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Guest AlabamaGirl

Entero Lab Results

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Guest AlabamaGirl

Interpretation of Fecal Antitissue Transglutaminase IgA: You have an autoimmune reaction to the human enzyme tissue transglutaminase, secondary to dietary gluten sensitivity.

Does this mean that there is tissue damage?

If so, I tested 'normal' on malabsorption -- that's good. Also, "Although you do not possess the main genes predisposing to celiac sprue (HLA-DQ2 or HLA-DQ8), HLA gene analysis reveals that you have two copies of a gene that predisposes to gluten sensitivity (DQ1 or DQ3 not subtype 8). Having two copies of a gluten sensitive gene, means that each of your parents, and all of your children (if you have them) will possess at least one copy of the gene. Two copies also means there is an even stronger predisposition to gluten sensitivity than having one gene and the resultant immunologic gluten sensitivity may be more severe."

So does this mean I will not develop celiac? Arg. Life is often more confusing after discovery ...

Thanks in advance for any insight!

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Interpretation of Fecal Antitissue Transglutaminase IgA: You have an autoimmune reaction to the human enzyme tissue transglutaminase, secondary to dietary gluten sensitivity.

Does this mean that there is tissue damage?

If so, I tested 'normal' on malabsorption -- that's good. Also, "Although you do not possess the main genes predisposing to celiac sprue (HLA-DQ2 or HLA-DQ8), HLA gene analysis reveals that you have two copies of a gene that predisposes to gluten sensitivity (DQ1 or DQ3 not subtype 8). Having two copies of a gluten sensitive gene, means that each of your parents, and all of your children (if you have them) will possess at least one copy of the gene. Two copies also means there is an even stronger predisposition to gluten sensitivity than having one gene and the resultant immunologic gluten sensitivity may be more severe."

So does this mean I will not develop celiac? Arg. Life is often more confusing after discovery ...

Thanks in advance for any insight!

Can you post the whole test results with numbers and everything.

I for one do not carry the celiac genes, but i tested positive with blood work.

paula

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I suggest you write or even call Enterolab. They are more than happy to answer any and all of your questions. I tested through Elab 2x. I received prompt replies to all my email and phone inquiries. I also recently met Dr. Fine and heard him speak about why he uses tests which can detect gluten sensitivity before the intestinal villi are damaged enough to diagnose celiac disease. In Dr. Fine's words "Celiac Disease is just the tip of the gluten sensitivity iceberg'. There are so many more forms of physical damage that gluten sensitivity can cause through other autoimmune conditions. If you are sensitive enough to gluten to show antibodies to tissue transglutaminase which is your body's OWN enzymes, you are on your way to more damage while you continue to eat gluten.

As for your own results: 'dietary gluten sensitivity' means STOP EATING GLUTEN ASAP! 'Autoimmune reaction to the human enzyme tissue transglutaminase' means the presence of gluten in your intestines makes your body attack itself by producing antibodies which attack its own tissues. That also means 'STOP EATING GLUTEN NOW IF NOT BEFORE'! The DQ1 and 3 genes are common in people who have gluten sensitivity, but don't often have enough intestinal damage to be considered 'celiac'. Nevertheless they can develop other autoimmune disorders. So if you have those genes plus symptoms which influenced you to test with Elab, I suspect that means you should 'STOP EATING GLUTEN NOW'. If you want a more technical explanation, contact Enterolab.

BURDEE

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The first test only means that those particular antibodies were detected. I don't think that means there has necessarily been any tissue damage resulting from those antibodies. You can always email Enterolab for clarification. Since you lack malabsorption, it would seem you have no intestinal damage anyway.

The issue of genes are celiac is unsettled. Some are considering whether there are other genes that can be involved (occasionally someone without the celiac genes is diagnosed) or whether there is a larger spectrum of gluten intolerance than celiac. You might not ever get the intestinal damage of celiac, but you could still develop other problems due to gluten.

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Enterolab can't diagnose Celiac disease, you need an intestinal biopsy for that. They can only tell you if you're having autoimmune reactions to gliadin (wheat protein), malabsorption (which often goes along with celiac), and an autoimmune reaction to ttg (in the intestines). TtG is a normal tissue protein that celiacs often have an autoimmune reaction to, their body will start to attack it. Not a good thing. You can have celiac disease without having any of the currently known genes. And certainly there are other genes that have been linked to gluten related problems, like the DQ1 genes, especially to neurological issues with gluten.

