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hathor

Just When I Thought I'd Figured It All Out

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I was researching something else & found this list of what is allowed, to be questioned, or not allowed on a gluten free diet. It is from the University of Rochester Medical Center:

http://www.stronghealth.com/services/prima.../Glutenfree.pdf

It includes dried fruit, canola oil, & cooking sprays as items to be avoided. Huh? Other than the cooking sprays that include flour, what am I missing? If anything :rolleyes: I can't recall ever seeing these items on other lists.

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I just came back from the store and read that Pam contains grain alcohol, it does not list wheat as required by law, so my assumption would be that it is corn derived. But, with that being said, I bought Crisco l00% extra virgin Olive Oil spray.

Some dried fruit are dusted to reduce sticking together. I buy dried dates all the time when my sweet tooth kicks in and it is listed as only Dried Dates.

Some people here do react to canola oil at times, but I do not think that it is gluten related.

It does get confusing at times.

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I just came back from the store and read that Pam contains grain alcohol, it does not list wheat as required by law, so my assumption would be that it is corn derived. But, with that being said, I bought Crisco l00% extra virgin Olive Oil spray.

Some dried fruit are dusted to reduce sticking together. I buy dried dates all the time when my sweet tooth kicks in and it is listed as only Dried Dates.

Some people here do react to canola oil at times, but I do not think that it is gluten related.

It does get confusing at times.

I just called ConAgra 1 (800) 726-4968, regarding the grain alcohol source in Pan's ingredient listing. They will also list the top 8 allergens in the ingredient list as well as below, list whatever common allergens would be present. Wheat is not listed.

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A little more research --

Someone elsewhere also mentioned that sometimes dried fruit is dusted. But why wouldn't the law require this to be listed in ingredients? Besides the list I posted said never to eat dried fruit, not to check it out or make sure it isn't dusted with flour. (Wheat flour would seem a poor choice for this since wheat is a common allergen.)

I've googled the subject and all I get are indications that dried fruit is gluten-free.

My cooking spray doesn't have alcohol listed, but rather soy lecithin (which I can have despite my soy intolerance, or so I've been told) and an unnamed propellant. But, aren't people now saying that grain alcohol is OK, wherever it is from, because no gluten makes it through the distillation process?

I did find an article mentioning that some had proclaimed that canola oil was unsafe for celiacs, but there is no explanation for why. The author thought this was a mistake. All the lists I've seen, until this one, did not single this oil out. So maybe this list is something that was developed some time ago? Perhaps someone who has been gluten-free longer than I can explain this one.

I also now notice that the top of the list says one must avoid millet & buckwheat, but that this is corrected when you get to the food lists.

I'm wondering if there is controversy over what is or isn't gluten-free that I, newbie as I am, have been unaware of. Yes, I know about the whole oats thing, but these other categories are news to me. Of course, this list could simply be wrong.

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I don't think the fruit is dusted, but the conveyor belts may be. Since it isn't added to the food it isn't required to list it. Buy from a reputable company and it shouldn't be an issue.

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I don't think the fruit is dusted, but the conveyor belts may be. Since it isn't added to the food it isn't required to list it. Buy from a reputable company and it shouldn't be an issue.

I have seen date bits that are dusted with oats. But the oats are clearly listed.

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I checked out the link and it also says to avoid buckwheat. We've known for many, many years now that buckwheat is perfectly safe as long as wheat flour isn't added. Canola is perfectly safe. Sprays are perfectly safe except a "baker's" one that very clearly lists wheat. "Dusting" a line with wheat flour would now require that it be listed, but honestly I haven't seen lines "dusted" with wheat flour in 5 years.

Ignore that web site.

richard

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Part of the problem as I see it is that there seems to be so many list out there that say different things are safe or not safe. You look at one and it will say Buck wheat is safe or Oats are safe. But then you look at another list and they are not safe. Which list are we suppose to rely on?

I went to a gluten free store the other day and they have GLUTEN FREE OATS in there. But my understanding has always been Oats are bad. So again what list do we go by?

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So again what list do we go by?

You take *no* list as gospel, but rather understand the concepts that put things on the list (or have them removed) so that you understand what makes something gluten free or not. For instance, the oats question isnt answered by something being on the gluten-free list or not, you need to know about the chance of cross reactivity amongst celiacs and contamination in the field.

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I don't use lists of specific products ... I go by food labeling laws and the companies that we know clearly will disclose any gluten source.

hathor-that list is unreliable. You don't need a list if you go by the theory that you read everything equally before you put it in your mouth.

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Hi, all. I live in Canada and I understand that labelling laws here are not very strict concerning the term "gluten-free". I have read that our food safety governing body feels that there are acceptable levels of exposure so that any product coming in under a certain level can be labelled gluten-free, even though it contains gluten. So, like many of you, I don't trust lists completely, just as a guideline.

I have only been gluten-free on a doctor's orders for a couple of weeks. I am still discovering what is safe and what is not for me.

I can tell you that dried fruit purchased from a bulk food store is NOT safe! I ate some 2 days ago and had a huge reaction. Everything else I ate that day was safe so it had to have been that. Like many of you, I have also read that dried fruit is dusted with wheat flour to prevent clumping (as are potato chips). I also have been warned about cross-contamination in bulk food stores where scoops from one bin may be used in another.

I guess it all just comes down to maintaining your vigilance. To vary a well-known dieting phrase: "A moment on the lips, a lifetime of DH?" SO not worth it!!!

Karen

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I have got to question the logic of this. Wheat flour, in particular gluten, is EXTREMELY sticky stuff if it comes into contact with water or moisture. And even "dried fruit" is pretty moist. Using it to prevent sticking would be like using glue to prevent sticking. I'd suspect they'd use some sort of starch like corn starch to prevent sticking, like you'd use to prevent chaffing. Wheat flour just wouldn't work.

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Hello All - I'm relatively new to this whole gluten free life style, so I'm hoping that someone can help me out with some advice.

I'm wondering about soy - specifically soybean oil found in peanut butter. Is this safe to consume? My daughter has DH and lately it's been flaring up alot and I'm wondering if I'm inadvertantly glutening her by giving her peanut butter on a rice cake for lunch. Any advice would be welcome - thanks!

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I've heard of canola presenting some sort of cross reactivity issue, but I think that's a pretty outdated belief. Millet and buckwheat are fine (buckwheat isn't even a grain), unless of course you react to them for another reason. I honestly am starting to think this whole gluten-free thing is made to sound a whole heck of a lot more complicated than it really has to be. :)

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B)-->

QUOTE(Lola B @ May 17 2007, 11:47 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>
Hello All - I'm relatively new to this whole gluten free life style, so I'm hoping that someone can help me out with some advice.

I'm wondering about soy - specifically soybean oil found in peanut butter. Is this safe to consume? My daughter has DH and lately it's been flaring up alot and I'm wondering if I'm inadvertantly glutening her by giving her peanut butter on a rice cake for lunch. Any advice would be welcome - thanks!

I don't know about soybean oil, peanut butter or rice cakes being particularly susceptible to cross-contamination with gluten. It is possible that your daughter reacts to soy, however. Skin problems are a common reaction for those who are intolerant to soy, I've read. It is how I react, I know.

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I am really turning into the type of person who rather do it a little harder than have unknown chemicals in my products. So I figured I'd share my newest find!

http://www.williams-sonoma.com/products/sk...m?pkey=cCTLOTPI

It takes regular canola, olive, or anykind of oil and sprays it! no more "propellants" or "grain alchohol" and chemicals you have no idea what it is!

Pampered Chef also has one too, I love mine!

Yeah I get way too excited over kitchen gadgets!

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