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majicbunnies

Made In Canada

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I heard Canada has their gluten limit/law, so does that mean that food they ship to the US (made in Canada) follows their law? I know we don't have our ppm limit yet (or whatever it's called), but since it's from Canada, does that mean you can't completely trust it to be 100% gluten-free?

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Pretty much anything cannot be trusted to be 100% gluten-free that is produced. This is based on facilities and where they get their ingredients. Plus, if you ever eat out that is a close call, too. If a company tests for gluten and it passes their tests that id good in my opinion but it all depends on your reaction to. It is all so confusing, MajicBunnies!

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Here is the applicable Canadian regulation. It applies to food sold in Canada, but food sold outside Canada may not have to adhere to the rule.

Food and Drug Regulation B.24.018

No person shall label, package, sell or advertise a food in a manner likely to create an impression that it is gluten-free unless the food does not contain wheat, including spelt and kamut, or oats, barley, rye or triticale or any part thereof.

Under this rule, gluten-free means gluten-free. It even goes so far as to say that selling "gluten-free oats" is illegal in Canada. It is so restrictive, when taken with another regulation, that many foods that are actually gluten-free may not legally be so labeled.

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like psawyer said, if it says gluten-free here in Canada, it is. And if it's stated gluten-free and isn't, even if it's not labelled gluten-free, we can report it to the Canada Food Inspection Agency and they'll look into it. That's how strict the law is. Also if there is any "natural ingredients" or spices it must state whats in it, and give warnings (if applicable) if its made in a facility with eggs/soy/wheat/dairy. Hope that helps.

~ Lisa ~

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I am in Canada....i use and trust products like Glutanio and El Peto ... El Peto company is based in Kitchener which for me is a 2.5 hour drive...there standards are very high and they have too follow regulations provided by the goverment it is law....through my reading and research i find there is too many product differences between the US and Canada...some products in the US are gluten-free but here in Canada there not.....as for Canada shipping to the US in order for the product to pass inspection if they say gluten-free they and have to be according to Canadain regulations...some products that are shipped from the US to Canada canadains have the same concerns as you...but the golden rule still applies....read labels all the time...products can be changed without notice..

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What are Canadian laws about cross contamination?

I have a box of Nature's Path Organic Honey'd corn flakes that were made in Canada, but I bought them in the states. There's 'gluten free' labels all over it, but when you read the ingredients panel it says 'produced in a facility that contains peanuts, tree nuts, soy & wheat.'

Is there a gluten parts per million (ppm) limit for Canadian gluten-free products?

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I am not aware of any law specifically respecting cross-contamination. As stated above, in Canada, if any part of the prohibited grains is present, the product can not be represented as "gluten-free." Any detectable amount would render the claim false, so it is a question of how sensitive a test is used. There is no "permissible" amount.

When investigating a complaint, my understanding is that the test used by the Canadian Food Inspection Agency has a sensitivity of 20 ppm. But a smaller amount, if proven, would still disqualify the product.

I hope this helps.

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