of Rum/Vodka (though it was hidden by a large amount of Kool Aid and Water).

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Richard, I went to college in the good 'ol days, too! I went to Indiana University. For the Little 500 weekend (think Breaking Away, the movie), there was drinking from Thursday through Sunday. The fraternities would have over 40 kegs! Everyone knew, no one cared. That changed drastically my last year of college.

My husband's fraternity was shut down (recently)... it was the oldest continually running chapter (of any fraternity) in the country ... Indiana Alpha chapter of Phi Delta Theta. IU is closing frats left and right. They used to turn a blind eye, but too many people died of alcohol poisoning.

BB, once in a while I could find a non-beer drink, but generally speaking, I usually brought my own. If I found something other than beer, it was someone's personal stash. As you point out ... it was better for a college GIRL to make her own drinks. ;)

The strange thing for me was, I could drink beer at 18 in Ohio where I grew up, I could drink liquor at 19 in Texas where my mom moved, but I couldn't drink in bars at all in Indiana where the age was 21. I turned 21 in 1984, so the "new" laws for me were a moot point.


gluten-free 12/05

diagnosed with Lyme Disease 12/06

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Back in the ancient days when I was in college, each year each of the four classes sponsored a grain alcohol punch party. At that time we could drink beer at age 18 but in Virginia you still couldn't have liquor until age 21. Didn't seem to matter; we still had these parties fueled by this 190 proof paint peeler called Everclear (which you can't get in Virginia any more). Two of the four parties were held in the middle of town on fraternity property and everybody just looked the other way as long as you didn't assault anyone or damage property. I never heard of a fraternity getting busted for an alcohol violation.

Down the road at my wife's college, they had an annual party called Easter's that also involved thousands, perhaps tens of thousands, of people getting drunk and sliding in the mud. The city actually closed down public streets for this and the medical school sent students out to monitor for people who might need medical attention.

Times were different.

richard

WITNESS!!!!!...Grain alcohol in a trash cans in Red Square. How I survived? :blink:


Lisa

Gluten Free - August 15, 2004

"Not all who wander are lost" - JRR Tolkien

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