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alamaz

Help! Enterolab Results - What Is Included With Casein?

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Okay, so my Enterolab Results are back. These are the results:

Anitgliadin IgA: 317 (normal <10)

Antitissue Transglutaminase IgA: 139 (normal <10)

Fat Score: 1164 (normal <300)

Anti-Casein: 180 (normal <10)

Chicken Egg: 14 (normal <10)

dietary yeast: 26 (normal <10)

Soy: 141 (normal <10)

I also have one of the main genes and one non-celiac gene predisposing me to gluten sensitvity and that my gluten sensitivity or celiac may be more severe.

NOW to my questions:

Is the casein just diary products or do I need to worry about "hidden" casein like I do with gluten? What are the chances that this will heal being that it's so high?

For the eggs: does the low score mean I should avoid them completely? For instance, should I stop eating gluten-free baked goods with eggs or is that not as problematic? I won't eat them for breakfast but I made meatloaf last night with two eggs, is that bad?

Soy: no problem. I think soy is dangerous in and of itself and the fact that it's promoted as a healthy alternative to things so extensively drives me up a wall.

What is yeast? What is yeast used in?

Thanks for every one's great resources and advice. I didn't realize how bad I was. Esp. the fat absorption. That's scary since I'm not exactly a skinny minny (but not overwight either) but yet I'm not absorbing a whole lot of fat...

I feel better with these results oddly enough.

Amy


Diagnosed with Celiac Disease February 2007

Finally feeling better than ever!

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If I were you, I would eat a very clean diet until you're feeling quite a bit better. Basically just meat, veggies, and fruit. Also some brown rice (including Tinkyada Pasta). The simple diet should help you a lot.

Even a low number that is positive is still positive. I'd avoid it at least for now. Once you are healed, then maybe challenge it. My casein score was 32, I got off it for six months, then challenged it. Casein gives me no problems whatsoever. I'm thinking that maybe my leaky gut was so bad in the beginning that I was reacting to the casein even though I would normally not have issues with it.

Sorry, lots of hidden casein. Most non-dairy creamers have casein :blink: . Usually the product will say milk, whey, sodium caseinate, or some other variation of the word casein. The new allergen laws make it easier, if it says dairy, it has casein. I just read labels and didn't worry about contamination issues.

Yeast will be listed as an ingredient. Usually it's in bread, bagels, etc. Kinnikinnick has a bread that is yeast-free. It's about as heavy as a brick, but a toaster does wonders.


gluten-free 12/05

diagnosed with Lyme Disease 12/06

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Ouch, your scores are through the roof. Weight gain has nothing to do with how much fat you absorb. In fact, a diet fairly high in the right, healthy fats (like coconut oil) will help you lose weight. It's the carbohydrates that are the culprit in weight gain.

You definitely need to eliminate all egg right now. And I mean from every source. So, no, putting eggs into your meatloaf or baking is not okay. As Carla said, you can try it again once your intestines heal, which will likely take six months to a year. Probably closer to a year, given your high scores.

I was hoping I could tolerate eggs again after a while. But it has been one and a half years now, and I still react just as badly to them as at the beginning. So, don't be too disappointed if you have to give them up forever (okay, I am more upset about eggs than everything else, still, it is hard!).

At least now you know and need to face the facts, no more guessing and saying, "oh, a little bit of .........won't hurt, will it?", because obviously it will.

I hope you figure it all out quickly and learn to read all those labels. I agree that just eating plain food that is naturally free of everything you can't tolerate is best. Give your gut a chance to heal before you challenge it with anything processed.


I am a German citizen, married to a Canadian 29 years, four daughters, one son, seven granddaughters and four grandsons, with one more grandchild on the way in July 2009.

Intolerant to all lectins (including gluten), nightshades (potatoes, tomatoes, peppers, eggplant) and salicylates.

