Celiac.com Sponsor (A1):


Join eNewsletter


Celiac.com Sponsor (A1-m):



Join eNewsletter

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

Q1821

Taxes

Recommended Posts


Celiac.com Sponsor (A8):

Celiac.com Sponsor (A8):


In some cases, people are able to deduct the cost of the differences of the gluten free foods from their gluten containing counterparts. However, that has to exceed a certain percentage of your annual income, 7% I believe.

So, if you spent $3.00 on a gluten-free loaf of bread - and a normal loaf of bread is $1.50, you could deduct that $1.50 difference. But the total spent on gluten free products would have to be more than 7% of your total earnings for the year. If you earned $50,000.00 - you would have had to have spent more than $3500.00 in differences between the gluten free / gluten containing foods. And, naturally - you'd have to have documentation and receipts for absolutely everything.


Jayhawkmom -

Mom of three....

Jay - 11

Bean - 8

Ian - 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have also heard that you could just submit it your cafeteria plan. I was actually planning on calling my provider sometime this week to check.


Tritty (my childhood nickname....)

Age 31, Mommy of 3

Blood test positive for celiac 1/16/07

gluten-free since 1/16/07

Endoscopy 2/13/07 - small hiatal hernia, scalloped mucosa in 1st and 2nd part of duodenum, some erosion of the esophogus.

Two oldest kids - fine so far :)

My 17 mo old has eosinophilic esophogitis. Only showing milk allergy? So completely off dairy for time being to see if that is trigger...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You can deduct the difference (like jayhawkmom said) between the regular price of an item and the gluten-free alternative, but only if the total difference along with all your other eligible oiut of pocket medical expenses exceeds 7.5% of AGI. Plus, you must keep all receipts to prove what you have spent. It is very hard to get your medical expenses to exceed 7.5% of AGI, so most of the time not worth the effort (I'm an accountant, that's how I know about this) :) I know some people just deduct their difference without regard to the 7.5% AGI amount, but this is not legal and if you get audited you will owe penalties, etc.

Also, as far as your cafeteria plan, it depends on your particular plan, but would definitely be worth calling about.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Does anyone know if we can get a refund for celiac disease and the extra expenses? Is it true or something I heard? Thanks

Are you in the US or Canada, they are slightly different.


Shirley

[save the Earth, It's the only planet with chocolate and wine.

It isn't about waiting for the storm to pass...

It's about learning to dance in the rain.

Gluten free since 1989

West Kootenay.... British Columbia

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I asked this question to an accountant last tax season. He said that his wife has Celiac as well and that he investigated this and that you cannot claim the food as a detuctable. I think he said you would have to have a perscription for something to be claimable. We live in Jersey. I wonder if the reason is that people can eat naturally gluten free foods. Those of us that buy the high costing gluten free foods chose to do so.

Nicole

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My father is an accountant, and he tells me you also need a letter from your doctor confirming the diagnosis, and you should have receipts for your gluten-free foods, and they should also be stamped Gluten Free. IT is true that the difference in cost is what is deductable, and if you do a lot of baking etc, there is some crazy formula to figure out which part of the food budget belongs to the celiac. However, my dad also says that most families use up the max. allowable medical deductions before it ever becmones an issue. Just something to think about.


Ryan

Positive blood work May 06

Positive results with diet change

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites