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Amanda Thomas

Hair Loss

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You have all been a wealth of information to me. My 3 year old was diagnosed on 4/5/07 and has been gluten and wheat free since 4/6/07. I went the whole 9 yards, new pots pans, dishes silverware, sippy cups, strainers, toaster,etc... I know she is not being cross contaminated.

This past Saturday, she woke up and had a clump of hair on her pillow, I didn't think too much of it, now every morning she is waking up with clumps on her pillow and as I brush her hair, it falls out. She has spots of baldness. Has anyone else ever experienced this? We are going into the doctor in the morning, just wanted some ideas before I went in if possible.

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It sounds like Alopecia. My son had this and lost half his hair. We ended up using a natural product with essential oil called Kalasol and it grew his hair back. Hair loss can be caused by gluten, but it says your daughter is now gluten free. The other thing I know of that can cause hair loss is hypothyroidism. If you get her checked, make sure they don't check just her TSH. She needs several other tests especially the Thyroid peroxidase antibodies. Go on some of the thyroid threads to get more info on the tests (from Georgie). I can't remember all the tests at the moment.

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You didn't mention personal care products specifically, so I just wanted to remind you that shampoo, lotion, cosmetics, nail polish (thinking of you here not her), all can have gluten in it. I was glutening myself and my kids once because of CC from my nails (doh!).

Nancy

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Alopecia can definitely be connected to celiac disease. Your daughter has only been gluten free just under 3 weeks, so it would not be surprising if her body is still showing effects of gluten ingestion...and it's also possible that she is still getting gluten from something in her diet, perhaps from cross contamination. Keep up with the gluten free diet, and, as suggested by loraleena talk with your doctor about testing for other health problems such as thyroid, vitamin & mineral levels, and other malabsorption issues.

Michelle

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Alopecia can definitely be connected to celiac disease. Your daughter has only been gluten free just under 3 weeks, so it would not be surprising if her body is still showing effects of gluten ingestion...and it's also possible that she is still getting gluten from something in her diet, perhaps from cross contamination. Keep up with the gluten free diet, and, as suggested by loraleena talk with your doctor about testing for other health problems such as thyroid, vitamin & mineral levels, and other malabsorption issues.

Michelle

I was more concerned because it just started to happen, just this past weekend. We use the Suave kids 2 in 1 shampoo and johnsons buddies body wash. We also use burts bees, but I ran out last week. Her hair has never fallen out before, maybe I am being over paranoid!!! Since I am still new to this, what do I look for in the bath products? Would they say contain wheat?

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Alopecia can happen suddenly or take a while. Shampoo,lotions, etc. do not have to say wheat. I would check on a gluten listing site for products that are safe, or actually call the company. I use Giovanni and Shakai, both confirmed safe by the company and all natural. Has your daughter had a illness about 3 months ago? Illnesses can trigger Alopecia (it is autoimmune) and it takes 3 months for the hair folicle to die and the strand to fall out. My son's started exactly 3 months after having the croup.

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Alopecia areata (if that's what your child has) can also come from stress, other illnesses, weather changes, practically anything. My niece has it, which is an autoimmune disease and not any of the fungal or dermatitis forms which can be easily treated. It doesn't hurt her at all, and luckily she only has one spot. She's been given a cream to help stop it from spreading, but from what my sister was told not much can truly be done about it if it is the autoimmune version called alopecia areata, which is what she has. My niece has this form of alopecia but does not have celiac disease, however since both are autoimmune diseases there does seem to be a correlation between the two.

Here are a couple of links describing some of the symptoms as well as what you could do next:

http://www.keepkidshealthy.com/symptoms/hairloss.html

http://www.thebaldtruth.com/children.asp

I would bring this to your pediatrician's attention and see if something can be done.

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Apparently there is a stronger correlation between celiac and alopecia areata than once thought.

A Google search came up with this Pubmed article:

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.f...st_uids=7557104

Celiac disease and alopecia areata: report of a new association.

Corazza GR,

Andreani ML,

Venturo N,

Bernardi M,

Tosti A,

Gasbarrini G.

Department of Internal Medicine, University of L'Aquila, Italy.

Celiac disease is frequently associated with other autoimmune disorders but has never been reported in association with alopecia areata. In a routine clinical practice, 3 patients with such an association were observed. In one of the patients, celiac disease was diagnosed after the occurrence of malabsorption symptoms. In the youngest patient, a 14-year-old boy, gluten-free diet resulted in complete regrowth of scalp and body hair. A prospective screening program for celiac disease using antigliadin and antiendomysial antibodies was therefore set up in 256 consecutive outpatients with alopecia areata. Three patients, all completely asymptomatic for intestinal diseases, were found to be positive and underwent biopsy. Histological analysis showed a flat intestinal mucosa consistent with the diagnosis of celiac disease. The results show that alopecia areata may constitute the only clinical manifestation of celiac disease and that the association between these two conditions is a real one because the observed frequency of association is much greater than can be expected by chance. It is suggested that antigliadin and antiendomysial antibodies should be included in the work-up of patients with alopecia areata.

PMID: 7557104 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Michelle

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We went into her pedi yesterday and spent a lot of time talking. Kaitlyn Grace is very anemic, so we started a new vitamin. Again I thank all of you, I tend to go worse case scenario with everything!!! We are going to do this vitamin and after 2 weeks do another iron test, if she is still anemic, he said we should delve further.

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