Asperger Syndrome, Tourette Syndrome, Addison's disease (adrenal insufficiency), hypothyroidism, fatigue syndrome, asthma

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Thanks. When my doctor called with the blood tests she said "yes you are VERY positive" but never gave me the results. Now I know, I'm REALLY positive. I think I have a long road ahead of me but I just learned my sister and my nieces are all getting blood tests! YEAH! I don't want them to have this but I do want them all to be healthy so I'm hoping they will all be negative and my parents stored up the crappy genes for me haha... :blink:

maybe i should go vegan.......

Amy


Diagnosed with Celiac Disease February 2007

Finally feeling better than ever!

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maybe i should go vegan.......

You are so restricted right now, I wouldn't cut out meat. Obviously you can't have eggs or dairy. Without soy, it's possible to go vegan, but it would be tough. Just choose good quality meat, no hormones or antibiotics. You'll be like a vegan who eats meat, but not all the other animal products! :lol:

I'd also focus on veggies. If you have a juicer or live near a place that has a fresh juice bar, that's probably a good way to get lots of nutrients since you're not digesting well right now. Raw veggies are best, but if you're anything like I was in the beginning, you won't be digesting them. I cooked mine to death in the beginning or drank juice. Hold the juice in your mouth like you're "eating" it so that it has a chance to mix with your saliva so it's better digested.

Ursa Major is right about the fat. Americans are notoriously low in the essential fatty acids, but way too high in fat. Cut out the bad fat, use good fat -- extra virgin olive oil and coconut oil.


gluten-free 12/05

diagnosed with Lyme Disease 12/06

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Carla- funny thing is- I used to juice! and then when i really started feeling bad with D and stuff I stopped because I thought maybe it was making it worse (before diagnosis of course). I'd like to start again at some point but I'm a little worried that too much at once will throw me off. I used to juice things like spinach, celery, beets occassionally carrots, tomato, wheat grass and for a treat a green apple/pear combo (much tastier than the veggies!). Do you have any good juice combo's that are easy to digest and tasty? i also got a little burned out on it because i was scared to try new veggies and i heard if you drink the same veggie every day you can develop an allergy to it......

i only know of one place locally that has fresh juices. maybe before i go back to buying all of my veggies for juicing i'll hit that place.....


Diagnosed with Celiac Disease February 2007

Finally feeling better than ever!

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I always liked apple/celery or apple/carrot juice the best. I also used to make carrot/beet/celery a lot. I'd put almost any veggie in the juicer with carrots. I haven't juiced for years, but occasionally buy carrot juice at Wild Oats. With this stupid Lyme Disease, I don't have the energy to eat, much less juice!!

I also loved cantelope or watermelon in the blender! You can even add a little banana to the cantelope. I like the blender idea because there's not so much waste. I've been thinking for years about getting one of those Vitamix blenders so I can do the veggies without waste, too.

Except for gluten intolerance, I'm not prone to food allergies, so I used to juice apples and/or carrots every day.

You can do all the ones you used to do except for the wheat grass.

Juicing is cleansing ... so I can see how it might have seemed to be affecting your symptoms! I was juicing twice daily ... big glasses! I don't think I'd start out with that!!


gluten-free 12/05

diagnosed with Lyme Disease 12/06

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Juicing is cleansing ... so I can see how it might have seemed to be affecting your symptoms! I was juicing twice daily ... big glasses! I don't think I'd start out with that!!

Yeah, two glasses a day is a lot! You were a trooper! I was taking in one 12oz glass and I thought THAT was a lot :lol:


Diagnosed with Celiac Disease February 2007

Finally feeling better than ever!

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Welcome to the club -- the one that is glad that Enterolab doesn't test for anything else :lol: I eat vegan, too, so it is an experience. Eating at home isn't bad. Questioning folks in restaurants about every substance can be a hassle. And I think my grocery shopping is taking at least twice as long.

