Celiac.com Sponsor (A1):


Join eNewsletter


Celiac.com Sponsor (A1-m):



Join eNewsletter

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

russtay1

Whole Grain Bread?

Recommended Posts

A lot of diets I see recommend a piece of whole grain bread. All the gluten-free bread I have tried has very little fiber. Are there any commercially available breads that have a "nutty" texture?

Thanks,

Anne

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Celiac.com Sponsor (A8):

Celiac.com Sponsor (A8):


Check out flaxmeal or flax seed. It can be added to breads you make or to yogurt--whatever. Whole grain refers to wheat or rye bread, usually anyways.


Deb

Long Island, NY

Double DQ1, subtype 6

We urge all doctors to take time to listen to your patients.. don't "isolate" symptoms but look at the whole spectrum. If a patient tells you s/he feels as if s/he's falling apart and "nothing seems to be working properly", chances are s/he's right!

"The calm river of your life approaches the rocky chute of the rapids - flow on through. You are the same water. The rocks cannot hurt you. Remember, now and then, that you are the water and not the boat. Flow on!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks Deb.

I'm thinking of "grains" like seeds and nuts...but specifically high fiber carbs. The diet recommends high fiber carbs because they take longer to digest. Is there such a thing as high fiber carbs in a gluten free diet?

I am looking for a commercially available bread.

Thanks,

Anne

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Thanks Deb.

I'm thinking of "grains" like seeds and nuts...but specifically high fiber carbs. The diet recommends high fiber carbs because they take longer to digest. Is there such a thing as high fiber carbs in a gluten free diet?

I am looking for a commercially available bread.

Thanks,

Anne

Well, brown rice is often used for gluten-free whole grain breads. Lots of fiber in that too. For the "nutty" texture/taste, I've read millet flour does that to a bread recipe, though I don't know if there are any commercially available breads with a notable amount of millet. Usually flax is used to boost the fiber content to such high levels.

However, your comments suggest to me that you may not be referring to the gluten-free diet. True?

BTW, popcorn is very high in fiber.


A spherical meteorite 10 km in diameter traveling at 20 km/s has the kinetic energy equal to the calories in 550,000,000,000,000,000 Twinkies.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
However, your comments suggest to me that you may not be referring to the gluten-free diet. True?

I am referring to a diet I saw in Woman's Health magazine. A sugar-balancing diet. And seeing whole grain bread made me realize how much I miss it. I've been gluten free for a while now and am looking for some variety.

I really like the Kinnikinnick english muffins.. but they are definitely not high fiber.

I may try making bread. I will search here for recipes. Thanks for the advice.

Anne.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There are many ways to enjoy high fiber foods besides breads. You might consider Kasha (roasted buckwheat). It's not related to wheat, and is gluten-free of course. I use it like a hot cereal, or as a grain. Legumes (beans/lentils) are high in fiber as well. I think I saw a a recipe for millet bread on this site, but you can just look up the bread recipes and see what appeals to you.

If you want to cut down on sugar, consider Stevia. It's an all natural sweetener, extracted from an herb. It has no carbs, no calories, has no effect on blood sugar, doesn't promote tooth decay, no known side effects, etc. Google will help you locate some info and brands, but do a bit of looking before deciding, as not all brands are equal in quality/purity.


A spherical meteorite 10 km in diameter traveling at 20 km/s has the kinetic energy equal to the calories in 550,000,000,000,000,000 Twinkies.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Kinnickinik (sp) makes a ready made whole grain bread, I haven't tried it cause I love their Italian but it may be worth a try. Also a note on stevia, if you are allergic to ragweed avoid stevia and maybe try agave syrup. I didn't know about its relationship to ragweed and ended up with nasty blisters in my throat. If your not allergic to ragweed it great stuff though.


Courage does not always roar, sometimes courage is the quiet voice at the end of the day saying

"I will try again tommorrow" (Mary Anne Radmacher)

Diagnosed by Allergist with elimination diet and diagnosis confirmed by GI in 2002

Misdiagnoses for 15 years were IBS-D, ataxia, migraines, anxiety, depression, fibromyalgia, parathesias, arthritis, livedo reticularis, hairloss, premature menopause, osteoporosis, kidney damage, diverticulosis, prediabetes and ulcers, dermatitis herpeformis

All bold resoved or went into remission in time with proper diagnosis of Celiac November 2002

 Gene Test Aug 2007

HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 1 0303

HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 2 0303

Serologic equivalent: HLA-DQ 3,3 (Subtype 9,9)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Thanks Deb.

I'm thinking of "grains" like seeds and nuts...but specifically high fiber carbs. The diet recommends high fiber carbs because they take longer to digest. Is there such a thing as high fiber carbs in a gluten free diet?

I am looking for a commercially available bread.

Thanks,

Anne

High fiber carbs that are gluten free:

quinoa, amaranth, buckwheat, teff, montina (in bread), many vegetables, beans, lentils, flax, hemp seed, etc.

Honestly, I don't find bread to be the best way to get carbs, or fiber. And I don't find much in the way of commercially prepared bread that is truly low in sugars and simple starches, and high in complex starches and fiber. Certainly not with a reasonable texture. Even the muffins I make that way don't hold up after a few days, because the gluten that gives these items those textures is missing. Instead, I eat the items listed above as part of my regular meals, sometimes as hot cereal with the first items (and last two) particulalry.


Tiffany aka "Have I Mentioned Chocolate Lately?"

Inconclusive Blood Tests, Positive Dietary Results, No Endoscopy

G.F. - September 2003; C.F. - July 2004

Hiker, Yoga Teacher, Engineer, Painter, Be-er of Me

Bellevue, WA

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
.....

Honestly, I don't find bread to be the best way to get carbs, or fiber. And I don't find much in the way of commercially prepared bread that is truly low in sugars and simple starches, and high in complex starches and fiber. Certainly not with a reasonable texture. Even the muffins I make that way don't hold up after a few days, because the gluten that gives these items those textures is missing

....

I don't measure any gluten-free bread in days, but rather hours. Unless freezing. That seems to be the (partial) solution.

lm


gluten-free 12-18-06

colonoscopy, upper GI
blood, urine, stool tests, prometheus panel
positive endoscopy/positive duodenal biopsies (severe villous atrophy, high intraepithelial lympocytes)
diagnosed celiac disease by Gastroenterologist Andrew R. Gottesman, 12-18-06

"Sobriety sucks. That's why they invented booze in the first place." Denis Leary - Rescue Me

Beware the chocolate of Chiapa

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That's the rub - I only need them to stay good for about four or five days; smack in the middle of "to freeze or not freeze". :)


Tiffany aka "Have I Mentioned Chocolate Lately?"

Inconclusive Blood Tests, Positive Dietary Results, No Endoscopy

G.F. - September 2003; C.F. - July 2004

Hiker, Yoga Teacher, Engineer, Painter, Be-er of Me

Bellevue, WA

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites


  • Celiac.com Sponsors (A19):


  • Member Statistics

    • Total Members
      91,950
    • Most Online
      6,255

    Newest Member
    PSHadle
    Joined

  • Celiac.com Sponsor (A20):


  • Forum Statistics

    • Total Topics
      115,585
    • Total Posts
      969,284

  • Celiac.com Sponsor (A21):


  • Who's Online (See full list)


  • Celiac.com Sponsor (A22):


  • Blog Entries