So the end result is the same as if you have celiac. You're having autoimmune reactions to gliadin, they're just manifesting somewhat differently. Read the gluten file in my signature for information.

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Guest AlabamaGirl

Here are complete numbers. I've been gluten-free (as best I can) for about 1-1.5 yrs now (from when I first discovered, quite accidentally, that it was making me seriously sick).

Fecal Antigliadin IgA 41 (Normal Range <10 Units)

Fecal Antitissue Transglutaminase IgA 16 Units (Normal Range <10 Units)

Quantitative Microscopic Fecal Fat Score <300 Units (Normal Range <300 Units)

Fecal anti-casein (cow's milk) IgA antibody 19 Units (Normal Range <10 Units)

HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 1 0501

HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 2 0503

Serologic equivalent: HLA-DQ 1,1 (Subtype 5,5)

I have contacted EnteroLabs, but since it's the weekend, I probably won't hear from them for a few days.

Nancym, the files are fascinating stuff. Those articles describe my symptoms better than any other celiac forum -- I have kind of *atypical* symptoms, but serious symptoms nonetheless.

Edited to add: I cannot find entero's phone #. If anyone knows where to find the contact #, please share. thanks!

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Ah, another double DQ person. We should start a club. This is one of those things that gets kicked around as linked to gluten-related neurological issues ...

The phone number for Enterolab is shown under the menu on the left side. You can also email them.

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Guest AlabamaGirl
Ah, another double DQ person. We should start a club. This is one of those things that gets kicked around as linked to gluten-related neurological issues ...

Great, like I need any more neurological issues. :lol:

The double DQ thing seems a little rare ... do you know anything else about it besides it makes me more prone to gluten sensitivity? At least there is no question about which parent I inherited this from! Also, their q&a page didn't even mention one of my genes, so who knows what that one is.

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Hi Alabama girl - yes welcome to the double DQ1 group. No wonder you were so sick.

Those of us that have double DQ1 know how awful it is. Believe me double DQ1 gets everything that a "celiac" (sic) person gets plus some like all the neuro stuff, including depression, the heart problems, and all the other auto immune diseases, oh plus we seem to get the food allergies worse than the DQ2 & DQ8 people. Thank your lucky stars that you were fortunate to know about Enterolab and smart enough to test thru them.

from your personal experience you will soon learn that this talk of celiac versus gluten intolerance is a bunch of hooey and that really there is no difference. Gluten is POISON to us. But even here in Houston at my celiac support group they ignore gluten sensitivity like it does not exist...

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Hi Alabama girl - yes welcome to the double DQ1 group. No wonder you were so sick.

Those of us that have double DQ1 know how awful it is. Believe me double DQ1 gets everything that a "celiac" (sic) person gets plus some like all the neuro stuff, including depression, the heart problems, and all the other auto immune diseases, oh plus we seem to get the food allergies worse than the DQ2 & DQ8 people. Thank your lucky stars that you were fortunate to know about Enterolab and smart enough to test thru them.

from your personal experience you will soon learn that this talk of celiac versus gluten intolerance is a bunch of hooey and that really there is no difference. Gluten is POISON to us. But even here in Houston at my celiac support group they ignore gluten sensitivity like it does not exist...

Hi GFPaperDoll: I TOTALLY agree. Celiac dx or not, GLUTEN IS POISON for many people. I heard Dr. Fine's presentation in Bellingham, WA which convinced me that 'Celiac is just the tip of the Gluten Intolerance iceberg'. I bought his DVD set to share with my local GIG support group. YUP, DQ1s are prone to all those autoimmune complications. I'm so glad I'm a DQ8, even though I have celiac disease plus 4 food allergies. I was misdiagnosed for 50 years and still only developed those 5 food sensitivities. Others my age have RA, Thyroid problems, Sjogren's, etc. etc. Take care ...

BURDEE

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Guest AlabamaGirl

Of course my mom & dad know what's going on, but I don't think they consider themselves gluten sensitive (they may not be, but it seems worth looking into). Plus, I have four brothers who have various health problems. How is the best way to inform them of these test results and urge them to look into this? I don't really know how to explain this to them, especially since I'm just learning what is up with me.

Also, if anyone has any ideas how I should proceed with my two children in seeing if they are gluten-sensitive (b/c according to entero, they definitely have at least one gene), please let me know ... I'm thinking I'll be doing a challenge!