You need to be concerned with bits of casein (and everything else), at least initially. With the new labeling laws, you should be able to tell if things contain milk, egg, or soy. However, I think it useful to know the names these things can go by. A company might think that the named ingredient makes it obvious and so they don't need an allergen label. This link will give you explanations for avoiding milk, egg, and soy (wheat, too, as well as some other common allergens). http://www.ohsuhealth.com/htaz/allergy/all...foods/index.cfm

Be sure to check out your supplements, medicines, etc. too. For instance, much Vitamin E is derived from soy. If something says "starch," you need to know what kind of starch. Fun, fun, fun.

For soy, Enterolab told me I had to avoid anything with soy, except that soy lecithin seems to be OK. You may think you've been avoiding it already, but your score proves otherwise. I've found that many, many things have some soybean oil, soy sauce, soy flour, soy protein, etc. (As far as the oil is concerned, one site says that it is OK because it is just fat and then offending protein is absent. But another site says it depends on the method used for extracting the oil. I figure I certainly am not going to be able to tell, so I just avoid it.)

As far as yeast is concerned, I asked Enterolab what I had to avoid. They told me anything with "yeast" in the list of ingredients. So this cuts out bread and crackers with yeast in them, anything with hydrolyzed yeast or yeast extract, and beer I assume. I haven't been able to find anything about how well the yeast is taken out. For wine, I found an allergy site that said that the yeast is taken out so well that reactions by those allergic to yeast (and thus more sensitive than the intolerant folks) are very rare. So I'm drinking it :lol:

It is confusing because if you search for "yeast free diet" you will get a lot on anti-Candida diets or folks that are sensitive to mold as well. From what I can tell, this doesn't apply to folks like us :D

I asked Enterolab if these other intolerances will go away. They told me no. I don't know what that is based on. I think after a year I may challenge with soy and yeast. I did run across one study where about a half of celiacs at diagnosis have antibodies to yeast. After a year of gluten-free eating, some no longer did.

I think that handles your questions. If you have any others for someone who has a whole month of experience on you :lol: ask away. If it makes you feel any better, I am feeling really good these days. I questioned whether I even had a problem with soy or yeast, until I found I was doing better without them. Problems I thought were completely unrelated have been clearing up.


McDougall diet (low fat vegan) since 6/00

Gluten free since 1/6/07

Soy free and completely casein and egg free since 2/15/07

Yeast free, on and off, since 3/1/07 -- I can't notice any difference one way or the other

Enterolab results -- 2/15/07

Fecal Antigliladin IgA 140 (Normal Range <10 units)

Fecal Antitissue Transglutaminase IgA 50 (Normal Range <10 units)

Quantitative Microscopic Fecal Fat Score 517 (Normal Range <300 units)

Fecal anti-casein (cow's milk) IgA antibody 127 (Normal Range <10 units)

HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 1 0501

HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 2 06xx

Serologic equivalent: HLA-DQ 1,1 (subtype 5,6)

Fecal anti-ovalbumin (chicken egg) IgA antibody 11 (Normal range <10 units)

Fecal Anti-Saccharomyces cerevisiae (dietary yeast) IgA 11 (Normal range <10 units)

Fecal Anti-Soy IgA 119 (Normal Range < 10 units)

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maybe i should go vegan.......

I was eating vegan for a number of years before finding out about my food intolerances. Adjusting to those intolerances hasn't been any more difficult than it seems to be for those who eat meat.

If this is an indication of something you might want to do, rather than an expression of frustration (hard to tell with internet posts), I will certainly be willing to discuss it further with you. Also, there are sites with lots of gluten-free vegan recipes I can link to. I just finished reading a book with vegan recipes that avoid all these things we have to avoid, with information about nutrition -- I can give you the title.

Not trying to overwhelm or pressure you here. You may want to stay as close as you can to what you have been eating and I completely understand that. Resources and mutual support is available if you decide you want to at least explore a different path.

Whatever you decide, good luck!


