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familyfirst

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My son has not been offically dx for celiac disease. However, I'm not waiting around. I was wanting to know any suggestions that will help me save HOURS at the store when I go earlier next week. I know that it can be expensive. I don't want to spend my whole night at the store looking for gluten-free food. Is there a cheat sheet that I can look at to help my decisions? Also, I am a working mom of 3, so time cooking is limited. HELP me out please! I have enjoyed reading and learning about celiac disease in this forum. I look forward to learning a lot more for my family's sake.

Beth

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Well, to start with you can always make things that are naturally gluten-free while you get used to the do's, don'ts, and the tastes-bads. Some stores have cheat-sheets but you still have to read the lable- that is essential! For bread the consensus is Kinnikinnick brand. For other things that everyone can eat and might like: I enjoy Lundberg brand Risotto (you can do them stove top or microwave, and they are delicious and microwaving them is easier); my Mother enjoys making lasagna with Organ lasagna noodles; she also likes making chicken noodle soup with rice instead of noodles since so that my father will eat it, too; pretty much anything Glutino brand my family has had (three of us are Celiacs) has been wonderfuly good- their pretzels, frozen meals, and such except for their breadsticks (yuck!); my family also enjoys pretty much anything from Kinnikinnick, too; and Whole Foods Bakery brand is good as well. Gluten-free is expensive but it does not have to be. A lot of things, like fruits, veggies, and meats, are naturally gluten-free. Good luck to you and your son, Beth. Oh, a tastes-bad from my family to yours is anything from Enjoy Life brand. If we see something from theirs that looks tempting we usually put it down because everything else we have tried has been nasty!

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Do you plan on going to a health food store or a regular grocery store? We go to both, from the health food store we get bread, snacks, cereal, cookies and the reg. store everything else. Like for spaghetti I get the noodles from Earthfare and everything else from Food Lion. Its very time consuming.

Ask your health food store if they have a gluten-free list and my store even has a person that will help you shop for gluten free. Some of the things my 3 year old has liked... gluten-free Amy's rice mac n cheese (frozen), Tinkyada rice pasta is very good, Mi-Del cookies, and any of the envirokidz brand food. Envirokidz has very good cereal and snack bars. Glutino pretzels and frozen cheese pizzas. You might need to try a little at a time to see what you child will eat. This stuff is good but it is NOT the same as regular food. Luckily my child is only 3 and doesnt know the difference.

Let me know if I can help with anything else.

Stephanie

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The home site of Celiac.com has a few lists that are helpful

Safe and Forbidden Foods

You have to click on the link at the end of each line.

The safest, and cheapest, way to go is to fix meals and snacks that are naturally gluten-free, and then expand your foods as your knowledge increases. Some of the gluten-free substitutes aren't worth the money for the poor taste and textures.

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The home site of Celiac.com has a few lists that are helpful

Safe and Forbidden Foods

You have to click on the link at the end of each line.

The safest, and cheapest, way to go is to fix meals and snacks that are naturally gluten-free, and then expand your foods as your knowledge increases. Some of the gluten-free substitutes aren't worth the money for the poor taste and textures.

I would definetly start wiht foods that are naturally gluten-free and choose one or two specialty items to start with..the taste goods and yucks very from family to family so you will have to experiment a bit. Most kids like just a few things anyway..

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OH, and make a list as you go of what you like and what you dont like. It helps and then you dont have to rely on your memory! I saw on this board some where to put a list inside your pantry to write the likes and dislikes on. That helped us when we first started. My kid is a streak eater anyway, so while he was stuck on the same thing for a week I would search for something else.

Stephanie

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