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Julie-uk-nz

A Celiac That Found He Could Eat Wheat Bread

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I found this on another website:

One of the articles in the links below has an anecdote about a celiac that found he could eat wheat bread if it is made with traditional sourdough methods so that the fermentation starts the digestive process with enzymes that most people lack.

http://www.foodandhealing.com/article-newconceptsindiet2.htm

http://www.westonaprice.org/foodfeatures/be_kind.html

http://www.fbfc.com/scoop/feb01/lacto.html

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I think I saw him walking on water the other day!!!!!!!!

:huh: There actually seems to be some validity to the theory that the large prevalance of gluten intolerance in our society could be related to the fact that we do not properly soak and sprout our grains. I'm not telling any celiacs to go out and buy a loaf of sourdough bread...that's not what anyone's saying. It might make more sense if you read the articles. All three are pretty short, and I would hate to see a bunch of people pop in and comment on this before bothering to read the info...

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Sorry, my internet cynical side was showing. A particular incident was mentioned and "read these three things to find it" seemed unusual. I skimmed all three and didn't see that specific item but I didn't read them all.

I did see one thing that at least met some basic threshold - if there is a process (fermentation) that breaks down the gluten, it is reasonable that the immune system wouldn't recognize it and react. But, as much as we as a community worry about cross contamination, I can't imagine risking less than complete processing.

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Interesting. My dad has many food intolerances - I do not know whether he has Celiac, but I suspect he does. But for a year or two he would only eat one type of bread--traditional sourdough from Panera. He said all the other kinds "gave him problems." I wonder if the Panera was properly fermented?

In the past year or two, however, he stopped eating the Panera sourdough even. He said something changed about it and it started bothering him, so he stopped buying it. He recently decided he can't have any wheat. He still eats Quaker oats.

I am trying to convince him to try a week or two of truly gluten free.

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I couldn't find the anecdote, but the articles were realy interesting and I have heard of this before too. Can't say I'm willing to try it personally, but it makes me curious!

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I read that article, or one of them when I was first researching gluten and celiac.

The man who tried it; if in fact was the same story, was 85 years old, and had a naturopathic doctor daughter. They had to definately do some long process to ferment the bread, and he found out how much he could eat without symptoms. But, I think she mentioned that they could not be sure how he did on a cellular level.

Fascinating, and maybe when scientists start researching celiac more; this might come in useful.

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Very interesting. The theory about us not preparing our grains properly may partly explain how we got from "Bread is the staff of life" in biblical times, to 1 out of 133 people have celiac today.

Hmmm...

Nancy

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um. no thanks. fermented or not, it's not worth possibly becoming sick, in my opinion. but it would be nce to have real bread again.

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Well, for some time I had been eating sourdough bread. But the symptoms I got after each time I ate it is just one of the things that led me to find out it was the wheat which had been causing so many of my health issues. As for the method used to ferment it, I don't know. I'll never tough wheat again anyway.

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