McDougall diet (low fat vegan) since 6/00

Gluten free since 1/6/07

Soy free and completely casein and egg free since 2/15/07

Yeast free, on and off, since 3/1/07 -- I can't notice any difference one way or the other

Enterolab results -- 2/15/07

Fecal Antigliladin IgA 140 (Normal Range <10 units)

Fecal Antitissue Transglutaminase IgA 50 (Normal Range <10 units)

Quantitative Microscopic Fecal Fat Score 517 (Normal Range <300 units)

Fecal anti-casein (cow's milk) IgA antibody 127 (Normal Range <10 units)

HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 1 0501

HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 2 06xx

Serologic equivalent: HLA-DQ 1,1 (subtype 5,6)

Fecal anti-ovalbumin (chicken egg) IgA antibody 11 (Normal range <10 units)

Fecal Anti-Saccharomyces cerevisiae (dietary yeast) IgA 11 (Normal range <10 units)

Fecal Anti-Soy IgA 119 (Normal Range < 10 units)

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hathor- let me figure out what i can eat and then we'll talk vegan. i used to be vegetarian so i'm not afraid to try something new. do you have any good recipes for dinners i can try out first?

what about yeast extract? the bullion cubes i bought say they are free of active yeast but in the ingredients it's has yeast extract......


Diagnosed with Celiac Disease February 2007

Finally feeling better than ever!

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hathor- let me figure out what i can eat and then we'll talk vegan. i used to be vegetarian so i'm not afraid to try something new. do you have any good recipes for dinners i can try out first?

what about yeast extract? the bullion cubes i bought say they are free of active yeast but in the ingredients it's has yeast extract......

What sort of things do you like? I've got lots of recipes, tried & untried. At fatfreevegan.com they have a whole gluten-free section. Plus you can always convert regular recipes -- use gluten-free pasta, substitute quinoa for bulghur, etc. The Yahoo group "Vegan-and-Gluten-Free" has scads of recipes posted. Everything I've tried at www.vegsource.com/marla has been excellent (some have ingredients we can't have, though) -- offhand I remember the colcannon, the picadello stew, the polenta casserole & the beans bourguinon (OK, that spelling's off but I'm too lazy to look it up). Food Allergy Survival Guide has a lot of vegan recipes that don't have any common allergens.

Simple main dishes include -- baked sliced polenta (the kind in tubes) with sauce; veggie chili or bean or lentil soup (throw in what you have & what seasonings appeal to you); baked potatoes with assorted sauces; rice or pasta with add-ins -- you can tell I'm a "what do I have" sort of cook :D

Something I like is a baked risotto. It is real easy; you only stir it 3 times & you can add in whatever things appeal to you. I've taken to steaming or stir-frying veggies & making a sauce with coconut milk, a little peanut butter & some fiery spice. I've also done some Ethiopean dishes recently, using hemp tortillas I ordered online. I haven't figured injera yet. I also like curried veggies, garlicky beans made in my crock pot, quinoa with added veggies, oh it is hard to decide.

When I don't mind chopping a lot, I do veggie paella. This is what I make for company. Everyone likes it, even meateaters.

I would probably be more practical for you to go to that Yahoo group. If I type up something I might as well do it for a bunch of people!

About yeast extract I would think you couldn't have it. Enterolab said anything that had yeast. The yeast doesn't have to be alive to cause a reaction. I mean, who ever eats live yeast? The reaction, as I understand it, is to the particular yeast protein or proteins. That would still be there in the extract or dead (er, nonactive -- don't you love the euphemism) yeast. You could always email Enterolab; I just don't see how it could be permissible. Yeast extract has MSG in it too, so it isn't something I particularly want for that reason.


McDougall diet (low fat vegan) since 6/00

Gluten free since 1/6/07

Soy free and completely casein and egg free since 2/15/07

Yeast free, on and off, since 3/1/07 -- I can't notice any difference one way or the other

Enterolab results -- 2/15/07

Fecal Antigliladin IgA 140 (Normal Range <10 units)

Fecal Antitissue Transglutaminase IgA 50 (Normal Range <10 units)

Quantitative Microscopic Fecal Fat Score 517 (Normal Range <300 units)

Fecal anti-casein (cow's milk) IgA antibody 127 (Normal Range <10 units)

HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 1 0501

HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 2 06xx

Serologic equivalent: HLA-DQ 1,1 (subtype 5,6)

Fecal anti-ovalbumin (chicken egg) IgA antibody 11 (Normal range <10 units)

Fecal Anti-Saccharomyces cerevisiae (dietary yeast) IgA 11 (Normal range <10 units)

Fecal Anti-Soy IgA 119 (Normal Range < 10 units)

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Okay, so my Enterolab Results are back. These are the results:

Anitgliadin IgA: 317 (normal <10)

Antitissue Transglutaminase IgA: 139 (normal <10)

Fat Score: 1164 (normal <300)

Anti-Casein: 180 (normal <10)

Chicken Egg: 14 (normal <10)

dietary yeast: 26 (normal <10)

Soy: 141 (normal <10)

I also have one of the main genes and one non-celiac gene predisposing me to gluten sensitvity and that my gluten sensitivity or celiac may be more severe.

NOW to my questions:

Is the casein just diary products or do I need to worry about "hidden" casein like I do with gluten? What are the chances that this will heal being that it's so high?

For the eggs: does the low score mean I should avoid them completely? For instance, should I stop eating gluten-free baked goods with eggs or is that not as problematic? I won't eat them for breakfast but I made meatloaf last night with two eggs, is that bad?

Soy: no problem. I think soy is dangerous in and of itself and the fact that it's promoted as a healthy alternative to things so extensively drives me up a wall.

What is yeast? What is yeast used in?

Thanks for every one's great resources and advice. I didn't realize how bad I was. Esp. the fat absorption. That's scary since I'm not exactly a skinny minny (but not overwight either) but yet I'm not absorbing a whole lot of fat...

I feel better with these results oddly enough.

Amy


Dairy/Cesain free Oct. 2005

Gluten free June 2006

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Okay, so my Enterolab Results are back. These are the results:

Anitgliadin IgA: 317 (normal <10)

Antitissue Transglutaminase IgA: 139 (normal <10)

Fat Score: 1164 (normal <300)

Anti-Casein: 180 (normal <10)

Chicken Egg: 14 (normal <10)

dietary yeast: 26 (normal <10)

Soy: 141 (normal <10)

I also have one of the main genes and one non-celiac gene predisposing me to gluten sensitvity and that my gluten sensitivity or celiac may be more severe.

NOW to my questions:

Is the casein just diary products or do I need to worry about "hidden" casein like I do with gluten? What are the chances that this will heal being that it's so high?

For the eggs: does the low score mean I should avoid them completely? For instance, should I stop eating gluten-free baked goods with eggs or is that not as problematic? I won't eat them for breakfast but I made meatloaf last night with two eggs, is that bad?

Soy: no problem. I think soy is dangerous in and of itself and the fact that it's promoted as a healthy alternative to things so extensively drives me up a wall.

What is yeast? What is yeast used in?

Thanks for every one's great resources and advice. I didn't realize how bad I was. Esp. the fat absorption. That's scary since I'm not exactly a skinny minny (but not overwight either) but yet I'm not absorbing a whole lot of fat...

I feel better with these results oddly enough.

Amy

Susan Here.

I also showed a sinsitivity to eggs. I have used duck eggs with fine results. I also like the taste of them.

Susan


Dairy/Cesain free Oct. 2005

Gluten free June 2006

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Hi I've been gluten free now for 2 years, but just recently had time again to check out the message boards. I would like to know what are enterolab result. I know my doc checked my Antigliadin, but I don't know much else. Thanks for any help you can give me.

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www.enterolab.com

A lot of people have used this lab for testing but some people think it's not accurate.

Amy


Diagnosed with Celiac Disease February 2007

Finally feeling better than ever!

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Hello everyone. I have a neice who is severly casein sensitive. I want to explain logically to her mother that she should test her for gluten sensitivity, since it does run in the family.

Does gluten sensitivity cause casein sensitivity? What, biologically, is happening? Why are they linked? Do you have any references for me?

Thanks!

Mary

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