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For my family, I just explained the test results and that I feel better on the diet. No one else has shown an interest in being tested. My particular symptoms seem to be unique in my family, although a couple say they have IBS. I can't really do any more than that. They don't listen to me about diet anyway ... I figure I've planted the seed. At some point one or more may decide to be tested or to see if cutting out gluten makes them feel better. (I first cut out gluten, saw a positive reaction, and then decided to do the testing.)

For my kids, I don't view having one "sensitivity" gene (at least) as any big warning sign. Practically everyone in the US has either gluten sensitivity or celiac genes. (Only those of Asian heritage may not.) If either of them develop symptoms, they know of the testing available. Recognizing that one needs not only the genes but a trigger as well, my daughter has decided to go gluten light. My son ... well, I'm more concerned about all the junk he eats and the absence of veggies than the gluten. But he is 22 and has to make his own decisions.

I don't know how rare double DQ1 is. It seems to be mentioned frequently enough. Maybe complaining about it is one of the symptoms :lol: At least I have a possible explanation now for my body's weird little quirks; I'm not necessarily nuts :blink:

I'm considering having one of those blood tests for food sensitivities. I'm not sure I know of everything. I was sensitive for everything Enterolab tests for, but what else? I've been having some reactions recently and I don't know if it is second hand gluten (or casein, or soy, or egg, or yeast ... sigh) or some other sensitivity. But I imagine myself holding the lancet, completely unable to prick my own finger. My husband has already said there is no way he will do it for me :rolleyes:

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En

Here are complete numbers. I've been gluten-free (as best I can) for about 1-1.5 yrs now (from when I first discovered, quite accidentally, that it waterolab phone number is 972-686-6869

s making me seriously sick).

Fecal Antigliadin IgA 41 (Normal Range <10 Units)

Fecal Antitissue Transglutaminase IgA 16 Units (Normal Range <10 Units)

Quantitative Microscopic Fecal Fat Score <300 Units (Normal Range <300 Units)

Fecal anti-casein (cow's milk) IgA antibody 19 Units (Normal Range <10 Units)

HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 1 0501

HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 2 0503

Serologic equivalent: HLA-DQ 1,1 (Subtype 5,5)

I have contacted EnteroLabs, but since it's the weekend, I probably won't hear from them for a few days.

Nancym, the files are fascinating stuff. Those articles describe my symptoms better than any other celiac forum -- I have kind of *atypical* symptoms, but serious symptoms nonetheless.

Edited to add: I cannot find entero's phone #. If anyone knows where to find the contact #, please share. thanks!

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Hi there! My results are similar to yours. I was tested by Entero Labs in February. My results:

Fecal Antigliadin IgA 39 (Normal Range <10 Units)

Fecal Antitissue Transglutaminase IgA 55 Units (Normal Range <10 Units)

Quantitative Microscopic Fecal Fat Score <300 Units (Normal Range <300 Units)

Fecal anti-casein (cow

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Interpretation of Fecal Antitissue Transglutaminase IgA: You have an autoimmune reaction to the human enzyme tissue transglutaminase, secondary to dietary gluten sensitivity.

Does this mean that there is tissue damage?

If so, I tested 'normal' on malabsorption -- that's good. Also, "Although you do not possess the main genes predisposing to celiac sprue (HLA-DQ2 or HLA-DQ8), HLA gene analysis reveals that you have two copies of a gene that predisposes to gluten sensitivity (DQ1 or DQ3 not subtype 8). Having two copies of a gluten sensitive gene, means that each of your parents, and all of your children (if you have them) will possess at least one copy of the gene. Two copies also means there is an even stronger predisposition to gluten sensitivity than having one gene and the resultant immunologic gluten sensitivity may be more severe."

So does this mean I will not develop celiac? Arg. Life is often more confusing after discovery ...

Thanks in advance for any insight!

Elevated antibodies can't diagnose tissue damage, only the endocscopy / biopsy can do that. It means that your body is producing high levels of transglutaminase IgA in response to gluten sensitivity.

The genes for gluten intolerance mean that you can develop gluten intolerance (which, based on your antibody levels, you probably have, already). These are sort of like a related gene to the celiac gene. It does not mean that you will not develop celiac. The celiac genes are the ones they have found to be most prevalent in persons with celiac. But it's still an imperfect science, and I have read that you can still develop celiac disease without the genes for it.

BTW - my test results from Enterolab were very similar to yours - which is why I researched them.... :)

Don't be confused - gluten intolerance and celiac disease are pretty much the same - you need to not eat gluten, either way.. :)

Sheryll

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